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Frank M. Davis

1839 - 1896 Hymnal Number: d90 Author of "Death is there" in The Garner Frank Marion Davis USA 1839-1896. Born at Marcellus, NY, he became a teacher and professor of voice, a choirmaster and a good singer. He traveled extensively, living in Marcellus, NY, Vicksburg, MS, Baltimore, MD, Cincinnati, OH, Burr Oak and Findley, MI. He compiled and published several song books: “New Pearls of Song” (1877), “Notes of Praise” (1890), “Crown of gold” (1892), “Always welcome” (1881), “Songs of love and praise #5” (1898), “Notes of praise”, and “Brightest glory”. He never married. John Perry

Samuel Stennett

1727 - 1795 Hymnal Number: d94 Author of "We will rest in the fair and happy land" in The Garner Samuel Stennett was born at Exeter, in 1727. His father was pastor of a Baptist congregation in that city; afterwards of the Baptist Chapel, Little Wild Street, London. In this latter pastorate the son succeeded the father in 1758. He died in 1795. Dr. Stennett was the author of several doctrinal works, and a few hymns. --Annotations of the Hymnal, Charles Hutchins, M.A. 1872. ====================== Stennett, Samuel, D.D., grandson of Joseph Stennett, named above, and son of the Rev. Joseph Stennett, D.D., was born most pro;bably in 1727, at Exeter, where his father was at that time a Baptist minister. When quite young he removed to London, his father having become pastor of the Baptist Church in Little Wild Street, Lincoln's Inn Fields. In 1748, Samuel Stennett became assistant to his father in the ministry, and in 1758 succeeded him in the pastoral office at Little Wild Street. From that time until his death, on Aug. 24, 1795, he held a very prominent position among the Dissenting ministers of London. He was much respected by some of the statesmen of the time, and used his influence with them in support of the principles of religious freedom. The celebrated John Howard was a member of his congregation and an attached friend. In 1763, the University of Aberdeen conferred on him the degree of D.D. Dr. S. Stennett's prose publications consist of volumes of sermons, and pamphlets on Baptism and on Nonconformist Disabilities. He wrote one or two short poems, and contributed 38 hymns to the collection of his friend, Dr. Rippon (1787). His poetical genius was not of the highest order, and his best hymns have neither the originality nor the vigour of some of his grandfather's. The following, however, are pleasing in sentiment and expression, and are in common use more especially in Baptist congregations:— 1. And have I, Christ, no love for Thee? Love for Christ desired. 2. And will the offended God again? The Body the Temple of the Holy Ghost. 3. As on the Cross the Saviour hung. The Thief on the Cross. 4. Behold the leprous Jew. The healing of the Leper. 5. Come, every pious heart. Praise to Christ. 6. Father, at Thy call, I come. Lent. 7. Great God, amid the darksome night. God, a Sun. 8. Great God, what hosts of angels stand. Ministry of Angels. 9. Here at Thy Table, Lord, we meet. Holy Communion. 10. How charming is the place. Public Worship. 11. How shall the sons of men appear? Acceptance through Christ alone. 12. How soft the words my [the] Saviour speaks. Early Piety. 13. How various and how new. Divine Providence. 14. Not all the nobles of the earth. Christians as Sons of God. 15. On Jordan's stormy banks I stand. Heaven anticipated. 16. Prostrate, dear Jesus, at thy feet. Lent. Sometimes, "Dear Saviour, prostrate at Thy feet." 17. Should bounteous nature kindly pour. The greatest of these is Love. From this, "Had I the gift of tongues," st. iii., is taken. 18. Thy counsels of redeeming grace. Holy Scripture. From "Let avarice, from shore to shore." 19. Thy life 1 read, my dearest Lord. Death in Infancy. From this "'Tis Jesus speaks, I fold, says He." 20. 'Tis finished! so the Saviour cried. Good Friday. 21. To Christ, the Lord, let every tongue. Praise of Christ. From this,"Majestic sweetness sits enthroned," st. iii., is taken. 22. To God, my Saviour, and my King. Renewing Grace. 23. To God, the universal King. Praise to God. 24. What wisdom, majesty, and grace. The Gospel. Sometimes, “What majesty and grace." 25. Where two or three with sweet accord. Before the Sermon. 26. Why should a living man complain? Affliction. From this, "Lord, see what floods of sorrow rise," st. iii., is taken. 27. With tears of anguish I lament. Lent. 28. Yonder amazing sight I see. Good Friday. All these hymns, with others by Stennett, were given in Rippon's Baptist Selection, 1787, a few having previously appeared in A Collection of Hymns for the use of Christians of all Denominations, London. Printed for the Booksellers, 1782; and No. 16, in the 1778 Supplement to the 3rd edition of the Bristol Baptist Selection of Ash and Evans. The whole of Stennett's poetical pieces and hymns were included in vol. ii. of his Works, together with a Memoir, by W. J. Jones. 4 vols., 1824. [Rev. W. R. Stevenson, M.A.] --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907)

