Person Results

Scripture:luke 2:15-20
In:people
Showing 51 - 60 of 453Results Per Page: 102050

Arthur Sullivan

1842 - 1900 Person Name: Arthur Seymour Sullivan (1842-1900) Scripture: Luke 2:1-20 Adapter of "NOEL" in Church Hymnary (4th ed.) Arthur Seymour Sullivan (b Lambeth, London. England. 1842; d. Westminster, London, 1900) was born of an Italian mother and an Irish father who was an army band­master and a professor of music. Sullivan entered the Chapel Royal as a chorister in 1854. He was elected as the first Mendelssohn scholar in 1856, when he began his studies at the Royal Academy of Music in London. He also studied at the Leipzig Conservatory (1858-1861) and in 1866 was appointed professor of composition at the Royal Academy of Music. Early in his career Sullivan composed oratorios and music for some Shakespeare plays. However, he is best known for writing the music for lyrics by William S. Gilbert, which produced popular operettas such as H.M.S. Pinafore (1878), The Pirates of Penzance (1879), The Mikado (1884), and Yeomen of the Guard (1888). These operettas satirized the court and everyday life in Victorian times. Although he com­posed some anthems, in the area of church music Sullivan is best remembered for his hymn tunes, written between 1867 and 1874 and published in The Hymnary (1872) and Church Hymns (1874), both of which he edited. He contributed hymns to A Hymnal Chiefly from The Book of Praise (1867) and to the Presbyterian collection Psalms and Hymns for Divine Worship (1867). A complete collection of his hymns and arrangements was published posthumously as Hymn Tunes by Arthur Sullivan (1902). Sullivan steadfastly refused to grant permission to those who wished to make hymn tunes from the popular melodies in his operettas. Bert Polman

William J. Kirkpatrick

1838 - 1921 Person Name: William J. Kirkpatrick, 1838-1921 Scripture: Luke 2:1-20 Composer of "CRADLE SONG" in With One Voice William J. Kirkpatrick (b. Duncannon, PA, 1838; d. Philadelphia, PA, 1921) received his musical training from his father and several other private teachers. A carpenter by trade, he engaged in the furniture business from 1862 to 1878. He left that profession to dedicate his life to music, serving as music director at Grace Methodist Church in Philadelphia. Kirkpatrick compiled some one hundred gospel song collections; his first, Devotional Melodies (1859), was published when he was only twenty-one years old. Many of these collections were first published by the John Hood Company and later by Kirkpatrick's own Praise Publishing Company, both in Philadelphia. Bert Polman

