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John Newton

1725 - 1807 Person Name: John Newton (1725-1807) Author of "May the Grace of Christ our Saviour" in The Christian Hymnary. Bks. 1-4 John Newton (b. London, England, 1725; d. London, 1807) was born into a Christian home, but his godly mother died when he was seven, and he joined his father at sea when he was eleven. His licentious and tumul­tuous sailing life included a flogging for attempted desertion from the Royal Navy and captivity by a slave trader in West Africa. After his escape he himself became the captain of a slave ship. Several factors contributed to Newton's conversion: a near-drowning in 1748, the piety of his friend Mary Catlett, (whom he married in 1750), and his reading of Thomas à Kempis' Imitation of Christ. In 1754 he gave up the slave trade and, in association with William Wilberforce, eventually became an ardent abolitionist. After becoming a tide-surveyor in Liverpool, England, Newton came under the influence of George Whitefield and John and Charles Wesley and began to study for the for the ministry. He was ordained in the Church of England and served in Olney (1764-1780) and St. Mary Woolnoth, London (1780-1807). His legacy to the Christian church includes his hymns as well as his collaboration with William Cowper (PHH 434) in publishing Olney Hymns (1779), to which Newton contributed 280 hymns, including “Amazing Grace.” Bert Polman ================== Newton, John, who was born in London, July 24, 1725, and died there Dec. 21, 1807, occupied an unique position among the founders of the Evangelical School, due as much to the romance of his young life and the striking history of his conversion, as to his force of character. His mother, a pious Dissenter, stored his childish mind with Scripture, but died when he was seven years old. At the age of eleven, after two years' schooling, during which he learned the rudiments of Latin, he went to sea with his father. His life at sea teems with wonderful escapes, vivid dreams, and sailor recklessness. He grew into an abandoned and godless sailor. The religious fits of his boyhood changed into settled infidelity, through the study of Shaftesbury and the instruction of one of his comrades. Disappointing repeatedly the plans of his father, he was flogged as a deserter from the navy, and for fifteen months lived, half-starved and ill-treated, in abject degradation under a slave-dealer in Africa. The one restraining influence of his life was his faithful love for his future wife, Mary Catlett, formed when he was seventeen, and she only in her fourteenth year. A chance reading of Thomas à Kempis sowed the seed of his conversion; which quickened under the awful contemplations of a night spent in steering a water-logged vessel in the face of apparent death (1748). He was then twenty-three. The six following years, during which he commanded a slave ship, matured his Christian belief. Nine years more, spent chiefly at Liverpool, in intercourse with Whitefield, Wesley, and Nonconformists, in the study of Hebrew and Greek, in exercises of devotion and occasional preaching among the Dissenters, elapsed before his ordination to the curacy of Olney, Bucks (1764). The Olney period was the most fruitful of his life. His zeal in pastoral visiting, preaching and prayer-meetings was unwearied. He formed his lifelong friendship with Cowper, and became the spiritual father of Scott the commentator. At Olney his best works—-Omicron's Letters (1774); Olney Hymns (1779); Cardiphonia, written from Olney, though published 1781—were composed. As rector of St. Mary Woolnoth, London, in the centre of the Evangelical movement (1780-1807) his zeal was as ardent as before. In 1805, when no longer able to read his text, his reply when pressed to discontinue preaching, was, "What, shall the old African blasphemer stop while he can speak!" The story of his sins and his conversion, published by himself, and the subject of lifelong allusion, was the base of his influence; but it would have been little but for the vigour of his mind (shown even in Africa by his reading Euclid drawing its figures on the sand), his warm heart, candour, tolerance, and piety. These qualities gained him the friendship of Hannah More, Cecil, Wilberforce, and others; and his renown as a guide in experimental religion made him the centre of a host of inquirers, with whom he maintained patient, loving, and generally judicious correspondence, of which a monument remains in the often beautiful letters of Cardiphonia. As a hymnwriter, Montgomery says that he was distanced by Cowper. But Lord Selborne's contrast of the "manliness" of Newton and the "tenderness" of Cowper is far juster. A comparison of the hymns of both in The Book of Praise will show no great inequality between them. Amid much that is bald, tame, and matter-of-fact, his rich acquaintance with Scripture, knowledge of the heart, directness and force, and a certain sailor imagination, tell strongly. The one splendid hymn of praise, "Glorious things of thee are spoken," in the Olney collection, is his. "One there is above all others" has a depth of realizing love, sustained excellence of expression, and ease of development. "How sweet the name of Jesus sounds" is in Scriptural richness superior, and in structure, cadence, and almost tenderness, equal to Cowper's "Oh! for a closer walk with God." The most characteristic hymns are those which depict in the language of intense humiliation his mourning for the abiding sins of his regenerate life, and the sense of the withdrawal of God's face, coincident with the never-failing conviction of acceptance in The Beloved. The feeling may be seen in the speeches, writings, and diaries of his whole life. [Rev. H. Leigh Bennett, M.A.] A large number of Newton's hymns have some personal history connected with them, or were associated with circumstances of importance. These are annotated under their respective first lines. Of the rest, the known history of which is confined to the fact that they appeared in the Olney Hymns, 1779, the following are in common use:— 1. Be still, my heart, these anxious cares. Conflict. 