Search Results

Switch back to the old search page.Advanced Search
All:avarice

Looking for other resources related to Avarice? Check out PreachingandWorship.org.

Texts

text icon
Text authorities
TextImage

Our Father, Thou in Heaven Above

Author: Martin Luther Meter: 8.8.8.8.8.8 Appears in 25 hymnals First Line: Our Father, Thou in heav'n above Lyrics: ... , Free from all care and avarice. 6 Forgive our sins, Lord ... Topics: Prayer Scripture: Matthew 6:9-12 Used With Tune: VATER UNSER Text Sources: Tr. composite
TextImage

How bless'd the upright in the way!

Appears in 3 hymnals Lyrics: ... , And leave it not to avarice. 37 From all vain objects ... Scripture: Psalm 119
Image

Let avarice from shore to shore

Author: S. Stennett Appears in 76 hymnals

Tunes

tune icon
Tune authorities
TextImageAudio

VATER UNSER

Meter: 8.8.8.8.8.8 Appears in 132 hymnals Tune Sources: "Geistliche Lieder," Leipzig, 1539 Tune Key: g minor Incipit: 55345 32155 47534 Used With Text: Our Father, Thou in Heaven Above
TextImage

[Blessed are they that perfect are]

Appears in 4 hymnals Tune Key: d minor Incipit: 15452 34243 21715 Used With Text: Beati immaculati
TextImage

WAVERTREE

Composer: William Shore Appears in 14 hymnals Tune Key: D Major Incipit: 33354 42166 65553 Used With Text: Our Father dear, who art in heav'n

Instances

instance icon
Published text-tune combinations (hymns) from specific hymnals
TextImage

Let avarice from shore to shore

Hymnal: A New Selection of Hymns; designed for the use of conference meetings, private circles, and congregations, as a supplement to Dr. Watts' Psalms and Hymns #32 (1812) Meter: 8.6.8.6 Lyrics: 1 Let avarice from shore to shore Her ... Languages: English
Image

Let avarice from [borne] shore to shore

Author: Samuel Stennett Hymnal: Selection of Hymns from the Best Authors, intended to be an Appendix to Dr. Watts' Psalms and Hymns. (1st Am. ed.) #XLV (1792)
Image

Let avarice from shore to shore

Author: S. Stennett Hymnal: A Selection of Hymns and Spiritual Songs #H.XIX (1809)

People

person icon
Authors, composers, editors, etc.

