12492. Thou, Jesus Christ, Didst Man Become

1 Thou, Jesus Christ, didst man become
From death us to deliver;
Thy pitying eye beheld our doom,
That we were lost forever;
Thou gavest hope in direst need
When death and hell with gaping greed
Were ready to devour us.

2 Thou couldst not bear that Satan’s might
Had in its grasp enslaved us;
In pity Thou didst for us fight,
And hast in mercy saved us.
From Heaven Thou cam’st for our release,
To purchase our eternal peace
By bitter death and suffering.

3 And Thou hast taught us in Thy Word
That faith shall life inherit,
For Thou art merciful, O Lord,
And sav’st us by Thy merit,
If we but simply do believe
That all Thy children shall receive
The blessings Thou hast promised.

4 Our brother Thou art now become—
An honor beyond measure!
Thou wouldst our life with mercy crown,
And give us richest treasure.
The world’s contempt we need not fear,
God’s Son is now our brother dear,
What power can now destroy us?

5 All praise to Thee eternally
For all Thy gracious favor;
We are God’s children now with Thee,
Lord Jesus Christ, our Savior!
Well may we one and all rejoice,
And praise our God with heart and voice;
He is our gracious Father.

Text Information
First Line: Thou, Jesus Christ, didst man become
Title: Thou, Jesus Christ, Didst Man Become
Author: Olavus Petri (1526)
Translator: George H. Trabert
Meter: 87.87.887
Language: English
Source: Swedish; Tr.: Hymnal and Order of Service (Rock Island, IL: Lutheran Augustana Book Concern, 1899)
Copyright: Public Domain
Tune Information
Name: NUN FREUT EUCH
Composer: Martin Luther (1535)
Meter: 87.87.887
Key: G Major or modal
Source: Geistliche Lieder by Joseph Klug (Wittenberg, Germany, 1535)
Copyright: Public Domain



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