2. Begone, unbelief, my Saviour is near. Trust. 3. By the poor widow's oil and meal. Providence. 4. Chief Shepherd of Thy chosen sheep. On behalf of Ministers. 5. Darkness overspreads us here. Hope. 6. Does the Gospel-word proclaim. Rest in Christ. 7. Fix my heart and eyes on Thine. True Happiness. 8. From Egypt lately freed. The Pilgrim's Song. 9. He Who on earth as man was Known. Christ the Rock. 10. How blest are they to whom the Lord. Gospel Privileges. 11. How blest the righteous are. Death of the Righteous. 12. How lost was my [our] condition. Christ the Physician. 13. How tedious and tasteless the hours. Fellowship with Christ. 14. How welcome to the saints [soul] when pressed. Sunday. 15. Hungry, and faint, and poor. Before Sermon. 16. In mercy, not in wrath, rebuke. Pleading for Mercy. 17. In themselves, as weak as worms. Power of Prayer. 18. Incarnate God, the soul that knows. The Believer's Safety. 19. Jesus, Who bought us with His blood. The God of Israel. "Teach us, 0 Lord, aright to plead," is from this hymn. 20. Joy is a [the] fruit that will not grow. Joy. 21. Let hearts and tongues unite. Close of the Year. From this "Now, through another year," is taken. 22. Let us adore the grace that seeks. New Year. 23. Mary to her [the] Saviour's tomb. Easter. 24. Mercy, 0 Thou Son of David. Blind Bartimeus. 25. My harp untun'd and laid aside. Hoping for a Revival. From this "While I to grief my soul gave way" is taken. 26. Nay, I cannot let thee go. Prayer. Sometimes, "Lord, I cannot let Thee go." 27. Now may He Who from the dead. After Sermon. 28. 0 happy they who know the Lord, With whom He deigns to dwell. Gospel Privilege. 29. O Lord, how vile am I. Lent. 30. On man in His own Image made. Adam. 31. 0 speak that gracious word again. Peace through Pardon. 32. Our Lord, Who knows full well. The Importunate Widow. Sometimes altered to "Jesus, Who knows full well," and again, "The Lord, Who truly knows." 33. Physician of my sin-sick soul. Lent. 34. Pleasing spring again is here. Spring. 35. Poor, weak, and worthless, though I am. Jesus the Friend. 36. Prepare a thankful song. Praise to Jesus. 37. Refreshed by the bread and wine. Holy Communion. Sometimes given as "Refreshed by sacred bread and wine." 38. Rejoice, believer, in the Lord. Sometimes “Let us rejoice in Christ the Lord." Perseverance. 39. Salvation, what a glorious plan. Salvation. 40. Saviour, shine and cheer my soul. Trust in Jesus. The cento "Once I thought my mountain strong," is from this hymn. 41. Saviour, visit Thy plantation. Prayer for the Church. 42. See another year [week] is gone. Uncertainty of Life. 43. See the corn again in ear. Harvest. 44. Sinner, art thou still secure? Preparation for the Future. 45. Sinners, hear the [thy] Saviour's call. Invitation. 46. Sovereign grace has power alone. The two Malefactors. 47. Stop, poor sinner, stop and think. Caution and Alarm. 48. Sweeter sounds than music knows. Christmas. 49. Sweet was the time when first I felt. Joy in Believing. 50. Ten thousand talents once I owed. Forgiveness and Peace. 51. The grass and flowers, which clothe the field. Hay-time. 52. The peace which God alone reveals. Close of Service. 53. Thy promise, Lord, and Thy command. Before Sermon. 54. Time, by moments, steals away. The New Year. 55. To Thee our wants are known. Close of Divine Service. 56. We seek a rest beyond the skies. Heaven anticipated. 57. When any turn from Zion's way. Jesus only. 58. When Israel, by divine command. God, the Guide and Sustainer of Life. 59. With Israel's God who can compare? After Sermon. 60. Yes, since God Himself has said it. Confidence. 61. Zion, the city of our God. Journeying Zionward. -- John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907) ================= Newton, J., p. 803, i. Another hymn in common use from the Olney Hymns, 1779, is "Let me dwell on Golgotha" (Holy Communion). --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology, Appendix, Part II (1907) ----- John Newton was born in London, July 24, 1725. His mother died when he was seven years old. In his eleventh year he accompanied his father, a sea captain, on a voyage. For several years his life was one of dissipation and crime. He was disgraced while in the navy. Afterwards he engaged in the slave trade. Returning to England in 1748, the vessel was nearly wrecked in a storm. This peril forced solemn reflection upon him, and from that time he was a changed man. It was six years, however, before he relinquished the slave trade, which was not then regarded as an unlawful occupation. But in 1754, he gave up sea-faring life, and holding some favourable civil position, began also religious work. In 1764, in his thirty-ninth year, he entered upon a regular ministry as the Curate of Olney. In this position he had intimate intercourse with Cowper, and with him produced the "Olney Hymns." In 1779, Newton became Rector of S. Mary Woolnoth, in London, in which position he became more widely known. It was here he died, Dec. 21, 1807, His published works are quite numerous, consisting of sermons, letters, devotional aids, and hymns. He calls his hymns "The fruit and expression of his own experience." --Annotations of the Hymnal, Charles Hutchins, M.A. 1872 See also in: Hymn Writers of the Church =======================