Augustus Toplady

1740 - 1778 Person Name: Augustus M. Toplady, 1740-1778 Hymnal Number: d99 Author of "Rock of Ages, cleft for me, Let me hide myself in Thee" in The Garner Toplady, Augustus Montague, the author of "Rock of Ages," was born at Farnham, Surrey, November 4, 1740. His father was an officer in the British army. His mother was a woman of remarkable piety. He prepared for the university at Westminster School, and subsequently was graduated at Trinity College, Dublin. While on a visit in Ireland in his sixteenth year he was awakened and converted at a service held in a barn in Codymain. The text was Ephesians ii. 13: "But now, in Christ Jesus, ye who sometimes were far off are made nigh by the blood of Christ." The preacher was an illiterate but warm-hearted layman named Morris. Concerning this experience Toplady wrote: "Strange that I, who had so long sat under the means of grace in England, should be brought nigh unto God in an obscure part of Ireland, amidst a handful of God's people met together in a barn, and under the ministry of one who could hardly spell his name. Surely this is the Lord's doing, and it is marvelous." In 1758, through the influence of sermons preached by Dr. Manton on the seventeenth chapter of John, he became an extreme Calvinist in his theology, which brought him later into conflict with Mr. Wesley and the Methodists. He was ordained to the ministry in the Church of England in 1762, and in 1768 he became vicar of Broadhembury, a small living in Devonshire, which he held until his death. The last two or three years of his life he passed in London, where he preached in a chapel on Orange Street. His last sickness was of such a character that he was able to make a repeated and emphatic dying testimony. A short time before his death he asked his physician what he thought. The reply was that his pulse showed that his heart was beating weaker every day. Toplady replied with a smile: "Why, that is a good sign that my death is fast approaching; and, blessed be God, I can add that my heart beats stronger and stronger every day for glory." To another friend he said: "O, my dear sir, I cannot tell you the comforts I feel in my soul; they are past expression. . . . My prayers are all converted into praise." He died of consumption August 11, 1778. His volume of Psalms and Hymns for Public and Private Worship was published in 1776. Of the four hundred and nineteen hymns which it contained, several were his own productions. If on a quiet sea 446 Rock of ages, cleft for me 279 Hymn Writers of the Church, 1915 by Charles S. Nutter =============================================== Toplady, Augustus Montague, M.A. The life of Toplady has been repeatedly and fully written, the last, a somewhat discursive and slackly put together book, yet matterful, by W. Winters (1872). Summarily, these data may be here given: he was born at Farnham, in Surrey, on November 4, 1740. His father, Richard Toplady, was a Major in the British array, and was killed at the siege of Carthagena (1741) soon after the birth of his son. His widowed mother placed him at the renowned Westminster school, London. By-and-by circumstances led her to Ireland, and young Augustus was entered at Trinity College, Dublin, where he completed his academical training, ultimately graduating M.A. He also received his "new birth" in Ireland under remarkable conditions, as he himself tells us with oddly mixed humility and lofty self-estimate, as "a favourite of heaven," common to his school:— "Strange that I who had so long sat under the means of grace in England should be brought right unto God in an obscure part of Ireland, midst a handful of people met together in a barn, and by the ministry of one who could hardly spell his own name. Surely it was the Lord's doing and is marvellous. The excellency of such power must be of God and cannot be of man. The regenerating spirit breathes not only on whom but likewise, when and where and as He listeth." Toplady received orders in the Church of England on June 6, 1762, and after some time was appointed to Broadhembury. His Psalms and Hymns of 1776 bears that he was then “B.A." and Vicar of Broadhembury. Shortly thereafter be is found in London as minister of the Chapel of the French Calvinists in Leicester Fields. He was a strong and partizan Calvinist, and not well-informed theologically outside of Calvinism. We willingly and with sense of relief leave unstirred the small thick dust of oblivion that has gathered on his controversial writings, especially his scurrilous language to John Wesley because of his Arminianism, as we do John Wesley's deplorable misunderstanding and misrepresentation of Calvinism. Throughout Toplady lacked the breadth of the divine Master's watchword "Forbid him not, for he that is not against us is for us" (St. Luke ix. 50). He was impulsive, rash-spoken, reckless in misjudgment; but a flame of genuine