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Search Results

All:baptism

Looking for other resources related to Baptism? Check out PreachingandWorship.org.

Texts

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Baptism of Children

Appears in 448 hymnals Topics: Sacraments/Rites Anointing of the Sick

Baptism

Appears in 9 hymnals First Line: When John (though a man) Lyrics: ... seed, And so for my baptism a right have to plead ... this we may see, Our baptism to be For none but ... whole Trinity, To honor our baptism do jointly agree. 12 We ...
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A Hymn for Baptism

Appears in 29 hymnals First Line: Come ye redeemed of the Lord Lyrics: ... spirit, heavenly dove, On these baptismal waters move; That we, through ...

Tunes

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Tune authorities
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GLORIA

Composer: Austin C. Lovelace; Edward Shippen Barnes Meter: 7.7.7.7 with refain Appears in 136 hymnals Tune Sources: French carol melody Tune Key: F Major Incipit: 33355 43323 53213 Used With Text: Angels We Have Heard on High
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AWAY IN A MANGER

Composer: James R. Murray Meter: 11.11.11.11 Appears in 106 hymnals Tune Key: F Major Incipit: 55433 21176 55565 Used With Text: Away in a Manger
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KINGS OF ORIENT

Composer: John H. Hopkins, Jr. Meter: 8.8.4.4.6 with refrain Appears in 82 hymnals Tune Key: e minor Incipit: 54312 32154 31232 Used With Text: We Three Kings

Instances

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Published text-tune combinations (hymns) from specific hymnals
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One sole baptismal sign

Author: Geo. Robinson Hymnal: The Hymnal, Revised and Enlarged, as adopted by the General Convention of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the United States of America in the year of our Lord 1892 #492 (1894) Meter: 6.6.6.6.8.8 Lyrics: 1 One sole baptismal sign, One Lord, below, above, ... Topics: Unity Languages: English Tune Title: [One sole baptismal sign]
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Baptism an Embodiment

Author: Alexander Campbell Hymnal: Chalice Hymnal #377 (1995) First Line: Baptism is a sort of embodiment Lyrics: Baptism is a sort of embodiment ... in a single act. In baptism we are passive in every ... . Hence in no view of baptism can it be called a ... Topics: The Church at Worship Baptism; God's Church The Church at Worship: Baptism; Baptism

Once in the Blest Baptismal Waters

Author: Emilie Juliane von Schwartzburg-Rudolstadt, 1637-1706 Hymnal: Lutheran Service Book #598 (2006) Meter: 9.8.9.8.8.8 Refrain First Line: O God, for Jesus' sake I pray Lyrics: Once in the blest baptismal waters I put on ... Topics: Baptismal Life Scripture: Galatians 3:26-27 Languages: English Tune Title: WER WEISS, WIE NAHE

People

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Authors, composers, editors, etc.