J. Hart

1712 - 1768 Person Name: Joseph Hart Author of "Lamb of God, We Fall Before Thee" in The Cyber Hymnal Hart, Joseph, was born in London in 1712. His early life is involved in obscurity. His education was fairly good; and from the testimony of his brother-in-law, and successor in the ministry in Jewin Street, the Rev. John Hughes, "his civil calling was" for some time "that of a teacher of the learned languages." His early life, according to his own Experience which he prefaced to his Hymns, was a curious mixture of loose conduct, serious conviction of sin, and endeavours after amendment of life, and not until Whitsuntide, 1757, did he realize a permanent change, which was brought about mainly through his attending divine service at the Moravian Chapel, in Fetter Lane, London, and hearing a sermon on Rev. iii. 10. During the next two years many of his most earnest and impassioned hymns were written. These appeared as:— Hymns composed on Various Subjects, with the Author's Experience, London, 1759. During this year he became the Minister of the Independent Chapel, Jewin Street, London. In 1762 he added a Supplement to his Hymns; and in 1765 an Appendix. In modern editions of his Hymns these three are embodied in one volume as:— Hymns composed on Various Subjects: With the Author's Experience, The Supplement and Appendix. By the Rev. Joseph Hart, late Minister of the Gospel in Jewin Street, London. Allott & Co. [no date]. Hart died on May 24, 1768. At one time his hymns were widely used, especially by Calvinistic Nonconformists. Many of them are of merit, and are marked by great earnestness, and passionate love of the Redeemer. The best known are: “Come, Holy Spirit, come"; “Come, ye sinners, poor and wretched"; "This God is the God we adore"; and "Lord, look on all assembled here." Those which are more limited in their use include:— i. From his Hymns, &c, 1759. 1. Descend from heaven, celestial Dove. Whitsuntide. No. 6, in 6 stanzas of 6 lines. In Snepp's Songs of Grace & Glory., 1872, No. 374, st. iv., v. are omitted. It is in extensive use in America. 2. Great High Priest, we view Thee stooping. High Priesthood of Christ. No. 56, pt. ii., in 3 stanzas of 8 lines. In Snepp's Songs of Grace & Glory, 1872, No. 236; Hatfield's Church Hymn Book, N. Y., 1872, No. 435, &c. 8. How wondrous are the works of God. Redeeming Love. No. 21, in 9 stanzas of 4 lines. In the Scottish Evangelical Union Hymnal, 1878, st. i.-iv. are given as No. 11. 4. If ever it could come to pass. Final Perseverance. No. 58, in 3 stanzas of 6 lines. Repeated in Snepp's Songs of Grace & Glory, 1872, No. 729. 6. Jesus is our God and Saviour . Faith and Repentance. No. 54, in 7 stanzas of 8 lines. In Snepp's Songs of Grace & Glory, 1872, No. 146, st. iv. is omitted. In the London Hymn Book (enlarged), 1879, st. iii. and v. are given as "Nothing but Thy blood, 0 Jesus." 6. Jesus, while He dwelt below. Gethsemane. No. 75, in 23 stanzas of 6 lines. In Snepp's Songs of Grace & Glory, 1872, No. 230, sixteen stanzas are broken up into three parts: (i.) "Jesus, while He dwelt below"; (ii.) "Full of love to man's lost race"; (iii.) "There my God bore all my guilt." A cento is also given in Hatfield's Church Hymn Book, N. Y., 1872, No. 441, as "Many woes had Christ [He] endured." It is composed of st. viii., ix., xiii., xx., xxiii., slightly altered. In the Scottish Evangelical Union Hymnal, 1878, No. 34, 8 stanzas are given in two parts: pt. i. as, "Jesus, while He dwelt below"; pt. ii. "Eden from each flowery bed." 7. Lamb of God, we fall before Thee. Christ All in All. No. 17 in 4 stanzas of 8 lines. It is in various collections, and as altered in Kennedy , 1863, No. 1171, is much improved. 8. Let us all with grateful praises. Christmas. No. 14 in 7 stanzas of 8 lines. In Spurgeon's 0ur Own Hymn Book, 1866, it is reduced to 4 stanzas of 4 lines. 9. Lord, look on all assembled here. For a Public Fast. No. 96, in 8 stanzas of 4 lines. It is in several of the older hymnbooks. 10. Lord, we lie before Thy feet. Lent. No. 74, in 6 stanzas of 6 lines, and based on 2 Chron. xx. 20. In Spurgeon's 0ur Own Hymn Book, 1866, stanza i., iii., vi. are given as No. 585. 11. Mercy is welcome news indeed. God's Mercy in pardoning Sin. No. 51, in 6 stanzas of 4 lines, on St. Luke vii. 42. In Spurgeon, 1866, No. 544. 