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Yuji Abe

Author of "Jesus, My Friend, Is Great" in Baptist Hymnal 1991

Harriet E. Jones

1823 - 1915Author of "O, crucified Lord and Redeemer"Harriet E. Rice Jones, 1823-1915 Born: Ap­ril 18, 1823, Pom­pey Hol­low, Onon­da­ga Coun­ty, New York. Died: 1915, Bing­ham­ton, New York. Buried: Oran Com­mun­i­ty Church Cem­e­te­ry, Pom­pey, Onon­da­ga Coun­ty, New York. Daughter of El­e­a­zer Rice, Jones lived in Onon­da­ga Coun­ty, New York. Her girl­hood was spent on a farm, re­ceiv­ing what ed­u­ca­tion the count­ry schools and one term at high school could pro­vide. She was al­ways fond of read­ing, and was a great sing­er, with a clear ring­ing voice. On Ju­ly 7, 1844, she mar­ried a son of Rev. Ze­nas Jones; her hus­band died in 1879. Her song writ­ing ca­reer b­egan when her po­e­try came to the at­ten­tion of Dr. M. J. Mun­ger, who asked if she could write some Sun­day school hymns for him. She went on to write for Daniel Town­er, J. C. Ew­ing, the Fill­more bro­thers, and others. --hymntime.com/tch

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Josephine Pollard

1834 - 1892Author of "We come, we come, without delay"Pollard, Josephine, born in New York, circa 1840, is the author of (1) "I stood outside the gate" (Lent), (2) "Joy-bells ringing, Children singing" (Joy) in I. D. Sankey's Sacred Songs and Solos, 1878. --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology, Appendix, Part II (1907) ==================== Josephine Pollard-- Poet, author, and hymn-writer Josephine Pollard (1834-1892) wrote several one-syllable history books for children in the 1880's, as well as numerous juvenile biblical stories. Her titles are very popular with homeschoolers and parents as a way to promote reading. Among her one-syllable history books are The Life of George Washington, The History of the United States, and Our Naval Heroes. http://www.alibris.com/search/books/

Peter Abelard, 1079-1142

1079 - 1142Author (attributed to) of "O what the joy and the glory must be" in The HymnalAbelard, Peter, born at Pailais, in Brittany, 1079. Designed for the military profession, he followed those of philosophy and theology. His life was one of strange chances and changes, brought about mainly through his love for Heloise, the niece of one Fulbert, a Canon of the Cathedral of Paris, and by his rationalistic views. Although a priest, he married Heloise privately. He was condemned for heresy by the Council of Soissons, 1121, and again by that of Sens, 1140; died at St. Marcel, near Chalons-sur-Saoae, April 21, 1142. For a long time, although his poetry had been referred to both by himself and by Heloise, little of any moment was known except the Advent hymn, Mittit ad Virginem, (q.v.). In 1838 Greith published in his Spicihgium Vaticanum, pp. 123-131, six poems which had been discovered in the Vatican. Later on, ninety-seven hymns were found in the Royal Library at Brussels, and pub. in the complete edition of Abelard's works, by Cousin, Petri Abelardi Opp., Paris, 1849. In that work is one of his best-known hymns, Tuba Domini, Paule, maxima (q.v.). Trench in his Sacra Latina Poetry, 1864, gives his Ornarunt terram germina (one of a series of poems on the successive days' work of the Creation), from Du Meril's Poesies Popul. Lat. du Moyen Age, 1847, p. 444. -John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907)

American Baptist Publication Society

Publisher of "" in The Heart's Offering with Songs New and Old for The Lord's MemorialPhiladelphia

Anonymous

Author of "Savior, Like a Shepherd Lead Us" in Tabernacle Hymns Number FourIn some hymnals, the editors noted that a hymn's author is unknown to them, and so this artificial "person" entry is used to reflect that fact. Obviously, the hymns attributed to "Author Unknown" "Unknown" or "Anonymous" could have been written by many people over a span of many centuries.

