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EAST ACKLAM

EAST ACKLAM

Composer: Francis Jackson (1957)
Published in 16 hymnals


Audio files: MIDI

Composer: Francis Jackson

(no biographical information available about Francis Jackson.) Go to person page >

Tune Information

Composer: Francis Jackson (1957)
Meter: 8.4.8.4.8.8.8.4
Incipit: 12345 63251 23345
Key: D Major
Copyright: © 1960, Francis Jackson

Notes

Francis Jackson (b. Malton, Yorkshire, England, 1917) wrote EAST ACKLAM in 1957 at York Minster Abbey, where he had a long and distinguished career as organist and music master (1946-1982). The tune's name refers to the hamlet northeast of York, England, where Jackson has lived since 1982. Jackson received his early musical training at the York Minster School, later studied with Edward Bairstow, and received his doctorate from Durham University (1940). From 1947 to 1980 he conducted both the York Musical Society and the York Symphony Orchestra. He has published a wide array of organ and church music and was very popular as an organ recitalist.

Jackson originally wrote the tune as a setting for Reginald Heber's (PHH 249) "God that madest earth and heaven," which was usually sung to the popular Welsh tune AR HYD YNOS. Now matched to Pratt Green's text in several modern hymnals, EAST ACKLAM was first published in the British supplement Hymns and Songs (1969).

The tune has several striking features: the hammer-blow chords at the end of lines 1, 2, and 4; the melodic sequences; and the stunning melodic rise to the climax in lines and 4. Although good choirs may enjoy the challenge of the harmony, the tune is best sung in unison by congregations. Use solid accompaniment and observe a ritardando, at the very end of stanza 3.

--Psalter Hymnal Handbook, 1987

Instances

Instances (1 - 15 of 15)Text InfoTune InfoTextScoreFlexScoreAudioPage Scan
Ancient and Modern: hymns and songs for refreshing worship #284Text
Church Hymnary (4th ed.) #231Text
Common Praise: A new edition of Hymns Ancient and Modern #254
Complete Anglican Hymns Old and New #185
Hymnal 1982: according to the use of the Episcopal Church #424Text
Hymns for Today's Church (2nd ed.) #286Text
Hymns of the Saints: Reorganized Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints #73
Hymns Old and New (Rev. and Enl.) #197
New English Praise: a supplement to the New English Hymnal #621
Presbyterian Hymnal: hymns, psalms, and spiritual songs #553Text
Psalter Hymnal (Gray) #455Text InfoTune InfoTextAudio
Rejoice in the Lord #21Text
Singing the Faith #124a
The United Methodist Hymnal #97Text
Worship (3rd ed.) #562
Include 1 pre-1979 instance



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