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Angels We Have Heard on High

Meter: 7.7.7.7 with refain Appears in 228 hymnals Refrain First Line: Gloria Lyrics: 1 Angels we have heard on high ... see Christ whose birth the angels sing; come, adore on bended ... laid, whom the choirs of angels praise; Mary, Joseph, lend your ... Topics: Jesus Christ; Glory; Christian Year Epiphany; Christian Year Christmas; Christ's Gracious Life Birth and Baptism; Christian Year Epiphany; Christian Year Christmas; Christ's Gracious Life Birth and Baptism; Responses, Antiphonal Scripture: Luke 2:6-20 Used With Tune: GLORIA Text Sources: Traditional French carol; trans. Crown of Jesus,1852, alt.
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Angels from the Realms of Glory

Author: James Montgomery Meter: 8.7.8.7.8.7 Appears in 699 hymnals Refrain First Line: Come and worship, come and worship Lyrics: 1 Angels from the realms of glory, ... Topics: Opening Hymns; Jesus Christ; Christian Year Epiphany; Christian Year Christmas; Christ's Gracious Life Birth and Baptism; Christian Year Epiphany; Christian Year Christmas; Christ's Gracious Life Birth and Baptism; Responses, Antiphonal Scripture: Malachi 3:1 Used With Tune: REGENT SQUARE
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There are angels hovering round

Appears in 180 hymnals Used With Tune: THERE ARE ANGELS HOVERING ROUND!

Tunes

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TERRA BEATA

Composer: Anonymous; Franklin L. Sheppard Appears in 154 hymnals Tune Sources: Traditional English melody; Alleluia , 1915 Tune Key: E Flat Major Incipit: 12353 21234 65326 Used With Text: "Fear Not!" the Angel Said
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GLORIA

Meter: 7.7.7.7 with refrain Appears in 152 hymnals Tune Sources: French carol melody Tune Key: F Major Incipit: 33355 43323 53213 Used With Text: Angels We Have Heard on High
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MENDELSSOHN

Composer: Felix Mendelssohn, 1809-1840 Appears in 331 hymnals Tune Sources: Taken from Felix Mendelssohn's Festgesang an die Kunstler , Op. 68. ... 1840 Tune Key: F Major or modal Incipit: 51171 33255 54323 Used With Text: Hark! The Herald Angels Sing

Instances

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Published text-tune combinations (hymns) from specific hymnals
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Joy Among the Angels

Author: D. O. T. Hymnal: Timeless Truths #617 Meter: 10.5.10.5.6.5.8.10 First Line: There is joy, glad joy among the angels Lyrics: ... joy, glad joy among the angels, Joy in heav’n above ... love. Refrain: Joy among the angels, Joy in heav’n above ... joy, more joy among the angels, When the lost is found ... Scripture: Luke 15:10 Tune Title: [There is joy, glad joy among the angels]
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Angel of Easter

Author: Lizzie DeArmond Hymnal: The Voice of Praise #218 (1904) First Line: Angel of Easter, speed down thro' the night Refrain First Line: Come, bright Easter angel Lyrics: 1 Angel of Easter, speed down thro' ... illume. Chorus: Come, bright Easter angel, on wings of love; Tell ... glad Easter time. [Chorus] 3 Angel of Easter, so strong and ... Tune Title: [Angel of Easter, speed down thro' the night]
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The Angel Choir

Author: Daniel S. Warner Hymnal: Timeless Truths #296 Meter: 8.6.8.6 D First Line: I seem to hear an angel choir Refrain First Line: Hark! o’er the vale sweet melodies Lyrics: ... I seem to hear an angel choir Down from their shining ... Topics: Meditation Scripture: Revelation 5:11-12 Tune Title: [I seem to hear an angel choir]

People

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Authors, composers, editors, etc.

