945

Thuma mina (Send Me, Lord)

Scripture References

Confessions and Statements of Faith References

Further Reflections on Confessions and Statements of Faith References

According to the confessions, Christian worshipers are called to continue in service. Heidelberg Catechism, Lord’s Day 12, Question and Answer 32 instructs us to think of ourselves as “a member of Christ…[who] share in his anointing.” So we profess “I am anointed to confess his name, to present myself to him as a living sacrifice of thanks, to strive with a free conscience against sin and the devil in this life, and afterward to reign with Christ over all creation for eternity.” We serve him with good works, “…so that with our whole lives we may show that we are thankful to God for his benefits, so that he may be praised through us, so that we may be assured of our faith by its fruits, and so that by our godly living our neighbors may be won over to Christ” (Heidelberg Catechism, Lord’s Day 32, Question and Answer 86). And so we are moved to “…embrace God’s mission in [our] neighborhoods and in the world...” (Our World Belongs to God, paragraph 41). Christians, therefore, leave worship believing that “to follow this Lord is to serve him wherever we are without fitting in, light in darkness, salt in a spoiling world” (Our World Belongs to God paragraph 43).

945

Thuma mina (Send Me, Lord)

Additional Prayers

A Petitionary Prayer
 
Lord Jesus Christ, the world needs witnesses to your kingdom.
Send me, Jesus, send me.
We must know where to go in the world.
Lead me, Jesus, lead me.
To fill our calling we need your loving power.
Fill me, Jesus, fill me. Amen.
— Cornelius Plantinga, Jr.
945

Thuma mina (Send Me, Lord)

Tune Information

Name
THUMA MINA
Key
F Major
Meter
4.4.7

Recordings

945

Thuma mina (Send Me, Lord)

Hymn Story/Background

There are different versions of this anonymous South African freedom song that arose during the days of apartheid.  This particular version was originally in the Nguni language used by both Zulu and Xhosa people, and found its way to North America in a collection of songs entitled Freedom Is Coming (1984) gathered by Anders Nyberg from Sweden. The dialogue structure between the song leader (“enlivener”) and the congregation encourages all to join in, and is short enough that it can be sung without need for written notation; in fact, the leader might well expand the text according to the particular situation.  
— Emily Brink
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