12. Much we talk of Jesu's blood. Passiontide. No. 41, in 4 st. of 8 lines, on Lam. i. 12. In Spurgeon, 1866, it is abridged to 4 stanzas of 4 lines. 13. Bow from the garden to the cross. Good Friday. No. 63, in 9 stanzas of 4 lines, and entitled, "The Crucifixion." In Spurgeon, 1866, No. 274, st. ii.-v., vi.-ix. are given as "See how the patient Jesus stands." 14. The Fountain of Christ Assist me to sing. The Fountain. No. 86, in 8 stanzas of 8 lines on Zech. xiii. 1. In Spurgeon, 1866, st. i., v., vii., viii., are given as No. 375. 15. The moon and stars shall lose their light. Advent. No. 48, in 4 stanzas of 4 lines, on St. Matt. xxiv. 35. In Spurgeon, 1866. 16. The sinner that truly believes. Saving Faith. No. 88, in 5 stanzas of 4 lines, and entitled, "Saving Faith" In Spurgeon, 1866, No. 533, st. ii. is omitted, and the opening line is altered to "The moment a sinner believes." ii. From his Supplement, 1762. 17. Behold what awful pomp. Advent. No. 52, in 8 stanzas of 4 lines. It is usually abridged as in the American Methodist Episcopal Hymns, 1849, No. 1107. 18. Christ is the Eternal Rock. The Offices of Christ. No. 27, in 6 stanzas of 8 lines. In Windle's Metrical Psalter & Hymnal, 1862, stanzas i., ii., v. are given as No. 53. 19. Christians, dismiss your fear. Easter. No. 33, in 4 stanzas of 8 lines into Dr. Alexander's Augustine Hymn Book, 1849, No. 79, in 7 stanzas of 4 lines. 20. Dismiss us with Thy blessing, Lord. Close of Service. No. 78, in 2 stanzas of 4 lines. In a few collections. 21. Gird thy loins up, Christian soldier. The Christian Armour . No. 29, in 5 stanzas of 8 lines, on Eph. vi. 11. Found in several of the older, and a few of the modern collections. 22. Glory to God on high, Our peace, &c. Holy Communion. No. 3, in 6 stanzas of 4 lines. In Hatfield's Church Hymn Book, 1872, No. 704, st. v., vi. are omitted. 23. Holy Ghost, inspire our praises. On behalf of Ministers. No. 77, in 5 stanzas of 8 lines. In the Scottish Evangelical Union Hymnal, 1878, No. 412, st. iii.-v. are given as, "Happy soul that hears and follows." 24. Jesus once for sinners slain. Holy Communion. No. 18, in 6 stanzas of 4 lines. In American use. 25. Lord, help us on Thy word to feed. Close of Service. No. 80, in 2 stanzas of 4 lines. In several modern hymnbooks. 26. O for a glance of heavenly day. Lent. No. 64, in 5 stanzas of 4 lines. In Hatfield's Church Hymn Book, 1872, and other American collections it is usually repeated in full. In Bickersteth's Christian Psalmody, 1833, it was given as, "Lord, shed a beam of heavenly day," and this is repeated in modern hymnbooks. 27. Once more before we part. Close of Service. No. 79, in 2 stanzas of 4 lines. Popular in Great Britain and America. 28. Once more we come before our God. Before a Sermon. No. 21, in 6 stanzas of 4 lines, into Hatfield, 1872, No. 111, and others. 29. Sons of God by bless'd adoption. Burial. No. 45, in 3 stanzas of 8 lines, into Snepp's Songs of Grace & Glory, 1872, No. 981, as "Sons of God by blest adoption." 30. Suffering Saviour, Lamb of God . Holy Communion. No. 14, in 8 stanzas of 4 lines. In W. F. Stevenson's Hymns for Church & Home, 1873, st. iii., vii. are omitted. 31. That doleful night before His death. Holy Communion. No. 17, in 2 stanzas of 8 lines. In the Scottish Evangelical Union Hymnal, 1878, st. i. 11. 4-8, and st. ii., are given as, "To keep Thy Feast, Lord, we are met." iii. From his Appendix, 1765. 32. Christians, in your several stations. Christian Duty. No. 7, in 5 stanzas of 6 lines. It is slightly altered in Snepp's Songs of Grace & Glory, 1872, No. 742, and dated 1759 in error. 33. Prayer was [is] appointed to convey. Prayer. No. 12 in 6 stanzas of 4 lines into Snepp's Songs of Grace & Glory, 1872, No. 542, with alterations and the omission of st. ii., v. In some American collections it begins, "Prayer is to God, the soul's sure way." --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907) ======================= Hart, Joseph, p. 492, ii. Other hymns in common use are— 1. The blest memorials of Thy grief (1762). Holy Communion. 2. To comprehend the great Three-One (1759). Holy Trinity. 3. Vain man, thy fond pursuits forbear (1759). Death. 4. When the blest day of Pentecost (1759). Whitsuntide. --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology, Appendix, Part II (1907)