Ira B. Wilson

1880 - 1950 Person Name: Ira Bishop Wilson Composer of "[Angels chant the heav'nly song]" in The Cyber Hymnal Ira Bishop Wilson, 1880-1950 Born: Sep­tem­ber 6, 1880, Bed­ford, Io­wa. Died: Ap­ril 3, 1950, Los An­ge­les, Cal­i­for­nia. Buried: For­est Lawn Me­mor­i­al Park, Glen­dale, Cal­i­for­nia. Pseudonym: Fred B. Hol­ton. Wilson’s sis­ter taught him to play the vi­o­lin and or­gan while still at home. Around 1902, Ira be­gan stu­dies at the Moo­dy Bi­ble In­sti­tute in Chi­ca­go, Il­li­nois. In 1905, he went to work for the Lorenz Pub­lish­ing Com­pa­ny in Day­ton, Ohio. His com­po­si­tions ap­peared in The Choir Lead­er and The Choir Her­ald; he al­so served as ed­it­or in chief of The Vol­un­teer Choir. His works in­clude: The King’s Mes­sage, with Ed­mund Lo­renz (New York: Lo­renz Pub­lish­ing Com­pa­ny, 1910) The Be­gin­ners’ Choir, with Ed­mund Lor­enz (Day­ton, Ohio: Lor­enz Pub­lish­ing Com­pa­ny, 1911) Praise Ye, a Col­lect­ion of Sac­red Songs, with Ed­mund Lor­enz (New York: Lor­enz Pub­lish­ing Com­pa­ny, 1913) His Worthy Praise, with Ed­mund Lor­enz (Day­ton, Ohio: Lor­enz Pub­lish­ing Com­pa­ny, 1915) Sources-- Hall, pp. 413-5 Lyrics-- Go For­ward to Con­quer Look Above Make Me a Bless­ing © 1924 My Sav­ior’s Voice This Won­der­ful Christ Is Mine Trustingly Fol­low Music-- Across the Temp­led Hills Angels’ Chor­us, The Christ Is Born Christ the Lord Is Born Christmas Lull­a­by Conchita Exalt the King Give Praise God Is Good­ness, God Is Love God Is So Good He Arose To­day His Love Is Al­ways True Jesus Wants Us to Help Joy to the World Loving Je­sus Christ Marching For­ward May God De­pend on You? Night of Nights O Star of Match­less Splen­dor On Cal­va­ry’s Cross One Day Out in the High­ways and By­ways of Life Rejoice! Re­joice! Ring, Sweet Bells Song of the Morn­ing, The Stars of De­cem­ber Walking with Je­sus Was There Ev­er a Friend So True? We Come To­day What Do the Flow­ers Say? Who Will Our Pi­lot Be? Win One --hymntime.com/tch