devoutness burned in the fragile lamp of his overtasked and wasted body. He died on August 11, 1778. The last edition of his works is in 6 vols., 8 vo., 1825. An accurate reproduction of most of his genuine hymns was one of the reprints of Daniel Sedgwick, 1860. His name occurs and recurs in contemporary memoirs and ecclesiastical histories, e.g., in Tyerman's Life of John Wesley. The reader will find in their places annotations on the several hymns of Toplady, and specially on his "Rock of Ages,” a song of grace that has given him a deeper and more inward place in millions of human hearts from generation to generation than almost any other hymnologist of our country, not excepting Charles Wesley. Besides the "Rock of Ages" must be named, for power, intensity, and higher afflatus and nicer workmanship, "Object of my first desire,” and "Deathless principle arise." It is to be regretted that the latter has not been more widely accepted. It is strong, firm, stirring, and masterful. Regarded critically, it must be stated that the affectionateness with which Toplady is named, and the glow and passion of his faith and life, and yearning after holiness, have led to an over-exaltation of him as a hymnwriter. Many of his hymns have been widely used, and especially in America, and in the Evangelical hymnbooks of the Church of England. Year by year, however, the number in use is becoming less. The reason is soon found. He is no poet or inspired singer. He climbs no heights. He sounds no depths. He has mere vanishing gleams of imaginative light. His greatness is the greatness of goodness. He is a fervent preacher, not a bard. [Rev. A. B. Grosart, D.D., LL.D.] Toplady's hymns and poetical pieces were published in his:— (1) Poems on Sacred Subjects wherein The Fundamental Doctrines of Christianity, with many other interesting Points, are occasionally introduced. . . Dublin: Printed by S. Powell, in Crane-lane, MDCCLIX.; (2) his Psalms & Hymns for Public and Private Worship, 1776; (3) in The Gospel Magazine, 1771-1776; and (4) in Hymns and Sacred Poems on a variety of Divine Subjects, &c. D. Sedgwick's reprint, 1860. His Works, with a Memoir by W. Row, were published in 6 volumes, in 1794. Walter How was also the editor of the 2nd and some later editions of the Psalms & Hymns. He was a most careless editor, and attributed several hymns by C. Wesley and others to Toplady. The following additional hymns in common use together with centos indicated in the sub-lines, are from:— i. His Poems on Sacred Subjects, 1759. 1. Can my heaven-born soul submit? All for Christ. 2. Come from on high, my King and God. Holiness desired. (1.) 0 might this worthless heart of mine. 3. Earnest of future bliss. The Witness of the Spirit. 4. From Thy supreme tribunal, Lord. Christ's Righteousness a Refuge. (1.) The spotless Saviour lived for me. 5. Great God, Whom heaven, and earth, and sea. For Peace. 6. I saw, and lo! a countless throng. Saints' Days. Revised form in the Gospel Magazine, 1774, p. 449. 7. Immovable our hope remains. Divine Faithfulness. 8. Jesus, God of love, attend. Divine Worship. Pt. ii. is "Prayer can mercy's door unlock." 9. Jesus, Thy power I fain would feel. Lent. 10. Lord, I feel a carnal mind. Mind of Christ desired. 11. My yielding heart dissolves as wax. On behalf of Arians, &c. (1.) 0 Jesus, manifest Thy grace. 12. Not to myself I owe. Praise for Conversion, (1.) Not to ourselves we owe. (2.) The Father's grace and love. 13. 0 that my heart was right with Thee. Dedication to God desired. 14. 0 Thou that hearest the prayer of faith. Christ the Propitiation. 15. 0 Thou Who didst Thy glory leave. Thanksgiving for Redemption. 16. 0 when wilt Thou my Saviour be. Trust in Jesus. (1.) Jesus, the sinner's Rest Thou art. 17. Redeemer, whither should I flee? Safety in the Cross. 18. Remember, Lord, that Jesus bled. Pardon. 19. Surely Christ thy griefs hath borne. Redemption. Revised text in Gospel Magazine, 1774, p. 548. (1.) Weary sinner, keep thine eyes. (2.) Weeping soul, no longer mourn. ii. From the Gospel Magazine. 20. Compared with Christ, in all besides. Christ All in All. Feb. 1772. 21. Eternal Hallelujahs Be to the Father given. Holy Trinity, Dec. 1774. 22. From whence this fear and unbelief. Reviving Faith, Feb. 1772. 23. How vast the benefits divine. Redemption. Dec. 1774. From this "Not for the works which we have done" is taken. 24. Whom have I in heaven but Thee? Christ All and in All, Feb. 1772. From this "If my Lord Himself reveal" is taken. 25. Jesus, immutably the same. Jesus, the True Vine. June, 1771. All these hymns, together with "O precious blood, 0 glorious death" (Death of Christ), are in D. Sedgwick's reprint of Toplady's Hymns, &c, 1860. We have met with several other hymns to which Toplady's name is appended, but for this we can find no authority whatever. -- Excerpts from John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907)