Catherine Winkworth

1827 - 1878 Person Name: Catherine Winkworth, 1827-1878 Translator of "Strive Aright When God Doth Call" in The Christian Hymnary. Bks. 1-4 Catherine Winkworth (b. Holborn, London, England, 1827; d. Monnetier, Savoy, France, 1878) is well known for her English translations of German hymns; her translations were polished and yet remained close to the original. Educated initially by her mother, she lived with relatives in Dresden, Germany, in 1845, where she acquired her knowledge of German and interest in German hymnody. After residing near Manchester until 1862, she moved to Clifton, near Bristol. A pioneer in promoting women's rights, Winkworth put much of her energy into the encouragement of higher education for women. She translated a large number of German hymn texts from hymnals owned by a friend, Baron Bunsen. Though often altered, these translations continue to be used in many modern hymnals. Her work was published in two series of Lyra Germanica (1855, 1858) and in The Chorale Book for England (1863), which included the appropriate German tune with each text as provided by Sterndale Bennett and Otto Goldschmidt. Winkworth also translated biographies of German Christians who promoted ministries to the poor and sick and compiled a handbook of biographies of German hymn authors, Christian Singers of Germany (1869). Bert Polman ======================== Winkworth, Catherine, daughter of Henry Winkworth, of Alderley Edge, Cheshire, was born in London, Sep. 13, 1829. Most of her early life was spent in the neighbourhood of Manchester. Subsequently she removed with the family to Clifton, near Bristol. She died suddenly of heart disease, at Monnetier, in Savoy, in July, 1878. Miss Winkworth published:— Translations from the German of the Life of Pastor Fliedner, the Founder of the Sisterhood of Protestant Deaconesses at Kaiserworth, 1861; and of the Life of Amelia Sieveking, 1863. Her sympathy with practical efforts for the benefit of women, and with a pure devotional life, as seen in these translations, received from her the most practical illustration possible in the deep and active interest which she took in educational work in connection with the Clifton Association for the Higher Education of Women, and kindred societies there and elsewhere. Our interest, however, is mainly centred in her hymnological work as embodied in her:— (1) Lyra Germanica, 1st Ser., 1855. (2) Lyra Germanica, 2nd Ser., 1858. (3) The Chorale Book for England (containing translations from the German, together with music), 1863; and (4) her charming biographical work, the Christian Singers of Germany, 1869. In a sympathetic article on Miss Winkworth in the Inquirer of July 20, 1878, Dr. Martineau says:— "The translations contained in these volumes are invariably faithful, and for the most part both terse and delicate; and an admirable art is applied to the management of complex and difficult versification. They have not quite the fire of John Wesley's versions of Moravian hymns, or the wonderful fusion and reproduction of thought which may be found in Coleridge. But if less flowing they are more conscientious than either, and attain a result as poetical as severe exactitude admits, being only a little short of ‘native music'" Dr. Percival, then Principal of Clifton College, also wrote concerning her (in the Bristol Times and Mirror), in July, 1878:— "She was a person of remarkable intellectual and social gifts, and very unusual attainments; but what specially distinguished her was her combination of rare ability and great knowledge with a certain tender and sympathetic refinement which constitutes the special charm of the true womanly character." Dr. Martineau (as above) says her religious life afforded "a happy example of the piety which the Church of England discipline may implant.....The fast hold she retained of her discipleship of Christ was no example of ‘feminine simplicity,' carrying on the childish mind into maturer years, but the clear allegiance of a firm mind, familiar with the pretensions of non-Christian schools, well able to test them, and undiverted by them from her first love." Miss Winkworth, although not the earliest of modern translators from the German into English, is certainly the foremost in rank and popularity. Her translations are the most widely used of any from that language, and have had more to do with the modern revival of the English use of German hymns than the versions of any other writer. -- John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907) ============================ See also in: Hymn Writers of the Church

John J. Overholt

1918 - 2000 Author of "O Our God, to Thee We Render" in The Christian Hymnary. Bks. 1-4 John J. Overholt was born to an Amish family of limited means in the state of Ohio in 1918. As a child he was soon introduced to his father's personal collection of gospel songs and hymns, which was to have a marked influence on his later life. With his twin brother Joe, he early was exposed to the Amish-Mennonite tradition of hymn singing and praising worship. An early career in Christian service led to a two-year period of relief work in the country of Poland following World War II. During that interim he began to gather many European songs and hymns as a personal hobby, not realizing that these selections would become invaluable to The Christian Hymnary which was begun in 1960 and completed twelve years later in 1972, with a compilation of 1000 songs, hymns and chorales. (The largest Menn. Hymnal) A second hymnal was begun simultaneously in the German language entitled Erweckungs Lieder Nr.1 which was brought to completion in 1986. This hymnal has a total of 200 selections with a small addendum of English hymns. Mr. Overholt married in 1965 to an accomplished soprano Vera Marie Sommers, who was not to be outdone by her husband's creativity, and compiled a hymnal of 156 selections entitled Be Glad and Sing, directed to children and youth and first printed in 1986. During this later career of hymn publishing, Mr. Overholt also found time for Gospel team work thruout Europe. At this writing he is preparing for a 5th consecutive tour which he arranges and guides. The countries visited will be Belgium, Switzerland, France, Germany, Poland, USSR and Romania. Mr. Overholt was called to the Christian ministry in 1957 and resides at Sarasota, Florida where he is co-minister of a Beachy Amish-Mennonite Church. Five children were born to this family and all enjoy worship in song. --Letter from Hannah Joanna Overholt to Mary Louise VanDyke, 10 October 1990, DNAH Archives. Photo enclosed.