Thomas Aquinas

1225 - 1274 Person Name: St. Thomas Aquinas, 1227-1274 Author (Latin) of "Bread of Angels" in Glory and Praise (3rd. ed.) Thomas of Aquino, confessor and doctor, commonly called The Angelical Doctor, “on account of," says Dom Gueranger, "the extraordinary gift of understanding wherewith God had blessed him," was born of noble parents, his father being Landulph, Count of Aquino, and his mother a rich Neapolitan lady, named Theodora. The exact date of his birth is not known, but most trustworthy authorities give it as 1227. At the age of five he was sent to the Benedictine monastery at Monte Cassino to receive his first training, which in the hands of a large-hearted and God-fearing man, resulted in so filling his mind with knowledge and his soul with God, that it is said the monks themselves would often approach by stealth to hear the words of piety and wisdom that fell from the lips of the precocious child when conversing with his companions. After remaining at Monte Cassino for seven years, engaged in study, St. Thomas, "the most saintly of the learned, and the most learned of the saints," returned to his family, in consequence of the sack of the abbey by the Imperial soldiers. From thence he was sent by his parents to the University of Naples then at the height of its prosperity, where, becoming intimate with the Fathers of the Dominican Order, and being struck, probably, by the devotedness and ability of the Dominican Professors in the University, he was induced to petition for admission into that order, though he was at that time not more than seventeen years of age. This step gave such umbrage to his mother that she caused him to be waylaid on the road to Paris (whither he was being hurried to escape from her), and to be kept for more than two years in prison, during which time his brothers, prompted by their mother, used all means, even the most infamous, to seduce him from religion. At last the Dominicans' influence with the Pope induced the latter to move the Emperor Frederick to order his release, when St. Thomas was at once hurried back to Naples by the delighted members of his order. He was afterwards sent to Rome, then to Paris, and thence to Cologne. At Cologne his studies were continued under the celebrated Albertus Magnus, with whom, in 1245, he was sent by the Dominican Chapter once more to Paris for study, under his direction, at the University. In 1248, when he had completed his three years' curriculum at Paris, St. Thomas was appointed, before he was twenty-three years of age, second professor and “magister studentium,” under Albertus, as regent, at the new Dominican school (on the model of that at Paris), which was established by the Dominicans in that year at Cologne. There he achieved in the schools a great reputation as a teacher, though he by no means confined himself to such work. He preached and wrote; his writings, even at that early age, were remarkable productions and gave promise of the depth and ability which mark his later productions. His sermons also at that time enabled him to attract large congregations into the Dominican church. In 1248 he was directed to take his degree at Paris; and though his modesty and dislike of honour and distinction made the proposal distasteful to him, he set out and begged his way thither; but it was not until October 23rd, 1257, that he took his degree. The interval was filled by such labours in writing, lecturing, and preaching, as to enable him by the time he became a doctor to exercise an influence over the men and ideas of his time which we at this time can scarcely realise. So much was this the case that Louis IX. insisted upon St. Thomas becoming a member of his Council of State, and referred every question that came up for deliberation to him the night before, that he might reflect on it in solitude. At this time he was only thirty-two years of age. In 1259 he was appointed, by the Dominican Chapter at Valenciennes, a member of a Commission, in company with Albertus Magnus and Pierre de Tarentaise, to establish order and uniformity in all schools of the Dominicans. In 1261 the Pope, Urban IV., immediately upon his election to the Pontifical throne, sent for St. Thomas to aid him in his project for uniting into one the Eastern and Western Churches. St. Thomas in that same year came to Rome, and was at once appointed by the General of his Order to a chair of theology in the Dominican College in that city, where he obtained a like reputation to that which he had secured already at Paris and Cologne. Pope Urban being anxious to reward his services offered him, first the Patriarchate of Jerusalem, and then a Cardinal's hat, but he refused both. After lecturing, at the request of the Pope, with great success at Vitervo, Orvieto, Perugia, and Fondi, he was sent, in 1263, as "Definitor," in the name of the Roman Province, to the Dominican Chapter held in London. Two years later Clement IV., who succeeded Urban as Pope, appointed him, by bull, to the archbishopric of Naples, conferring on him at the same time the revenues of the convent of St. Peter ad Aram. But this appointment he also declined. In 1269 he was summoned to Paris—his last visit— to act as "Definitor" of the Roman Province at the General Chapter of his Order, and he remained there until 1271, when his superiors recalled him to Bologna. In 1272, after visit¬ing Rome on the way, he went to Naples to lecture at the University. His reception in that city was an ovation. All classes came out to welcome him, while the King, Charles I., as a mark of royal favour bestowed on him a pension. He remained at Naples until he was summoned, in 1274, by Pope Gregory X., by special bull, to attend the Second Council of Lyons, but whilst on the journey thither he was called to his rest. His death took place in the Benedictine Abbey of Fossa Nuova in the diocese of Terracina, on the 7th of March 1274, being barely forty-eight years of age. St. Thomas was a most voluminous writer, his principal work being the celebrated Summa Theologiae, which, although never completed, was accepted as such an authority as to be placed on a table in the council-chamber at the Council of Trent alongside of the Holy Scriptures and the Decrees of the Popes. But it is outside the province of this work to enlarge on his prose works. Though not a prolific writer of hymns, St. Thomas has contributed to the long list of Latin hymns some which have been in use in the services of the Church of Rome from his day to this. They are upon the subject of the Lord's Supper. The best known are:— Pange lingua gloriosi Corporis Mysterium; Adoro te devote latens Deitas; Sacris sollemniis juncta sint gaudia; Lauda Sion Salvatorem; and Verbum supernum prodiens. The 1st, 3rd, and 5th of these are found in the Roman Breviary, the 2nd, 4th, and 5th in Newman's Hymni Ecclesiae; the 4th in the Roman Missal; all of them appear in Daniel; the 2nd and 4th in Mone; and the 2nd, 4th, and 5th in Königsfeld. Of these hymns numerous translations have been made from time to time, and amongst the translators are found Caswall, Neale, Woodford, Morgan, and others. [Rev. Digby S. Wrangham, M.A.] -- Excerpts from John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907)