Lydia Baxter

1809 - 1874 Hymnal Number: d117 Author of "O depth of mercy can it [there] be" in The Garner Baxter, Lydia, an American Baptist, was b. at Petersburg, N. York, Sep. 2, 1800, married to Mr. Baxter, and d. in N. Y. June 22, 1874. In addition to her Gems by the Wayside, 1855, Mrs. Baxter contributed many hymns to collections for Sunday Schools, and Evangelistic Services. Of these, the following are the best known:— 1. Cast thy net again, my brother. Patient toil. Given in the Royal Diadem, N. Y., 1873. 2. Go, work in my vineyard. Duty. Also given in the Royal Diadem, 1873, and Mr. Sankey's S. & Solos, No. 4. 3. I'm kneeling, Lord, at mercy's gate. Lent. In Coronation Hymns, &c, N. Y., 1879. 4. I'm weary, I'm fainting, my day's work is done. Longing for rest. Royal Diadem. 1873. 5. In the fadeless spring-time. Heavenly Reunion. In the Royal Diadem, 1873, I. D. Sankey's S. S. & Solos, No. 256, and others. It was written for Mr. H. P. Main in 1872. 6. One by one we cross the river. Death. In Songs of Salvation, N. Y., 1870, I. D. Sankey's S. S. & Solos, No. 357, &c. It dates cir. 1866. 7. Take the name of Jesus with you. Name of Jesus. Written late in 1870, or early in 1871, for W. H. Doane, and pub. in Pure Gold, 1871. It is No. 148 of I. D. Sankey's S. S. & Solos. 8. The Master is coming. Invitation. In Songs of Salvation, 1870, No. 38. 9. There is a gate that stands ajar. Mercy. In New Hallowed Songs, and also the Gospel Songs of P. Bliss, 1874. It was written for S. J. Vail about 1872. It has attained to some popularity. It is given in Mr. Sankey's S. & Solos, No. 2. -John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907)

Mrs. Harry Coghill

1836 - 1907 Person Name: Anna Louisa Walker Coghill Hymnal Number: d141 Author of "Work, for the night is coming, work through the morning hours" in The Garner Coghill, Annie Louisa, née Walker, daughter of Robert Walker, was born at Kiddermore, Stafford­shire, in 1836, and married Harry Coghill in 1884. During a residence for some time in Canada several of her poetical pieces were printed in the Canadian newspapers. These were gathered together and published c. 1859 in her Leaves from the Backwoods. In addition to novels, plays for children, and magazine work, she edited the Autobiography and Letters of her cousin, Mrs. Oliphant, in 1898. Her popular hymn,"Work, for the night is coming," p. 317, ii., was written in Canada in 1854, and published in a Canadian newspaper, from which it passed, without any acknowledgement of the authorship, into Ira D. Sankey's Sacred Songs and Solos. Authorized text in her Oak and Maple, 1890, p. 17. --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology, New Supplement (1907) ====================== [See also: http://biographi.ca/en/bio.php?id_nbr=7126]