Johannes Thommen

1711 - 1783 Person Name: Johann Thommen Composer of "RINGE RECHT" in The Cyber Hymnal

Johann Joseph Winckler

1670 - 1722 Person Name: Johann Joseph Winckler (1670-1722) Author of "Strive Aright When God Doth Call" in The Christian Hymnary. Bks. 1-4 Winckler, John Joseph, a German Pietist, was born at Luckau, in Saxony, December 23, 1670. He was at first a pastor at Magdeburg, then a chaplain in the Protestant army, accompanying the troops to Holland and Italy, and at length returned to Magdeburg and became chief minister of the cathedral. He was no less eminent for his mental culture than for his piety. He was a preacher and writer who had the courage of his convictions, and this quality is notably manifest in the hymn by him found in this collection. He died August 11, 1722. Shall I, for fear of feeble man 225 Hymn Writers of the Church Nutter ================================================================== Winckler, Johann Joseph, son of Gottfried Winckler, town clerk of Lucka, Sachse-Altenburg, was born at Lucka, Dec. 23, 1670. He became a student of Theology at the University of Leipzig, during the time when A. H. Francke and J. C. Schade were holding their Bible readings, and his sympathies henceforth were with the Pietistic movement. In 1692 he was appointed preacher to the St. George's Hospital at Magdeburg, and afternoon preacher at St. Peter's Church there. He became chaplain to the Prince Christian Ludwig regiment in 1695, and went with it to Holland and Italy. After the Peace of Ryswijk (Oct. 30, 1697) he made a tour in Holland and England. Returning to Magdeburg, he was appointed, in 1698, diaconus of the Cathedral, and in 1703 also inspector of the so-called Holzkreis. Finally, in 1714, he became chief preacher at the Cathedral, and in 1716, also Consistorialrath. He died at Magdeburg, Aug. 11, 1722 (Wetzel, iii. 437; Grischow-Kirchner Nachricht to Freylinghausen, p. 53; Koch, iv. 383; Blätter fur Hymnologie, 1888, p. 170, &c). Winckler was a man who had the courage of his opinions, and his hymn No. iv. below is a picture of the stand he was willing to make when conscience bade him. Not that he was fond of controversy, but rather the reverse. Twice however he raised considerable feeling against himself in Magdeburg, first by the position he took up against theatre going, and afterwards by his well-meant attempts to bring about a closer union between the Lutheran and Reformed churches in Prussia. But the opposition he encountered he bore patiently, and in the spirit of his hymn No. i. below. His hymns, some 27 in all appeared mostly in the Appendix to the 2nd edition. 1703 of H. G. Neuss’s Heb-Opfer, in Porst’s Gesang-Buch, Berlin, 1708,and in Freylinghausens Neues geistreiches Gesang-Buch, 1714. They rank among the better productions of the earlier Pietistic writers, and are distinguished by firm faith, earnestness, and picturesqueness; but are somewhat lengthy and frequently in unusual metres. Those of Winckler's hymns which have passed into English are:— i. Meine Seele senket sich. Resignation. First published in the 1703 edition of Neuss's Heb-Opfer, p. 248, in 6 stanzas of 6 lines, entitled "Ps. 62 v. 1. My soul is still towards God." Repeated in Freylinghause, 1714, No. 511, and in the Unverfälschter Liedersegen, 1851, No. 714. It is a fine hymn on patient waiting upon God's will. Translated as:— Yea, my spirit fain would sink. In full, by Miss Winkworth in her Lyra Germanica, 1st Ser., 1855, p. i98. In her Chorale Book for England, 1863, No. 138, it is greatly altered, beginning "In Thy heart and hands, my God"; and this form is No. 419 in the Ohio Lutheran Hymnal, 1880. Another translation is: "Wearily my spirit sinketh," by Mrs. Sevan, 1858, p. 65. ii. 0 süsser Stand, o selig Leben . Christian Simplicity. In Porst's Gesang-Buch, 1708, p. 519 (1711, No. 642), in 8 stanzas of 8 lines, repeated inFreylinghausen, 1714, No. 322, and in the Unverfälschter Liedersegen, 1851, No. 331. The translations are:— 1. 0 sweet condition, happy Living. This, omitting st. iii., is No. 658 in pt. i. of the Moravian Hymn Book, 1754. 2. 0 blest condition, happy living. This is a translation of st. i., ii., vi., viii., based on the 1754 version, as No. 441 in theMoravian Hymn Book, 1789 (1886, No. 584). iii. Binge recht, wenn Gottes Gnade. Christian Warfare. A thoughtful and powerful hymn, included as No. 359 in Unverfälschter Liedersegen , 1851, No. 336. Wetzel, iii. 437, says it was written as a hymn on the three favourite Scripture passages of Ursula Maria Zorn, of Berlin, and was first published at the end of her funeral sermon by Johann Lysius, pastor of St. George's Church, Berlin. Thus stanzas i.-v. are founded on St. Luke xiii. 24; vi.-xv. on Philipp. ii. 12; and xvi.-xxiii. on Gen. xix. 15-22. The translations in common use are: 1. Strive, when thou art call'd of God. This is a good translation of st. i., iii.-vii., xii., xiii., xv., xvi. by Miss Winkworth, in her Lyra Germanica, 1st Ser., 1855, p. 46. Repeated, abridged, in Kennedy, 1863; the Harrow School Hymn Book, 1866, and Rugby School Hymn Book, 1876. 2. Strive aright when God doth call thee. This is a translaton of st. i., iii., iv., xii., xiii., xv., xvi. by Miss Winkworth, founded on her Lyra Germanica version, as No. 128 in her Chorale Book for England, 1863. Repeated in the Marlborough College Hymn Book, 1869. 3. Thou must wrestle, when God's mercy. This is a tr. of st. i., ii., x., xxii., signed E. T. L., as No. 230, in Dr. Pagenstecher's Collection, 1864. Another translation is: “Wrestle on! for God is pleading," by Miss Burlingham in the British Herald, Sept., 1865, p. 137. iv. Sollt ich aus Furcht vor Menschenkindern. Adherence to Christ. A hymn on Constancy, and against cowardice and time-serving. In Porst's Gesang-Buch, 1708, p. 1133 (1711, No. 701), in 17 stanzas of 4 lines. Repeated in Freylinghausen, 1714, No. 541 (entitled "For a Preacher"), in the Unverfälschter Liedersegen 1851, No. 658, &c. The translation in common use is:— Shall I for fear of feeble man. This is a vigorous translation in 10 stanzas (representing st. i.-iii., xii.-xv., xvii.; st. iv. being freely from vi., vii., and st. v. from viii., xi.), by J. Wesley in the Hymns & Sacred Poems, 1739 (Poetical Works, 1868-72, vol. i. p. 177). Included in full in the Moravian Hymn Book, 1754 (1849, No. 875 abridged). In the Wesleyan Hymn Book, 1780, stanzas i.—vii. were included as No. 270; stanzas viii.-x. being added in the edition of 1800 (1875, No. 279). The full form is in the Methodist New Congrational Hymn Book., 1863, and in Mercer's Church Psalter & Hymn Book 91857, and abridged in Mercer's Oxford edition, 1864; Spurgeon's Our Own Hymn Book,1866, and others. It is also found in the following forms:— (1) Awed by a mortal's frown, shall I (Wesley's st. ii.). In W. Carus Wilson's Gen. Psalter 1842. (2) Saviour of men, Thy searching eye (Wesley's at. vi.). In J. A. Latrobe's Psalms & Hymns, 1841, and various American collections. (3) Our Lives, our Blood, we here present (Wesley's st. ix. alt.). In M. Madan's Psalms & Hymns, 1760. [Rev. James Mearns, M.A.] -- John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907) =========================== See also in: Hymn Writers of the Church

