Jesus! the Name High over All

Full Text

1 Jesus, the Name high over all,
in hell or earth or sky;
angels and mortals prostrate fall,
and devils fear and fly.
Jesus, the Name to sinners dear,
the Name to sinners giv'n;
it scatters all their guilty fear,
it turns their hell to heav'n.

2 O that the world might taste and see
the riches of His grace!
The arms of love that compass me
would all the world embrace.
Thee I shall constantly proclaim,
though earth and hell oppose;
bold to confess Thy glorious Name
before a world of foes.

3 His only righteousness I show,
His saving truth proclaim;
'tis all my business here below
to cry, "Behold the Lamb!"
Happy, if with my latest breath
I may but gasp His Name,
preach Him to all, and cry in death,
"Behold, behold the Lamb!"


Source: Hymns to the Living God #195

Author: Charles Wesley

Charles Wesley, M.A. was the great hymn-writer of the Wesley family, perhaps, taking quantity and quality into consideration, the great hymn-writer of all ages. Charles Wesley was the youngest son and 18th child of Samuel and Susanna Wesley, and was born at Epworth Rectory, Dec. 18, 1707. In 1716 he went to Westminster School, being provided with a home and board by his elder brother Samuel, then usher at the school, until 1721, when he was elected King's Scholar, and as such received his board and education free. In 1726 Charles Wesley was elected to a Westminster studentship at Christ Church, Oxford, where he took his degree in 1729, and became a college tutor. In the early part of the same year his religious impressions were much deepene… Go to person page >

Notes

An excerpt of the longer hymn, "Jesu, accept the grateful song," Hymns and Sacred Poems (1749), vol. 1, no. CXCIV.

Tune

LYDIA (Phillips)


GRÄFENBERG

Composed by Johann Crüger (PHH 42) as a setting for Paul Gerhardt's "Nun danket all’ und bringet Ehr," GRÄFENBERG was first published in the 1647 edition of Crüger's Praxis Pietatis Melica. The tune is arbitrarily named after a water-cure spa in Silesia, Austria, which became famous in the 1820…

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MARTYRDOM (Wilson)

MARTYRDOM was originally an eighteenth-century Scottish folk melody used for the ballad "Helen of Kirkconnel." Hugh Wilson (b. Fenwick, Ayrshire, Scotland, c. 1766; d. Duntocher, Scotland, 1824) adapted MARTYRDOM into a hymn tune in duple meter around 1800. A triple-meter version of the tune was fir…

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The Cyber Hymnal #3383
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The United Methodist Hymnal #193
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Instances

Instances (1 - 16 of 16)Text InfoTune InfoTextScoreFlexScoreAudioPage Scan
Anglican Hymns Old and New (Rev. and Enl.) #404
Church Hymnal, Fifth Edition #99
Complete Anglican Hymns Old and New #364TextPage Scan
Complete Mission Praise #385
Hymns and Psalms: a Methodist and ecumenical hymn book #264
Hymns for Today's Church (2nd ed.) #213Text
Hymns to the Living God #195Text
Sing Glory: Hymns, Psalms and Songs for a New Century #323
Singing the Faith #357
The Book of Hymns (A fresh anthology of favourite hymns) #48
The Cyber Hymnal #3383TextScoreAudio
The United Methodist Hymnal #193TextFlexScoreAudioPage Scan
The United Methodist Hymnal Music Supplement #149Text
The United Methodist Hymnal Music Supplement II #67Page Scan
Together in Song: Australian hymn book II #218
찬송과 예배 = Chansong gwa yebae = Come, Let Us Worship: the Korean-English Presbyterian hymnal and service book #199
Include 235 pre-1979 instances



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