And did the Holy and the Just

And did the Holy and the Just

Author: Anne Steele
Tune: SALZBURG (Haydn)
Published in 115 hymnals

Printable scores: PDF, Noteworthy Composer
Audio files: MIDI

Full Text

1 And did the holy and the just,
The sovereign of the skies,
Stoop down to wretchedness and dust,
That guilty man might rise?

2 Yes, the Redeemer left his throne--
His radiant throne on high--
Surprising mercy! love unknown!
To suffer, bleed, and die.

3 To dwell with misery here below,
The Saviour left the skies,
And sank to wretchedness and woe,
That worthless man might rise.

4 He took the dying traitor's place,
And suffered in his stead:
For sinful man--oh, wondrous grace!
For sinful man he bled.

5 O Lord, what heavenly wonders dwell
In thine atoning blood!
By this are sinners saved from hell,
And rebels brought to God.

Source: The Voice of Praise: a collection of hymns for the use of the Methodist Church #386

Author: Anne Steele

Anne Steele was born at Broughton, Hampshire, in 1717. Her father was a timber merchant, and at the same time officiated as the lay pastor of the Baptist Society at Broughton. Her mother died when she was 3. At the age of 19 she became an invalid after injuring her hip. At the age of 21 she was engaged to be married but her fiance drowned the day of the wedding. On the occasion of his death she wrote the hymn "When I survey life's varied scenes." After the death of her fiance she assisted her father with his ministry and remained single. Despite her sufferings she maintained a cheerful attitude. She published a book of poetry Poems on subjects chiefly devotional in 1760 under the pseudonym "Theodosia." The remaining works were published a… Go to person page >

Notes

And did the Holy and the Just. Anne Steele. [Redemption.] A more than usually successful hymn by this writer. It appeared in her Poems, etc., 1760 and 1780, vol. i. p. 175, in 6 stanzas of 4 lines, entitled, "The wonders of Redemption." It is based on 1 Pet. iii. 18. It was also included in Sedgwick's reprint of her Hymns, 1863, p. 108. It was first brought into common use by Ash and Evans in their Baptist Bristol Collection, 1769. Its use in Great Britain is limited, but in America it is found in many collections.

-- John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907)

Timeline

Media

The Cyber Hymnal #11099
  • PDF (PDF)
  • Noteworthy Composer Score (NWC)

Instances

Instances (1 - 2 of 2)Text InfoTune InfoTextScoreFlexScoreAudioPage Scan
The Baptist Hymnal: for use in the church and home #242
The Cyber Hymnal #11099TextScoreAudio
Include 113 pre-1979 instances



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