Ellen M. H. Gates

1835 - 1920 Hymnal Number: d53 Author of "Home of the soul" in The Garner Gates, Ellen, née Huntingdon, of Elizabeth, New Jersey, is the author of several popular pieces in the American Mission and Sunday School hymn-books. Of these the following have passed from the American books into Sankey's Sacred Songs and Solos:— 1. Come home, come home, you are weary at heart. Invitation. 2. I am now a child of God. Saved through Jesus. 3. I will sing you a song of that beautiful land. Concerning Heaven. 4. O the clanging bells of time. Yearning for Heaven. 5. Say, is your lamp burning, my brother. Watching and Waiting. Concerning her poem which is used as a hymn in America, "If you cannot on the ocean" (Duty), Duffield says her account of its origin is as follows:—"The lines were written upon my slate one snowy afternoon in the winter of 1860. I knew, as I know now, that the poem was only a simple little thing, but somehow 1 had a presentiment that it had wings, and would fly into sorrowful hearts, uplifting and strengthening them." (English Hymns, 1886, p. 257.) --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology, Appendix, Part II (1907) ====================== Gates, Ellen, p. 1565, i., now (1906) of New York city, was born at Torrington, Conn., and married to Isaac E. Gates. Her poems, &c, were published as Treasures of Kurium, 1895. Concerning Dr. March's hymn, "Hark! the voice of Jesus crying" (q.v.), and Mrs. Gates's "If you cannot on the ocean," some confusion has arisen, mainly, we think, from the fact that the opening line of Mrs. Gates's hymn, written in 1860, and the first line of Dr. March's second stanza are nearly the same, i.e., "If you cannot on the ocean," and "If you cannot cross the ocean." The incident which associates the late President Lincoln's name with this hymn is thus set forth by Mr. Philip Phillips in his Singing Pilgrim, 1866, p. 97:— "The words of this truly beautiful song ['If you cannot on the ocean'] were written by Mrs. Ellen H. Gates . . . When our lamented President Lincoln heard Mr. Phillips sing it at the Hall of Representatives in Washington, Feb. 29, 1865, he was overcome with emotion, and sent up the following written request [given in facsimile on p. 97] to Hon. Wm. H. Seward, Chairman, for its repetition:—' Near the end let us have "Your Mission" [the title of the hymn] repeated by Mr. Phillips. Don't say I called for it. A. Lincoln.' " It was through this incident that the hymn became known through America as " President Lincoln's favourite hymn." [Rev. James Mearns, M.A.] --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology, New Supplement (1907)

Thomas Shepherd

1665 - 1739 Hymnal Number: d75 Author of "Must Jesus bear the [his] cross alone" in The Garner Shepherd, Thomas, son of William Shepherd, sometime Vicar of Tilbrook, Bedfordshire, and subsequently a Nonconformist Minister at Oundle, and at Kettering, was born in 1665. Taking Holy Orders he held for some time preferment in Huntingdonshire, and in Buckinghamshire. Seceding from the Church of England, he became, in 1694, pastor of the Castle Hill Meeting House (Independent), Nottingham, of which Dr. Doddridge was subsequently pastor. In 1700 he removed to Bocking, near Braintree, Essex, where he began his work in a barn. A chapel was erected for his congregation in 1707. He died Jan. 29, 1739. His publications consisted chiefly of Sermons, His Penitential Cries were a continuance of those by John Mason, who wrote the first six and the version of Ps. 86, and were published with Mason's Songs of Praise in 1693. It must be noted that in D. Sedgwick's reprint of the Songs, and the Penitential Cries, in 1859, Mason's Cries are under the head of Songs, &c, pp. 49-61, and those under Penitential Cries, are all by Shepherd. Some of these Cries are still in common use including, "My God, my God, my Light, my Love " (Longing for God) ; and "When wilt Thou come unto me, Lord" (Communion with God desired). -- John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907)

Peter Williams

1723 - 1796 Hymnal Number: d32 Author of "Guide me, O thou great Jehovah" in The Garner Peter Williams (b. Llansadurnin, Carmarthanshire, Wales, 1722; d. Llandyfeilog, Wales, 1796) was converted to Christianity by the preaching of George Whitefield and was ordained in the Church of England in 1744. His evangelical convictions soon made him suspect, however, and he left the state church to join the Calvinist Methodists in 1746. He served as an itinerant preacher for many years and was a primary figure in the Welsh revival of the eighteenth century. After being expelled by the Methodists in 1791 on a charge of heresy, he ministered in his own chapel during the last years of his life. He published the first Welsh Bible commentary (1767-1770) and a Bible concordance (1773); he was also one of the annotators for John Canne's Welsh Bible (1790). In addition Williams published a Welsh hymnal, Rhai Hymnau ac Odlau Ysbrydol (1759), as well as Hymns on Various Subjects (1771). Bert Polman

Elizabeth Codner

1824 - 1919 Hymnal Number: d73 Author of "Even me, even me" in The Garner CODNER, Elizabeth (née Harris) was born in Dartmouth, Devon in 1823. Croydon, Surrey, 28 March 1919. She was interested in the mission field from an early age, and two of her early publications were entitled The Missionary Ship (1853) and The Missionary Farewell (1854) relating to the Patagonia Mission (later the South American Missionary Society). She married William Pennefather at the Mildmay Protestant Mission in London, and edited the mission’s monthly Woman’s Work in the Great Harvest Field. At age 17, she was editing a magazine for the Patagonia Mission, later the South American Missionary Society. She died in Croydon, Surrey on 28 March 1919. NN, Hymnary

Eliza H. Hamilton

Hymnal Number: d63 Author of "Take me as I am" in The Garner

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