Samuel Stennett

1727 - 1795 Author of "Let avarice from shore to shore" Samuel Stennett was born at Exeter, in 1727. His father was pastor of a Baptist congregation in that city; afterwards of the Baptist Chapel, Little Wild Street, London. In this latter pastorate the son succeeded the father in 1758. He died in 1795. Dr. Stennett was the author of several doctrinal works, and a few hymns. --Annotations of the Hymnal, Charles Hutchins, M.A. 1872. ====================== Stennett, Samuel, D.D., grandson of Joseph Stennett, named above, and son of the Rev. Joseph Stennett, D.D., was born most pro;bably in 1727, at Exeter, where his father was at that time a Baptist minister. When quite young he removed to London, his father having become pastor of the Baptist Church in Little Wild Street, Lincoln's Inn Fields. In 1748, Samuel Stennett became assistant to his father in the ministry, and in 1758 succeeded him in the pastoral office at Little Wild Street. From that time until his death, on Aug. 24, 1795, he held a very prominent position among the Dissenting ministers of London. He was much respected by some of the statesmen of the time, and used his influence with them in support of the principles of religious freedom. The celebrated John Howard was a member of his congregation and an attached friend. In 1763, the University of Aberdeen conferred on him the degree of D.D. Dr. S. Stennett's prose publications consist of volumes of sermons, and pamphlets on Baptism and on Nonconformist Disabilities. He wrote one or two short poems, and contributed 38 hymns to the collection of his friend, Dr. Rippon (1787). His poetical genius was not of the highest order, and his best hymns have neither the originality nor the vigour of some of his grandfather's. The following, however, are pleasing in sentiment and expression, and are in common use more especially in Baptist congregations:— 1. And have I, Christ, no love for Thee? Love for Christ desired. 2. And will the offended God again? The Body the Temple of the Holy Ghost. 3. As on the Cross the Saviour hung. The Thief on the Cross. 4. Behold the leprous Jew. The healing of the Leper. 5. Come, every pious heart. Praise to Christ. 6. Father, at Thy call, I come. Lent. 7. Great God, amid the darksome night. God, a Sun. 8. Great God, what hosts of angels stand. Ministry of Angels. 9. Here at Thy Table, Lord, we meet. Holy Communion. 10. How charming is the place. Public Worship. 11. How shall the sons of men appear? Acceptance through Christ alone. 12. How soft the words my [the] Saviour speaks. Early Piety. 13. How various and how new. Divine Providence. 14. Not all the nobles of the earth. Christians as Sons of God. 15. On Jordan's stormy banks I stand. Heaven anticipated. 16. Prostrate, dear Jesus, at thy feet. Lent. Sometimes, "Dear Saviour, prostrate at Thy feet." 17. Should bounteous nature kindly pour. The greatest of these is Love. From this, "Had I the gift of tongues," st. iii., is taken. 18. Thy counsels of redeeming grace. Holy Scripture. From "Let avarice, from shore to shore." 19. Thy life 1 read, my dearest Lord. Death in Infancy. From this "'Tis Jesus speaks, I fold, says He." 20. 'Tis finished! so the Saviour cried. Good Friday. 21. To Christ, the Lord, let every tongue. Praise of Christ. From this,"Majestic sweetness sits enthroned," st. iii., is taken. 22. To God, my Saviour, and my King. Renewing Grace. 23. To God, the universal King. Praise to God. 24. What wisdom, majesty, and grace. The Gospel. Sometimes, “What majesty and grace." 25. Where two or three with sweet accord. Before the Sermon. 26. Why should a living man complain? Affliction. From this, "Lord, see what floods of sorrow rise," st. iii., is taken. 27. With tears of anguish I lament. Lent. 28. Yonder amazing sight I see. Good Friday. All these hymns, with others by Stennett, were given in Rippon's Baptist Selection, 1787, a few having previously appeared in A Collection of Hymns for the use of Christians of all Denominations, London. Printed for the Booksellers, 1782; and No. 16, in the 1778 Supplement to the 3rd edition of the Bristol Baptist Selection of Ash and Evans. The whole of Stennett's poetical pieces and hymns were included in vol. ii. of his Works, together with a Memoir, by W. J. Jones. 4 vols., 1824. [Rev. W. R. Stevenson, M.A.] --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907)

Johann Sebastian Bach

1685 - 1750 Person Name: Jo­hann S. Bach Harmonizer of "VATER UNSER" in The Cyber Hymnal Johann Sebastian Bach was born at Eisenach into a musical family and in a town steeped in Reformation history, he received early musical training from his father and older brother, and elementary education in the classical school Luther had earlier attended. Throughout his life he made extraordinary efforts to learn from other musicians. At 15 he walked to Lüneburg to work as a chorister and study at the convent school of St. Michael. From there he walked 30 miles to Hamburg to hear Johann Reinken, and 60 miles to Celle to become familiar with French composition and performance traditions. Once he obtained a month's leave from his job to hear Buxtehude, but stayed nearly four months. He arranged compositions from Vivaldi and other Italian masters. His own compositions spanned almost every musical form then known (Opera was the notable exception). In his own time, Bach was highly regarded as organist and teacher, his compositions being circulated as models of contrapuntal technique. Four of his children achieved careers as composers; Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven, Mendelssohn, Schumann, Brahms, and Chopin are only a few of the best known of the musicians that confessed a major debt to Bach's work in their own musical development. Mendelssohn began re-introducing Bach's music into the concert repertoire, where it has come to attract admiration and even veneration for its own sake. After 20 years of successful work in several posts, Bach became cantor of the Thomas-schule in Leipzig, and remained there for the remaining 27 years of his life, concentrating on church music for the Lutheran service: over 200 cantatas, four passion settings, a Mass, and hundreds of chorale settings, harmonizations, preludes, and arrangements. He edited the tunes for Schemelli's Musicalisches Gesangbuch, contributing 16 original tunes. His choral harmonizations remain a staple for studies of composition and harmony. Additional melodies from his works have been adapted as hymn tunes. --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907)