Madeleine Forell Marshall

b. 1946 Translator of "Simple Innocence, Most Holy" in Moravian Book of Worship

J. D. Herrnschmidt

1675 - 1723 Person Name: Prof. J. D. Herrnschmidt, 1675-1723 Author of "Storms of trouble may assail us" in Hymnal and Liturgies of the Moravian Church Herrnschmidt, Johann Daniel, was born April 11, 1675, at Bopfingen, in Württemberg, where his father, G. A. Herrnschmidt, was from 1673-1702 diaconus, and 1702-1714 Town preacher. He entered the University of Altdorf in 1696 (M.A. 1698), and in the autumn of 1698 went to Halle. In the spring of 1702 he became assistant to his father, and in July, 1702, Heifer at the Town church. In 1712 he became superintendent, court preacher and consistorialrath at Idstein, and in the same year graduated D.D. at Halle. He was finally, in 1715, appointed Professor of Theology at Halle, and in 1716 also sub-director of the Orphanage and the Padagogium there. He died at Halle, Feb. 5, 1723 (Koch, iv. 349-354, 569, &c). He was one of the best hymnwriters of the older Pietistic school. His hymns are Scriptural, and mirror his inner life, but do not possess much poetic force. They were almost all written during his first residence at Halle, 1698-1702, and appeared mostly in Freylinghausen's Geistreiches Gesang Buch1704. Three have passed into English, viz.:— i. Gott wills machen, class die Sachen. Trust in God. 1704, No. 417, in 17 stanzas of 6 lines, repeated as No. 706 in the Unvfälschter Liedersegen, 1851. It is founded on the Gospel for the fourth Sunday after Epiphany (St. Matt. viii. 23-27); and is full of clear cut, almost proverbial sayings. Translated as: (1) "God will make it, canst thou take it," in the Supplement to German Psalmody, ed. 1765, p. 63. (2) "Storms and winds may blow and batter," as No. 455 in the Moravian Hymn Book 1789. In the 1801 and later eds. (1886, No. 626), it begins, "Storms of trouble may assail us." (3) “God so guides us, what betides us," by N. L. Frothingham, 1870, p. 251. The two remaining hymns (ii., iii.) are annotated under Various. [Rev. James Mearns, M.A.] --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907)