Cecil Frances Alexander

1818 - 1895 Person Name: Cecil Frances Alexander (1818-1895) Scripture: Luke 2:1-20 Author of "Once in Royal David's City" in Common Praise (1998) As a small girl, Cecil Frances Humphries (b. Redcross, County Wicklow, Ireland, 1818; Londonderry, Ireland, 1895) wrote poetry in her school's journal. In 1850 she married Rev. William Alexander, who later became the Anglican primate (chief bishop) of Ireland. She showed her concern for disadvantaged people by traveling many miles each day to visit the sick and the poor, providing food, warm clothes, and medical supplies. She and her sister also founded a school for the deaf. Alexander was strongly influenced by the Oxford Movement and by John Keble's Christian Year. Her first book of poetry, Verses for Seasons, was a "Christian Year" for children. She wrote hymns based on the Apostles' Creed, baptism, the Lord's Supper, the Ten Commandments, and prayer, writing in simple language for children. Her more than four hundred hymn texts were published in Verses from the Holy Scripture (1846), Hymns for Little Children (1848), and Hymns Descriptive and Devotional ( 1858). Bert Polman ================== Alexander, Cecil Frances, née Humphreys, second daughter of the late Major John Humphreys, Miltown House, co. Tyrone, Ireland, b. 1823, and married in 1850 to the Rt. Rev. W. Alexander, D.D., Bishop of Derry and Raphoe. Mrs. Alexander's hymns and poems number nearly 400. They are mostly for children, and were published in her Verses for Holy Seasons, with Preface by Dr. Hook, 1846; Poems on Subjects in the Old Testament, pt. i. 1854, pt. ii. 1857; Narrative Hymns for Village Schools, 1853; Hymns for Little Children, 1848; Hymns Descriptive and Devotional, 1858; The Legend of the Golden Prayers 1859; Moral Songs, N.B.; The Lord of the Forest and his Vassals, an Allegory, &c.; or contributed to the Lyra Anglicana, the S.P.C.K. Psalms and Hymns, Hymns Ancient & Modern, and other collections. Some of the narrative hymns are rather heavy, and not a few of the descriptive are dull, but a large number remain which have won their way to the hearts of the young, and found a home there. Such hymns as "In Nazareth in olden time," "All things bright and beautiful," "Once in Royal David's city," "There is a green hill far away," "Jesus calls us o'er the tumult," "The roseate hues of early dawn," and others that might be named, are deservedly popular and are in most extensive use. Mrs. Alexander has also written hymns of a more elaborate character; but it is as a writer for children that she has excelled. - John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907) =============== Alexander, Cecil F., née Humphreys, p. 38, ii. Additional hymns to those already noted in this Dictionary are in common use:— 1. Christ has ascended up again. (1853.) Ascension. 2. His are the thousand sparkling rills. (1875.) Seven Words on the Cross (Fifth Word). 3. How good is the Almighty God. (1S48.) God, the Father. 4. In [a] the rich man's garden. (1853.) Easter Eve. 5. It was early in the morning. (1853.) Easter Day. 6. So be it, Lord; the prayers are prayed. (1848.) Trust in God. 7. Saw you never in the twilight? (1853.) Epiphany. 8. Still bright and blue doth Jordan flow. (1853.) Baptism of Our Lord. 9. The angels stand around Thy throne. (1848.) Submission to the Will of God. 10. The saints of God are holy men. (1848.) Communion of Saints. 11. There is one Way and only one. (1875.) SS. Philip and James. 12. Up in heaven, up in heaven. (1848.) Ascension. 13. We are little Christian children. (1848.) Holy Trinity. 14. We were washed in holy water. (1848.) Holy Baptism. 15. When of old the Jewish mothers. (1853.) Christ's Invitation to Children. 16. Within the Churchyard side by side. (1848.) Burial. Of the above hymns those dated 1848 are from Mrs. Alexander's Hymns for Little Children; those dated 1853, from Narrative Hymns, and those dated 1875 from the 1875 edition of Hymns Ancient & Modern. Several new hymns by Mrs. Alexander are included in the 1891 Draft Appendix to the Irish Church Hymnal. --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology, Appendix, Part II (1907) ============= Alexander, Cecil F. , p. 38, ii. Mrs. Alexander died at Londonderry, Oct. 12, 1895. A number of her later hymns are in her Poems, 1896, which were edited by Archbishop Alexander. --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology, New Supplement (1907) See also in:Hymn Writers of the Church

Henry J. Gauntlett

1805 - 1876 Scripture: Luke 2:18 Composer of "IRBY" in Hymns for the Living Church Henry J. Gauntlett (b. Wellington, Shropshire, July 9, 1805; d. London, England, February 21, 1876) When he was nine years old, Henry John Gauntlett (b. Wellington, Shropshire, England, 1805; d. Kensington, London, England, 1876) became organist at his father's church in Olney, Buckinghamshire. At his father's insistence he studied law, practicing it until 1844, after which he chose to devote the rest of his life to music. He was an organist in various churches in the London area and became an important figure in the history of British pipe organs. A designer of organs for William Hill's company, Gauntlett extend­ed the organ pedal range and in 1851 took out a patent on electric action for organs. Felix Mendelssohn chose him to play the organ part at the first performance of Elijah in Birmingham, England, in 1846. Gauntlett is said to have composed some ten thousand hymn tunes, most of which have been forgotten. Also a supporter of the use of plainchant in the church, Gauntlett published the Gregorian Hymnal of Matins and Evensong (1844). Bert Polman

Johann G. Ebeling

1637 - 1676 Person Name: Johann Georg Ebeling Scripture: Luke 2:8-20 Composer of "WARUM SOLLT' ICH" in The Presbyterian Hymnal Born: Ju­ly 8, 1637, Lü­ne­burg, Ger­ma­ny. Died: De­cem­ber 4, 1676, Stet­tin, Ger­ma­ny (now Szcze­cin, Po­land).