Harry Dixon Loes

1895 - 1965 Person Name: H. D. L. Author of "There Is No Other Name" in Songs of Faith Pseudonyms: Deal Bartells Born Harold Loes, the American gospel song writer took the middle name Dixon in honour of A. C. Dixon, the pastor of Moody Church at the time. Harry Dixon Loes studied at Moody Bible Institute, and after extensive training in music he served a number of churches with a ministry of music. From 1939 until his retirement he was a member of the music faculty of Moody Bible Institute. He wrote the lyrics for 1,500 gospel songs, and composed 3,000 tunes. One day in 1915, Paul Rader preached a sermon in Moody Church, in Chicago. His theme was, “All that I want is in Jesus.” In the congregation was young Harry Dixon Loes, then a senior at Moody Bible Institute, where he would eventually teach. Inspired by Dr. Rader’s message, Harry Loes wrote the words and music for a song he called "All Things in Jesus." It was first sung by the church’s youth group. Friends all around me are trying to find What the heart yearns for, by sin undermined; I have the secret, I know where ’tis found: Only true pleasures in Jesus abound. All that I want is in Jesus. He satisfies, joy He supplies; Life would be worthless without Him; All things in Jesus I find. Some carry burdens whose weight has for years Crushed them with sorrow and blinded with tears. Yet One stands ready to help them just now, If they will humbly in penitence bow. --http://wordwisehymns.com/2010/02/09/ ================== Harry Dixon Loes was born in Kalamazoo, Michigan, on October 20, 1892. After serving several churches as music director and later being active for more than twelve years in evangelist work, he joined the music faculty of Moody Bible Institute, in 1939, where he remained as a popular music teacher until his death in 1965. Mr. Loes was the writer of numerous gospel songs and choruses. One day, while listening to a sermon on the subject of Christ's atonement entitled “Blessed Redeemer,” Mr. Loes was inspired to compose this tune. He then sent the melody with the suggested title to Mrs. Christiansen, a friend for many years, asking her to write the text. The hymn first appeared in Songs of Redemption, compiled by Marin and Jelks, in 1920, and published by the Baptist Home Mission Board, Atlanta, Georgia. --http://www.gracecommunitycog.org/

Hymnals

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Published hymn books and other collections

Small Church Music

Editors: Francis Pott Description: The SmallChurchMusic site was commenced in 2006 grew out of the requests from those struggling to provide suitable music for their services and meetings. Rev. Clyde McLennan was ordained in mid 1960’s and was a pastor in many small Australian country areas, and therefore was acutely aware of this music problem. Having also been trained as a Pipe Organist, recordings on site (which are a subset of the smallchurchmusic.com site) are all actually played by Clyde, and also include piano and piano with organ versions. All recordings are in MP3 format. Churches all around the world use the recordings, with downloads averaging over 60,000 per month. The recordings normally have an introduction, several verses and a slowdown on the last verse. Users are encouraged to use software: Audacity (http://www.audacityteam.org) or Song Surgeon (http://songsurgeon.com) (see http://scm-audacity.weebly.com for more information) to adjust the MP3 number of verses, tempo and pitch to suit their local needs. Copyright notice: Rev. Clyde McLennan, performer in this collection, has assigned his performer rights in this collection to Hymnary.org. Non-commercial use of these recordings is permitted. For permission to use them for any other purposes, please contact manager@hymnary.org. Home/Music(smallchurchmusic.com) List SongsAlphabetically List Songsby Meter List Songs byTune Name About  

Songs of Israel's Glory (The Messiah)

Publication Date: 1935 Publisher: Biblical Research Society Publication Place: Los Angeles, Calif. Editors: David L. Cooper; Biblical Research Society

Christian Classics Ethereal Hymnary

Publication Date: 2007 Publisher: Grand Rapids, MI: Christian Classics Ethereal Library



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