August Gottlieb Spangenberg

1704 - 1792 Person Name: Augustus G. Spangenberg, 1704-1792 Author of "When Simplicity We Cherish" in Hymnal and Liturgies of the Moravian Church Spangenberg, August Gottlieb, son of Georg Spangenberg, Lutheran pastor at Klettenberg near Nordhausen, was born at Klettenberg, July 15, 1704. He entered the University of Jena in 1722, as a student of law, but soon abandoned law for the study of theology. He lived in the house of Professor Buddeus, graduated M.A. in 1726, and for some time lectured there. In Sept. 1732 he went to Halle as adjunct of the Theological faculty and superintendent of the Orphanage schools. Here he associated himself with the Separatists, and by an edict from Berlin was deprived of his offices, and, on April 8, 1733, was expelled from Halle. He at once proceeded to Herrnhut, and was received into the Moravian Community, with which he had become acquainted as early as 1727. In 1735 he accompanied the Moravian colony which settled in Georgia, and served also in Pennsylvania and in the Island of St. Thomas. He returned to Germany in 1739, and was for some time at Marienborn in Hesse. In Sept. 1741 he was present at an important Moravian Conference in London, and was there appointed a member of the Unity's Direction, and also director of their financial affairs. While in England he founded, in 1742, the first English Moravian settlement, at Smith House in Yorkshire. He was then, on June 15, 1744, consecrated at Herrenhaag as Moravian Bishop for North America, and from that time till 1762 was for the most part in America, working principally in Pennsylvania, and among the Indians, and paying two visits to Europe. In 1762 he became the senior member of the Unity's Direction as successor to Zinzendorf, and thereafter resided for the most part either at Herrnhut or at Barby. The last years of his life were spent at Berthelsdorf near Herrnhut, where he resigned his offices in Sept. 1791, and died Sept. 18, 1792. (Koch, v. 337; G. F. Otto's Lexicon Oberlausizischer Schriftsteller, iii. 306; Herzog's Real-Encyklopädie, xiv., 460, &c.) Spangenberg was an earnest and able man, was much beloved and respected, and was entrusted by the Brethren with many important missions, being e.g. the principal agent in the negotiations between the Moravians and the British Government. He did good service both in consolidating the Moravian organization and by untiring labours in America. His Autobiography appeared in 1784. He also wrote a life of Zinzendorf, in 8 vols., published at Barby 1772-75. His other chief work is his Idea fidei fratrum, &c, Barby, 1779 (English tr. as An Exposition of Christian Doctrine, as taught in the Protestant Church of the United Brethren, &c, London, 1784), which is accepted as an authorised exposition of the Moravian theology. He only wrote a few hymns, which are of fervent but rational piety, but do not entitle him to high rank as a, hymnwriter. They were mostly written before 1746. Ten of them are included in the Brüder Gesang-Buch of 1778. Of these ten hymns the following may be noted here:— i. Der König runt, und schauet doch. Christian Works. First published as No. 1004 in Appendix, i., 1737, to the Herrnhut Gesang-Buch 1735, and is in 8 stanzas of 10 lines. Tr. as:— High on His everlasting Throne. This is a spirited but free translation by J. Wesley, in Hymns & Sacred Poems, 1742. ii. Die Kirche Christi ist hin und her. Unity of the Christian Church. The hymn has been translated as:— The Church of Christ that He hath hallow'd here. This is a good translation of st. i.-iii. of the 1778 by Miss Winkworth, in her Lyra Germanica, 2nd Ser., 1858, p. 58. iii. Heilige Einfalt, Gnadenwunder. Christian Simplicity. This is an excellent picture of his own Christian character. According to Bunsen, 1833, p. 904, it was written as a birthday hymn for his sister. The date which Bunsen gives for its composition (1744) is probably a misprint for 1741. Translated as:— 1. When simplicity we cherish. This is given in 14 stanzas as No. 387 in pt. ii., 1746, of the Moravian Hymn Book. In the 1789 and later eds. (1849, No. 603) it is reduced to 6 stanzas, and is entirely rewritten, save the opening line. [Rev. James Mearns, M.A.] --Excerpts from John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907)

Frederick W. Foster

1760 - 1835 Person Name: Frederick William Foster, 1760-1835 Author of "On Thy Ransomed Congregation" in Hymnal and Liturgies of the Moravian Church Foster, Frederick William, second son. of William Foster, was born at Bradford, Aug. 1, 1760, and educated at Fulneck, near Leeds, and at Barby in Prussian Saxony. Entering the Moravian Ministry he held several appointments until 1818, when he was consecrated a Bishop of the Moravian Church. He died at Ockbrook, near Derby, April 12, 1835. He compiled the Moravian Hymn Book of 1801, the Supplement of 1808, and the revised edition of 1826. His translations from the German, and his original hymns appeared in that collection. Two of his original hymns are in the Irish Church Hymnal, 1873; (1) "Lord, Who didst sanctify" 1808 (Holiness desired); and (2) "With thanks before the Lord appear," 1826 (Praise of the Saviour). [George Arthur Crawford, M. A.] --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology, Appendix, Part II (1907)

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