Theodore Baker

1851 - 1934 Person Name: Theodore Baker, 1851-1934 Scripture: Luke 2:1-18 Translator (sts. 1-2 of "Lo, How a Rose E'er Blooming" in Lutheran Service Book

Richard Proulx

1937 - 2010 Person Name: Richard Proulx, 1937-2010 Scripture: Luke 2:15-19 Harmonizer of "PLEADING SAVIOR" in Gather (3rd ed.) Richard Proulx (b. St. Paul, MN, April 3, 1937; d. Chicago, IL, February 18, 2010). A composer, conductor, and teacher, Proulx was director of music at the Holy Name Cathedral in Chicago, Illinois (1980-1997); before that he was organist and choirmaster at St. Thomas' Episcopal Church in Seattle, Washington. He contributed his expertise to the Roman Catholic Worship III (1986), The Episcopal Hymnal 1982, The United Methodist Hymnal (1989), and the ecumenical A New Hymnal for Colleges and Schools (1992). He was educated at the University of Minnesota, MacPhail College of Music in Minneapolis, Minnesota, St. John's Abbey in Collegeville, Minnesota, and the Royal School of Church Music in England. He composed more than 250 works. Bert Polman

Ronald F. Krisman

Person Name: Ronald F. Krisman, n. 1946 Scripture: Luke 2:15-16 Paraphraser of "Pastores, a Belén (Let's Go to Bethlehem)" in Oramos Cantando = We Pray In Song

Federico Fliedner

1845 - 1901 Person Name: Federico Fliedner, 1845-1901 Scripture: Luke 2:7-16 Translator (Spanish) of "Silent Night, Holy Night" in Lutheran Service Book [Friedrich Ludwig Fliedner, Fritz Fliedner] Born: June 10, 1845, Kaiserswerth, Düsseldorf, Germany. Died: April 25, 1901, Madrid, Spain, of typhus. Buried: Civil cemetery, Madrid, Spain. Son of Theodor Fliedner, founder of the Kaiserswerth Deaconess Institute, Federico was educated at the Gymnasium in Gütersloh, studied theology at Halle (1864-46) and earned his PhD at Tübingen (1867). He served as a nurse in the Austro-Prussian war of 1866, and taught school for a year in rural Hilden. After ordination in 1870, he left Germany to be a missionary to Spain, settling in Madrid and becoming a chaplain at the German embassy. He learned Spanish, attended a Spanish high school, and studied medicine at the Universidad Central. Fliedner was instrumental in creating what is now known as the Iglesia Evangélica Española. In 1873, Fliedner founded the Librería Nacional y Extranjera, an extensive collection of text books and periodicals. Among these was The Children’s Friend, published from 1874 to 1939. Fliedner wrote biographies of John Howard, Elizabeth Fry, missionary-explorer David Livingstone, Martin Luther (1878), and his own parents, Theodore Fliedner of Kaiserswerth (1883) and Caroline Fliedner of Kaiserswerth (1883). He also wrote an autobiography, published first in German in two volumes (Aus meinem Leben, 1901-03), then translated into Spanish and published posthumously in the Christian Magazine (Nos. 513 to 553). He started a Spanish translation of the New Testament with notes from Frenchman Edouard Faivre. --www.hymntime.com/tch

George Paul Simmonds

1890 - 1991 Person Name: George P. Simmonds, 1890-1991 Scripture: Luke 2:16 Translator of "Away in a Manger (Allá en el pesebre)" in Santo, Santo, Santo At four years, George sang hymns with great devotion and enthusiasm. When he was ten he felt called to be a missionary. He retained his love for the Lord and for music throughout his life. So much so, that after the age of one hundred years old even sang solos in large meetings and on television. He began his work as a missionary, along with his wife, Nessie, in Ecuador. Then explored the Amazon area and across the continent. Collaborated in the compilation of "Hymns of the Christian Life." He also worked with the Bible Societies in several South American countries. He then served as pastor of a Hispanic church in the United States of America. He was a prolific translator of 800 hymns and choral songs. He used some pseudonyms as G. Paul S. and J. Paul Simon. --p5p5.cl.tripod.com/CuartetoPlenitud/historia_himnos =========== In 1964 he edited El Himnario which was to become the most widely used Protestant Hispanic hymnbook of this century. Throughout his ministry and particularly in his later years, Simmonds dedicated himself to bring Hispanic hymnody into the Anglo church through his publishing company, Cánticos Escogidos, first based in Albuquerque, New Mexico, and later in Duarte, California. The Presbyerian Hymnal Companion, 1993

Pages


Export as CSV



Advertisements


It looks like you are using an ad-blocker. Ad revenue helps keep us running. Please consider white-listing Hymnary.org or subscribing to eliminate ads entirely and help support Hymnary.org.