Thomas MacKellar

1812 - 1899Author of "I give myself to God"Mackellar, Thomas, was born in New York, Aug. 12, 1812. At the age of 14 he entered the printing establishment of Harper Brothers. In 1833 he removed to Philadelphia and joined the type-foundry firm of Johnson & Smith, as proof reader. He subsequently became a foreman, and then a partner in that firm, which has been known from 1860 as Mackellar, Smiths, and Jordan, type-founders of Philadelphia. His publications include The American Printer, 1866, a prose work, and the following in verse:— (1) Droppings from the Heart, 1844; (2) Tam's Fortnight Ramble, 1847; (3) Lines for the Gentle and Loving, 1853; (4) Rhymes Atween Times, 1872. The last contains some of his hymns. (5) Hymns and a few Metrical Psalms, Phila. 1883 (71 hymns, 3 psalms), 2nd edition, 1887 (84 hymns, 3 psalms). Those of his hymns in common use include :— 1. At the door of mercy sighing. Lent. Published in his Rhymes Atween Times, 1872, as, "Long of restful peace forsaken," and again in Dr. Hitchcock's Hymns & Songs of Praise, 1874, as "At the door of mercy sighing." 2. Bear the burden of the present. Resignation. Written in 1852, and published in his Lines for the Gentle and Loving, 1853; and Lyra Sacra Americana, 1868. Part of this hymn, beginning "All unseen the Master walketh," was in common use in Great Britain. 3. Book of grace, and book of glory. Holy Scripture. Written in 1843. It was given in the Sunday School Union Collection, 1860, and his Hymns and a few M. Psalms, &c, 1883, and a few collections, including Allon's Children's Worship, 1878, &c. 4. Draw nigh to the Holy. Jesus, the soul’s Refuge. In Sumner's Songs of Zion, 1851, and the Lyra Sacra Americana, 1868, in 5 st. of 8 1ines. 5. Father, in my life's young morning. A Child's Prayer. Written in 1841. 6. In the vineyard of our Father. Work for God. Written in 1845. It was given in the Hymns for Church & Home, Philadelphia, I860, and other collections. 7. Jesus! when my soul is parting. Continued presence of Jesus desired. Written in 1848, and included in Lyra Sacra Americana, 1868, in 4 stanzas of 6 lines, and entitled "Jesus first and last." 8. There is a land immortal. Heaven. Mr. Mackellar says that this hymn was written "One evening as a fancy suddenly struck me of a religious nature, I laid aside the work in hand, and pursuing the new idea, I at once produced the hymn, ‘There is a land immortal,' and sent it to the editor [of Neale's Gazette], who referred to it as a religious poem from ‘Tam,' my assumed name, under which I had already acquired considerable notoriety. This was in 1845. It was widely copied, and afterwards inserted in a volume published by me." Duffield's English Hymns, &c, 1886, p. 551. Mr. Mackellar was an Elder of the Presbyterian Church. [Rev. F. M. Bird, M.A.] -- John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907) ====================== Mackellar, T., p. 708, ii. Additional hymns are:— (1) "I have no hiding-place" (Safety in Jesus), (2) “I will extol Thee every day" (Praise to God). These are dated 1880 and 1871 respectively in Stryker's Church Songs, N. Y., 1889. He died Dec. 29, 1899. --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology, Appendix, Part II (1907) ============ Mackellar, T., pp. 708, ii.; 1578, ii. He died Dec. 29, 1899. His hymn, “O the darkness, O the sorrow" (Redemption through Christ), was written in 1886, and added to the latest 1668 editions of his Hymns & Metrical Psalms. It is found in Summa Corda, 1898, and several other collections. His Hymns and Poems were collected and published in 1900. [Rev. L. F. Benson, D.D.] --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology, New Supplement (1907)

Dee Abernathy

Author of "Have faith in the One who can save"

William A. Ogden

1841 - 1897Author of "Now thanks be to God"William A. Ogden, 1841-1897 Born: Oc­to­ber 10, 1841, Frank­lin Coun­ty, Ohio. Died: Oc­to­ber 14, 1897, To­le­do, Ohio. When Ogden was six years old, his fam­i­ly moved to In­di­a­na. He began stu­dy­ing mu­sic in lo­cal sing­ing schools at age 8, and could read church mu­sic fair­ly well by age 10. A lit­tle la­ter, he could write a mel­o­dy by hear­ing it sung or played. When he was 18, he be­came a chor­ist­er in his home church. At the out­break of the Amer­i­can ci­vil war, Og­den en­list­ed in the 30th In­di­a­na Vol­un­teer In­fant­ry. Duri­ng the war he or­gan­ized a male choir, which be­came well known throug­hout the Ar­my of the Cum­ber­land. After the war, Og­den re­turned home and re­sumed his mu­sic­al stu­dies. Among his teach­ers were Lowell Mason, Thom­as Hast­ings, E. E. Baily, and B. F. Bak­er, pres­i­dent of the Bos­ton Mu­sic School. As his skills de­vel­oped, Ogden is­sued his first song book, The Sil­ver Song, in 1870; it be­came im­mense­ly pop­u­lar, sell­ing 500,000 co­pies. He went on to pub­lish num­er­ous other song books. In ad­di­tion to com­pos­ing, Og­den taught at ma­ny schools in the Unit­ed States and Ca­na­da. In 1887, he be­came sup­er­in­tend­ent of mu­sic in the pub­lic schools of To­le­do, Ohio. His works in­clude: New Sil­ver Songs for Sun­day School (Tole­do, Ohio: W. W. Whit­ney, 1872) Crown of Life (Tole­do, Ohio: W. W. Whit­ney, 1875) Notes of Vic­to­ry, with Ed­mund Lo­renz (Day­ton, Ohio: Unit­ed Breth­ren Publishing Com­pa­ny, 1885) The Way of Life (Tole­do, Ohio: W. W. Whit­ney, 1886) Gathered Jew­els (Tole­do, Ohio: W. W. Whit­ney, 1886) Lyrics-- Baptize Us Anew Everlasting Life He Is Able to De­li­ver Thee I’ve a Mess­age from the Lord On a Christ­mas Morn­ing Ring Out the Bells for Christ­mas Scattering Pre­cious Seed Seeking the Lost Where He Leads I’ll Fol­low Working, O Christ, with Thee Music-- All Things Are Rea­dy Bright For­ev­er­more, The Bring Them In Clark’s Grove Come to the Feast Eye of Faith, The Gathering Home Gracious Re­deem­er, The More Than Con­quer­ors Star in the East Steer To­ward the Light There Is Joy We’ll Work --hymntime.com/tch ============================== Ogden, W. A., is the author of “The blessed Saviour died for me, On the Cross" (Good Friday) and of the music thereto in I. D. Sankey's Sacred Songs and Solos. --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology, Appendix, Part II (1907) ============================== The DNAH Archives also has a profile of Ogden from the Portrait and biographical record of city of Toledo and Lucas and Wood counties, Ohio (1895) and a transcription of the Toledo News-Bee article of 16 October 1897 describing how the city paid tribute to Ogden at his death with resolutions, school closings, and funeral program.




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