Martin Luther

1483 - 1546 Author of "I Am Baptized" in Chalice Hymnal Luther, Martin, born at Eisleben, Nov. 10, 1483; entered the University of Erfurt, 1501 (B.A. 1502, M.A.. 1503); became an Augustinian monk, 1505; ordained priest, 1507; appointed Professor at the University of Wittenberg, 1508, and in 1512 D.D.; published his 95 Theses, 1517; and burnt the Papal Bull which had condemned them, 1520; attended the Diet of Worms, 1521; translated the Bible into German, 1521-34; and died at Eisleben, Feb. 18, 1546. The details of his life and of his work as a reformer are accessible to English readers in a great variety of forms. Luther had a huge influence on German hymnody. i. Hymn Books. 1. Ellich cristlich lider Lobgesang un Psalm. Wittenberg, 1524. [Hamburg Library.] This contains 8 German hymns, of which 4 are by Luther. 2. Eyn Enchiridion oder Handbuchlein. Erfurt, 1524 [Goslar Library], with 25 German hymns, of which 18 are by Luther. 3. Geystliche Gesangk Buchleyn. Wittenberg, 1524 [Munich Library], with 32 German hymns, of which 24 are by Luther. 4. Geistliche Lieder auffs new gebessert. Wittenberg. J. Klug, 1529. No copy of this book is now known, but there was one in 1788 in the possession of G. E. Waldau, pastor at Nürnberg, and from his description it is evident that the first part of the Rostock Gesang-Buch, 1531, is a reprint of it. The Rostock Gesang-Buch, 1531, was reprinted by C. M. Wiechmann-Kadow at Schwerin in 1858. The 1529 evidently contained 50 German hymns, of which 29 (including the Litany) were by Luther. 5. Geistliche Lieder auffs new gebessert. Erfurt. A. Rauscher, 1531 [Helmstädt, now Wolfenbüttel Library], a reprint of No. 4. 6. Geistliche Lieder. Wittenberg. J. Klug, 1535 [Munich Library. Titlepage lost], with 52 German hymns, of which 29 are by Luther. 7. Geistliche Lieder auffs new gebessert. Leipzig. V. Schumann, 1539 [Wernigerode Library], with 68 German hymns, of which 29 are by Luther. 8. Geistliche Lieder. Wittenberg. J. Klug, 1543 [Hamburg Library], with 61 German hymns, of which 35 are by Luther. 9. Geystliche Lieder. Leipzig. V. Babst, 1545 [Gottingen Library]. This contains Luther's finally revised text, but adds no new hymns by himself. In pt. i. are 61 German hymns, in pt. ii. 40, of which 35 in all are by Luther. For these books Luther wrote three prefaces, first published respectively in Nos. 3, 4, 9. A fourth is found in his Christliche Geseng, Lateinisch und Deudsch, zum Begrebnis, Wittenberg, J. Klug, 1542. These four prefaces are reprinted in Wackernagel’s Bibliographie, 1855, pp. 543-583, and in the various editions of Luther's Hymns. Among modern editions of Luther's Geistliche Lieder may be mentioned the following:— Carl von Winterfeld, 1840; Dr. C. E. P. Wackernagel, 1848; Q. C. H. Stip, 1854; Wilhelm Schircks, 1854; Dr. Danneil, 1883; Dr. Karl Gerok, 1883; Dr. A. F. W. Fischer, 1883; A. Frommel, 1883; Karl Goedeke, 1883, &c. In The Hymns of Martin Luther. Set to their original melodies. With an English version. New York, 1883, ed. by Dr. Leonard Woolsey Bacon and Nathan H. Allen, there are the four prefaces, and English versions of all Luther's hymns, principally taken more or less altered, from the versions by A. T. Russell, R. Massie and Miss Winkworth [repub. in London, 