828

O Christ, Our Hope, Our Heart's Desire

Full Text

1 O Christ, our hope, our heart's desire,
redemption's only spring,
Creator of the world art thou,
its Savior and its King.

2 How vast the mercy and the love
which laid our sins on thee,
and led thee to a cruel death
to set thy people free.

3 But now the bands of death are burst,
the ransom has been paid;
and thou art on thy Father's throne,
in glorious robes arrayed.

4 O Christ, be thou our lasting joy,
our ever great reward;
our only glory may it be
to glory in the Lord!

5 All praise to you, ascended Lord;
all glory ever be
to Father, Son, and Spirit blest
through all eternity.

see more

Scripture References

Further Reflections on Scripture References

This short but comprehensive text honors Christ as creator of the world (st. 1); meditates on his love, which led to his atoning death (st. 2); voices our worship to the ascended Christ for his victory over death (st. 3); and offers our prayer to keep Christ central in our lives (st. 4).

 

Bert Polman, Psalter Hymnal Handbook

828

O Christ, Our Hope, Our Heart's Desire

Assurance

The saying is sure and worthy of full acceptance,
that Jesus Christ came into the world to save sinners.
He himself bore our sins in his body on the cross,
so that we, free from sins, might live for righteousness;
by his wounds we have been healed.
—from 1 Timothy 1:15; 1 Peter 2:24, NRSV
— Worship Sourcebook Edition Two

Jesus himself bore our sins in his body on the cross,
so that, free from sins, we might live for righteousness;
by his wounds you have been healed.
—from 1 Peter 2:24, NRSV
— Worship Sourcebook Edition Two

Additional Prayers

A Prayer of Acclamation and Thanks
Lord Jesus Christ, you are God from God, light from light, and yet a friend of sinners. You are both shepherd and lamb, prince and slave, savior and sacrifice. But most of all, you are our hope and heart’s desire. And so we give you thanks that you fill us with your blessed presence. Amen.
— Cornelius Plantinga, Jr.
828

O Christ, Our Hope, Our Heart's Desire

Tune Information

Name
MANOAH
Key
F Major
Meter
8.6.8.6
828

O Christ, Our Hope, Our Heart's Desire

Hymn Story/Background

Although manuscript copies do not appear until the eleventh century, the Latin source for this Ascension text ('Jesu, nostra redemptio, amor et desiderium") is thought to date from the seventh or eighth century. A five-stanza English translation by John Chandler was published in his Hymns of the Primitive Church (1837), and a doxology stanza was added later. Of those stanzas, 1-3 and 5 are included with a few word changes.
 
This short but comprehensive text honors Christ as creator of the world (st. 1); meditates on his love, which led to his atoning death (st. 2); voices our worship to the ascended Christ for his victory over death (st. 3); offers our prayer to keep Christ central in our lives (st. 4); and concludes with a Trinitatian doxology (st. 5).
 
MANOAH was first published in Henry W. Greatorex's Collection of Psalm and Hymn Tunes (1851). This anthology (later editions had alternate titles) contained one of the best tune collections of its era and included thirty-seven original compositions and arrangements by compiler Greatorex as well as melodies by his father, Thomas, and grandfather Anthony. Because no other source has been traced, it is believed that Greatorex composed MANOAH.
 
The composer gave arbitrary names to his tunes: Manoah was the father of Samson in the Old Testament. This well-crafted common-meter tune features some repetition of melodic motives and a harmonization that invites part singing. Sing in harmony in two long lines rather than four short phrases. 
— Bert Polman

Author Information

John Chandler (b. Widey, Godalming, Surrey, England, 1806; d. Putney, Surrey, 1876) spent most of his life in Widey, where his father was the vicar. After theological studies at Corpus Christi College, Oxford, England, he assumed his father's position in Widey in 1837. Noting that many of the prayers of the Anglican Church were English translations of early Latin prayers, Chandler decided that the church should sing hymns from that era as well. Because he did not find many suitable English translations, he made his own and published them in The Hymns of the Primitive Church (1837) and, with revisions, in The Hymns of the Church, mostly Primitive (1841). Some of the Latin hymns he translated, however, were not as ancient as the words "Primitive Church" might suggest; he also included translations of hymns from the Paris Breviary (1736).
— Bert Polman

Composer Information

Henry W. Greatorex (b. Burton-on-Trent, Staffordshire, England, 1813; d. Charleston, SC, 1858) received his early music training from his father, who was organist at Westminster Abbey. After moving to the United States in 1839, he served as organist at the Center Congregational Church and at St. John's Church, both in Hartford, Connecticut. He accepted the position of organist at St. Paul's Episcopal Church around 1846 and later became organist and choirmaster of the Calvary Episcopal Church, both in New York City. His final musical position was at the Episcopal Church in Charleston.
— Bert Polman
You have access to this FlexScore.
Download:
Are parts of this score outside of your desired range? Try transposing this FlexScore.
General Settings
Stanza Selection
Voice Selection
Text size:
Music size:
Transpose (Half Steps):
Capo:
Contacting server...
Contacting server...

Questions? Check out the FAQ

A separate copy of this score must be purchased for each choir member. If this score will be projected or included in a bulletin, usage must be reported to a licensing agent (e.g. CCLI, OneLicense, etc).

This is a preview of your FlexScore.
Suggestions or corrections? Contact us



Advertisements


It looks like you are using an ad-blocker. Ad revenue helps keep us running. Please consider white-listing Hymnary.org or subscribing to eliminate ads entirely and help support Hymnary.org.