Martin Luther

1483 - 1546 Person Name: M. Luther, 1483-1546 Author of "Our Father, Thou in Heaven Above" in Evangelical Lutheran Hymnary Luther, Martin, born at Eisleben, Nov. 10, 1483; entered the University of Erfurt, 1501 (B.A. 1502, M.A.. 1503); became an Augustinian monk, 1505; ordained priest, 1507; appointed Professor at the University of Wittenberg, 1508, and in 1512 D.D.; published his 95 Theses, 1517; and burnt the Papal Bull which had condemned them, 1520; attended the Diet of Worms, 1521; translated the Bible into German, 1521-34; and died at Eisleben, Feb. 18, 1546. The details of his life and of his work as a reformer are accessible to English readers in a great variety of forms. Luther had a huge influence on German hymnody. i. Hymn Books. 1. Ellich cristlich lider Lobgesang un Psalm. Wittenberg, 1524. [Hamburg Library.] This contains 8 German hymns, of which 4 are by Luther. 2. Eyn Enchiridion oder Handbuchlein. Erfurt, 1524 [Goslar Library], with 25 German hymns, of which 18 are by Luther. 3. Geystliche Gesangk Buchleyn. Wittenberg, 1524 [Munich Library], with 32 German hymns, of which 24 are by Luther. 4. Geistliche Lieder auffs new gebessert. Wittenberg. J. Klug, 1529. No copy of this book is now known, but there was one in 1788 in the possession of G. E. Waldau, pastor at Nürnberg, and from his description it is evident that the first part of the Rostock Gesang-Buch, 1531, is a reprint of it. The Rostock Gesang-Buch, 1531, was reprinted by C. M. Wiechmann-Kadow at Schwerin in 1858. The 1529 evidently contained 50 German hymns, of which 29 (including the Litany) were by Luther. 5. Geistliche Lieder auffs new gebessert. Erfurt. A. Rauscher, 1531 [Helmstädt, now Wolfenbüttel Library], a reprint of No. 4. 6. Geistliche Lieder. Wittenberg. J. Klug, 1535 [Munich Library. Titlepage lost], with 52 German hymns, of which 29 are by Luther. 7. Geistliche Lieder auffs new gebessert. Leipzig. V. Schumann, 1539 [Wernigerode Library], with 68 German hymns, of which 29 are by Luther. 8. Geistliche Lieder. Wittenberg. J. Klug, 1543 [Hamburg Library], with 61 German hymns, of which 35 are by Luther. 9. Geystliche Lieder. Leipzig. V. Babst, 1545 [Gottingen Library]. This contains Luther's finally revised text, but adds no new hymns by himself. In pt. i. are 61 German hymns, in pt. ii. 40, of which 35 in all are by Luther. For these books Luther wrote three prefaces, first published respectively in Nos. 3, 4, 9. A fourth is found in his Christliche Geseng, Lateinisch und Deudsch, zum Begrebnis, Wittenberg, J. Klug, 1542. These four prefaces are reprinted in Wackernagel’s Bibliographie, 1855, pp. 543-583, and in the various editions of Luther's Hymns. Among modern editions of Luther's Geistliche Lieder may be mentioned the following:— Carl von Winterfeld, 1840; Dr. C. E. P. Wackernagel, 1848; Q. C. H. Stip, 1854; Wilhelm Schircks, 1854; Dr. Danneil, 1883; Dr. Karl Gerok, 1883; Dr. A. F. W. Fischer, 1883; A. Frommel, 1883; Karl Goedeke, 1883, &c. In The Hymns of Martin Luther. Set to their original melodies. With an English version. New York, 1883, ed. by Dr. Leonard Woolsey Bacon and Nathan H. Allen, there are the four prefaces, and English versions of all Luther's hymns, principally taken more or less altered, from the versions by A. T. Russell, R. Massie and Miss