1884]. Complete translations of Luther's hymns have been published by Dr. John Anderson, 1846 (2nd ed. 1847), Dr. John Hunt, 1853, Richard Massie, 1854, and Dr. G. Macdonald in the Sunday Magazine, 1867, and his Exotics, 1876. The other versions are given in detail in the notes on the individual hymns. ii. Classified List of Luther's Hymns. Of Luther's hymns no classification can be quite perfect, e.g. No. 3 (see below) takes hardly anything from the Latin, and No. 18 hardly anything from the Psalm. No. 29 is partly based on earlier hymns (see p. 225, i.). No. 30 is partly based on St. Mark i. 9-11, and xvi., 15, 16 (see p. 226, ii.). No. 35 is partly based on St. Luke ii. 10-16. The following arrangement, however, will answer all practical purposes. A. Translations from the Latin. i. From Latin Hymns: 1. Christum wir sollen loben schon. A solis ortus cardine 2. Der du bist drei in Einigkeit. O Lux beata Trinitas. 3. Jesus Christus unser Heiland, Der von. Jesus Christus nostra salus 4. Komm Gott Schopfer, heiliger Geist. Veni Creator Spiritus, Mentes. 5. Nun komm der Beidenheiland. Veni Redemptor gentium 6. Was flirchst du Feind Herodes sehr. A solis ortus cardine ii. From Latin Antiphons, &c.: 7. Herr Gott dich loben wir. Te Deum laudamus. 8. Verleih uns Frieden gnädiglich. Dapacem, Domine 9. Wir glauben all an einen Gott. iii. Partly from the Latin, the translated stanzas being adopted from Pre-Reformation Versions: 10. Komm, heiliger Geist, Herre Gott. 11. Mitten wir im Leben sind. Media vita in morte sumus. B. Hymns revised and enlarged from Pre-Reformation popular hymns. 12. Gelobet seist du Jesus Christ. 13. Gott der Vater wohn uns bei. 14. Gott sei gelobet und gebenedeiet. 15. Nun bitten wir den heiligen Geist. C. Psalm versions. 16. Ach Gott vom Himmel, sieh darein. 17. Aus tiefer Noth schrei ich zu dir. 18. Ein' feste Burg ist unser Gott. 19. Es spricht der Unweisen Mund wohl. 20. Es wollt uns Gott genädig sein. 21. War Gott nicht mit uns diese Zeit. 22. Wohl dem, der in Gotten Furcht steht. D. Paraphrases of other portions of Holy Scripture. 23. Diess sind die heilgen zehn Gebot. 24. Jesaia dem Propheten das geschah. 25. Mensch willt du leben seliglich. 26. Mit Fried und Freud ich fahr dahin. 27. Sie ist mir lieb die werthe Magd. 28. Vater unser im Himmelreich. E. Hymns mainly Original. 29. Christ lag in Todesbanden. 30. Christ unser Herr zum Jordan kam. 31. Ein neues Lied wir heben an. 32. Erhalt uns Herr bei deinem Wort. 33. Jesus Christus unser Heiland, Der den, 34. Nun freut euch lieben Christengemein. 35. Vom Himmel hoch da komm ich her. 36. Vom Himmel kam der Engel Schaar. In addition to these — 37. Fur alien Freuden auf Erden. 38. Kyrie eleison. In the Blätter fur Hymnologie, 1883, Dr. Daniel arranges Luther's hymns according to what he thinks their adaptation to modern German common use as follows:— i. Hymns which ought to be included in every good Evangelical hymn-book: Nos. 7-18, 20, 22, 28, 29, 30, 32, 34, 35, 36, 38. ii. Hymns the reception of which into a hymn-book might be contested: Nos. 2, 3, 4, 19, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 33. iii. Hymns not suited for a hymn-book: Nos. 1, 5, 6, 27, 31, 37. [Rev. James Mearns, M.A.] --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907)

