Cuán dulce el nombre de Jesús

Full Text

1 ¡Cuán dulce el nombre de Jesús
Es para el hombre fiel!
Consuelo, paz, vigor, salud
Encuentra sinpre en él.

2 Al pecho herido fuerzas da,
Y calma al corazón;
al alma hambrienta escual maná,
Y alivia su aflieción.

3 Tan dulce nombre es para mí
De dones plenitud,
Raudal que nunca exhausto vi
De gracia y de salud.

4 ¡Jesús, mi amigo y mi sostén!
¡Bendito Salvador1
¡Mi vida y luz, mi eterno bien!
Acepta mi loor.

5 Es pobre ahora mi cantar;
Mas cuando en gloria esté
Y allí te pueda contemplar,
Mejor te alabaré.


Source: Culto Cristiano #27

Author: John Newton

Newton, John, who was born in London, July 24, 1725, and died there Dec. 21, 1807, occupied an unique position among the founders of the Evangelical School, due as much to the romance of his young life and the striking history of his conversion, as to his force of character. His mother, a pious Dissenter, stored his childish mind with Scripture, but died when he was seven years old. At the age of eleven, after two years' schooling, during which he learned the rudiments of Latin, he went to sea with his father. His life at sea teems with wonderful escapes, vivid dreams, and sailor recklessness. He grew into an abandoned and godless sailor. The religious fits of his boyhood changed into settled infidelity, through the study of Shaftesbury and… Go to person page >

Translator: Jose M. de Mora

(no biographical information available about Jose M. de Mora.) Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: Cuán dulce el nombre de Jesús
English Title: How sweet the name of Jesus sounds
Author: John Newton
Translator: Jose M. de Mora
Language: Spanish

Tune

MARTYRDOM (Wilson)

MARTYRDOM was originally an eighteenth-century Scottish folk melody used for the ballad "Helen of Kirkconnel." Hugh Wilson (b. Fenwick, Ayrshire, Scotland, c. 1766; d. Duntocher, Scotland, 1824) adapted MARTYRDOM into a hymn tune in duple meter around 1800. A triple-meter version of the tune was fir…

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ZERAH


ST. PETER (Reinagle)

Composed by Alexander R. Reinagle (b. Brighton, Sussex, England, 1799; d. Kidlington, Oxfordshire, England, 1877), ST. PETER was published as a setting for Psalm 118 in Reinagle's Psalm Tunes for the Voice and Pianoforte (c. 1836). The tune first appeared with Newton's text in Hymns Ancient and Mode…

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Timeline




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