Winkworth [repub. in London, 1884]. Complete translations of Luther's hymns have been published by Dr. John Anderson, 1846 (2nd ed. 1847), Dr. John Hunt, 1853, Richard Massie, 1854, and Dr. G. Macdonald in the Sunday Magazine, 1867, and his Exotics, 1876. The other versions are given in detail in the notes on the individual hymns. ii. Classified List of Luther's Hymns. Of Luther's hymns no classification can be quite perfect, e.g. No. 3 (see below) takes hardly anything from the Latin, and No. 18 hardly anything from the Psalm. No. 29 is partly based on earlier hymns (see p. 225, i.). No. 30 is partly based on St. Mark i. 9-11, and xvi., 15, 16 (see p. 226, ii.). No. 35 is partly based on St. Luke ii. 10-16. The following arrangement, however, will answer all practical purposes. A. Translations from the Latin. i. From Latin Hymns: 1. Christum wir sollen loben schon. A solis ortus cardine 2. Der du bist drei in Einigkeit. O Lux beata Trinitas. 3. Jesus Christus unser Heiland, Der von. Jesus Christus nostra salus 4. Komm Gott Schopfer, heiliger Geist. Veni Creator Spiritus, Mentes. 5. Nun komm der Beidenheiland. Veni Redemptor gentium 6. Was flirchst du Feind Herodes sehr. A solis ortus cardine ii. From Latin Antiphons, &c.: 7. Herr Gott dich loben wir. Te Deum laudamus. 8. Verleih uns Frieden gnädiglich. Dapacem, Domine 9. Wir glauben all an einen Gott. iii. Partly from the Latin, the translated stanzas being adopted from Pre-Reformation Versions: 10. Komm, heiliger Geist, Herre Gott. 11. Mitten wir im Leben sind. Media vita in morte sumus. B. Hymns revised and enlarged from Pre-Reformation popular hymns. 12. Gelobet seist du Jesus Christ. 13. Gott der Vater wohn uns bei. 14. Gott sei gelobet und gebenedeiet. 15. Nun bitten wir den heiligen Geist. C. Psalm versions. 16. Ach Gott vom Himmel, sieh darein. 17. Aus tiefer Noth schrei ich zu dir. 18. Ein' feste Burg ist unser Gott. 19. Es spricht der Unweisen Mund wohl. 20. Es wollt uns Gott genädig sein. 21. War Gott nicht mit uns diese Zeit. 22. Wohl dem, der in Gotten Furcht steht. D. Paraphrases of other portions of Holy Scripture. 23. Diess sind die heilgen zehn Gebot. 24. Jesaia dem Propheten das geschah. 25. Mensch willt du leben seliglich. 26. Mit Fried und Freud ich fahr dahin. 27. Sie ist mir lieb die werthe Magd. 28. Vater unser im Himmelreich. E. Hymns mainly Original. 29. Christ lag in Todesbanden. 30. Christ unser Herr zum Jordan kam. 31. Ein neues Lied wir heben an. 32. Erhalt uns Herr bei deinem Wort. 33. Jesus Christus unser Heiland, Der den, 34. Nun freut euch lieben Christengemein. 35. Vom Himmel hoch da komm ich her. 36. Vom Himmel kam der Engel Schaar. In addition to these — 37. Fur alien Freuden auf Erden. 38. Kyrie eleison. In the Blätter fur Hymnologie, 1883, Dr. Daniel arranges Luther's hymns according to what he thinks their adaptation to modern German common use as follows:— i. Hymns which ought to be included in every good Evangelical hymn-book: Nos. 7-18, 20, 22, 28, 29, 30, 32, 34, 35, 36, 38. ii. Hymns the reception of which into a hymn-book might be contested: Nos. 2, 3, 4, 19, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 33. iii. Hymns not suited for a hymn-book: Nos. 1, 5, 6, 27, 31, 37. [Rev. James Mearns, M.A.] --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907)



Advertisements