Communauté de Taizé

Person Name: Taizé Community Author of "There Is One Lord" in Worship (3rd ed.) The Taizé Community is a community ecumenical based in Taize in France. Founded in 1940 by Brother Roger, it brings together a hundred brothers from around the world and have chosen to live together a life of prayer and celibacy in simplicity. The unity of Christian denominations and care for young adults are among the commitments of the Community since its inception. The Taizé Community was founded in Taizé in 1940 by Brother Roger Schutz, with the goal of "building a life together in which the gospel of reconciliation would be a concretely lived reality" . During the war he helps people in difficulty and hosts German refugees. In 1942, the Gestapo threatened to arrest brother Roger, who fled to Switzerland until the end of the war. After liberation, he returned to where the Taizé brothers join different churches. The ecumenical monastic community and lives by his labor and his newspaper writing. It hosts thousands of young people each year who come to pray and meditate. Brother Roger said of himself: "I found my Christian identity by reconciling within myself the faith of my origins with the mystery of evangelical Catholic faith." Over the years develops the Taizé Community. Companions join brother Roger: community consists currently when brothers coming from around thirty nations and various Christian origins (70 to Taize and some thirty others in other small communities). The community accepts for itself in no gift. The brothers earn their living by their work: they make pottery, jewelery (Taizé Cross pendant), stained glass they sell in a shop located in the community. Their personal inheritances are offered to the poor. By rule, they are committed for life, and have taken a vow of obedience to the prior of the community. The Taizé songs are sung by the worshiping community, with times and translations in various languages. The celebrations include long moments of silence for meditation. Thousands of young people everywhere and all sorts of religious denominations visit Taizé several decades. Taizé offers them hospitality and they can integrate with focus groups, Bible study and prayer together. The Church of Reconciliation was built in 1962 at the initiative of a German organization wishing to make a symbolic gesture of Franco-German reconciliation. In 2005, the death of Brother Roger, Brother Alois, Brother Roger designated his lifetime (according to the rule of the community), succeeded him as prior. In the late sixties and especially after the movements of May 1968, many young people come to Taizé. At Easter, from 1970, until they are 40 000 to gather around the community. One begins to enlarge the church at Taizé by capitals. The French are there many especially during the Thanksgiving holiday, the rest of the year the brothers are young people around the world. Everyone is invited to participate in the Youth Council, in the "dynamics of provisional." This council was not established, but relayed to churches for religious structures open to these new aspirations Life in Taizé is punctuated by prayers. The form of these prayers is particularly suited to young . The brothers and the young people are sitting on the carpet in the Church of Reconciliation. This modular building has sliding walls to accommodate the number of participants. Songs of Taizé, a passage from the gospel, a time of silence, meditations, prayers are linked for 40 to 50 minutes. Biblical introductions are prepared by brothers and follow a path over a full week. This may be a tour of a gospel full taking various passages, or on a specific theme of the Bible. The brother has an explanation of the text by making it as accessible as possible to young people. Given the international population, the brothers usually speak English and organize translations for those less familiar language. After an explanation from 30 to 60 minutes, the brother of organizing small groups (between 5 and 15 people) for young people to share and exchange their understanding of the text and how they live it everyday. Groups are organized for young people of different nationalities, languages ​​or religious denomination meet. The exchanges are in English but often solutions are always found to allow all to participate. Hubs are trading time on a specific theme: about society, matter of faith or meeting a crop. They are often presented by people who are experts in the field. The work is distributed according to the needs of the week with the arrival of young people. These are work groups that allow once again bring together youth from different countries. But it is also essential for the functioning of the reception of all young people. Dishwasher, garbage, organization of the meal, cleaning ... are spots of interest as well as sharing time. Depending on the number of young people present, participants are housed in barracks for 6 and 12 persons, or in tents. Meals are delivered by volunteers to young people arranged in rows to allow for rapid distribution. Advise the brothers to stay from Sunday to next Sunday, which can live a full week to meet God and others. Therefore, Sunday is a special day that is completely oriented welcoming newcomers, especially in the summer months where you have to accommodate between 1,000 and 4,000 youth in the day. Long before the fall of the Berlin Wall, the Taizé brothers went quietly in the countries of Eastern Europe meet young people, where the primary contact with Taizé Eastern Europe. Since 1978, Taizé organized for New Year meetings of five days in a European city as the Pilgrimage of Trust on Earth. Tens of thousands of young people attend and are hosted in the homes or community centers. The pilgrimage is structured on the life of Taizé. The community also hosts yearly international meetings on a smaller scale. These are meetings that particularly affect young people of the continent where the meeting. They are often organized in countries experiencing economic difficulties or political. Such gatherings are a time to support local churches. The presence of young people from other continents, even in small numbers, therefore, shows the support of young people worldwide. --www.wikipedia.org

Anonymous

Person Name: anonymous Author of "我們受洗與主同葬, (Buried in baptism with our Lord)" in 生命聖詩 - Hymns of Life, 1986 In some hymnals, the editors noted that a hymn's author is unknown to them, and so this artificial "person" entry is used to reflect that fact. Obviously, the hymns attributed to "Author Unknown" "Unknown" or "Anonymous" could have been written by many people over a span of many centuries.

Hymnals

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Baptismal Harmonies

Publication Date: 1862 Publisher: Sheldon & Co. Publication Place: New York Editors: Edmund Turney; Sheldon & Co.

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Series: Celebration. Guitar: Yes. Instrumental Parts: C Instrument. Accompaniment: Keyboard. Pages:…
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