New Year's Day

Full Text

1 Now, gracious Lord, thine arm reveal,
And make thy glory known;
Now let us all thy presence feel,
And soften hearts of stone!

2 Help us to venture near thy throne,
And plead a Savior's name;
For all that we can call our own,
Is vanity and shame.

3 From all the guilt of former sin
May mercy set us free;
And let the year we now begin,
Begin and end with thee.

4 Send down thy spirit from above,
That saints may love thee more;
And sinners now may learn to love
Who never loved before.

5 And when before thee we appear
In our eternal home;
May growing numbers worship here,
And praise thee in our room.

The Christian's duty, exhibited in a series of hymns, 1791

Author: John Newton

Newton, John, who was born in London, July 24, 1725, and died there Dec. 21, 1807, occupied an unique position among the founders of the Evangelical School, due as much to the romance of his young life and the striking history of his conversion, as to his force of character. His mother, a pious Dissenter, stored his childish mind with Scripture, but died when he was seven years old. At the age of eleven, after two years' schooling, during which he learned the rudiments of Latin, he went to sea with his father. His life at sea teems with wonderful escapes, vivid dreams, and sailor recklessness. He grew into an abandoned and godless sailor. The religious fits of his boyhood changed into settled infidelity, through the study of Shaftesbury and… Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: Now, gracious Lord, thine arm reveal
Title: New Year's Day
Author: John Newton
Language: English

Notes

Now gracious Lord, Thine arm reveal. J. Newton. [The New Year.] The first of thirteen hymns to be sung "Before Annual Sermons to Young People, on New Years' Evenings," first published in the Olney Hymns, 1779, Bk. ii., No. 7., in 5 stanzas of 4 lines, and headed "Prayer for a Blessing." (Original text, Hymnal Companion, No. 90.) Its use is very extensive in all English-speaking countries; it has also been translated into several languages.

--John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907)

Tune

GRONINGEN


ST. PETER (Reinagle)

Composed by Alexander R. Reinagle (b. Brighton, Sussex, England, 1799; d. Kidlington, Oxfordshire, England, 1877), ST. PETER was published as a setting for Psalm 118 in Reinagle's Psalm Tunes for the Voice and Pianoforte (c. 1836). The tune first appeared with Newton's text in Hymns Ancient and Mode…

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MARTYRDOM (Wilson)

MARTYRDOM was originally an eighteenth-century Scottish folk melody used for the ballad "Helen of Kirkconnel." Hugh Wilson (b. Fenwick, Ayrshire, Scotland, c. 1766; d. Duntocher, Scotland, 1824) adapted MARTYRDOM into a hymn tune in duple meter around 1800. A triple-meter version of the tune was fir…

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Timeline




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