827

Now the Feast and Celebration

Scripture References

Further Reflections on Scripture References

This song reminds us that the celebration of the Lord’s Supper is just that: a celebration – not merely the somber remembering of Christ’s work. This text, harkening to the great feast in Revelation, tells the Paschal story. Then each time the refrain returns, the sparkling, gentle doxology lifts all the praise and glory back to God.

 

Sing!  A New Creation

827

Now the Feast and Celebration

Call to Worship

Worthy is the Lamb that was slaughtered
to receive power and wealth and wisdom and might
and honor and glory and blessing!
—Revelation 5:12, NRSV
— Worship Sourcebook Edition Two

The Lord who calls us to worship today is the same Jesus
who refused the temptation to worship the evil one.
Rather than receive the glorious kingdoms of this world,
he endured the shame of the cross,
and today is Lord of lords and King of kings.
Now are gathered in him
all the treasures of wisdom and knowledge,
glory and power.
With the saints of all ages we say,
“Worthy is the Lamb, who was slain,
to receive power and wealth and wisdom
and strength and honor and glory and praise!”
—based on Colossians 2:3; Revelation 5:12, NIV
[Reformed Worship 27:40]
— Worship Sourcebook Edition Two

Blessing/Benediction

Worthy is the Lamb that was slaughtered
to receive power and wealth and wisdom and might
and honor and glory and blessing!
—Revelation 5:12, NRSV
— Worship Sourcebook Edition Two

Additional Prayers

A Prayer of Anticipation
God of our future, we look forward to the day when we can eat and drink with Jesus in the fullness of your kingdom. Today the bread from many fields and the grapes from many hills are for us both satisfaction and appetizer. Bless this holy meal and bless us, we pray, as we lean forward toward your heavenly banquet with Jesus. Amen.
— Cornelius Plantinga, Jr.
827

Now the Feast and Celebration

Tune Information

Name
NOW THE FEAST
Key
E Major
Meter
irregular
827

Now the Feast and Celebration

Hymn Story/Background

This song reminds us that the celebration of the Lord’s Supper is just that—a celebration, not merely the somber remembering of Christ’s work. This setting, now widely sung ecumenically, is part of one of Marty Haugen’s best-known settings of the Lutheran communion service that was commissioned by the campus ministry at Pacific Lutheran University in Tacoma, Washington, for the worshiping community there; it was published by GIA Publications, Inc. in 1990.
 
Particularly appropriate during Eastertide before the Great Prayer of Thanksgiving, this text, harkening to the great feast in Revelation, tells the Pascal story in verses that each have their own musical setting, each time coming back to the sparkling refrain that lifts the glory and praise to God. Consider introducing by having a choir or worship team sing the verses (perhaps from the published SATB anthem), with everyone joining in on the refrain. This is not a song to introduce once and put away; consider singing the seven weeks of Eastertide, until the refrain soars and the text is committed to memory. Many congregations have learned and love singing the entire song, verses and all. 
— Emily Brink

Author and Composer Information

Marty Haugen (b. 1950), is a prolific liturgical composer with many songs included in hymnals across the liturgical spectrum of North American hymnals and beyond, with many songs translated into different languages. He was raised in the American Lutheran Church, received a BA in psychology from Luther College, yet found his first position as a church musician in a Roman Catholic parish at a time when the Roman Catholic Church was undergoing profound liturgical and musical changes after Vatican II. Finding a vocation in that parish to provide accessible songs for worship, he continued to compose and to study, receiving an MA in pastoral studies at the University of St. Thomas in St. Paul Minnesota. A number of liturgical settings were prepared for the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America and more than 400 of his compositions are available from several publishers, especially GIA Publications, who also produced some 30 recordings of his songs. He is composer-in-residence at Mayflower Community Congregational Church in Minneapolis and continues to compose and travel to speak and teach at worship events around the world. 
— Emily Brink
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