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All:compassion

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Jesus, Full of All Compassion

Author: Daniel Turner Meter: 8.7.8.7 Appears in 147 hymnals First Line: Jesus, Jesus, full of all compassion Lyrics: ... . Jesus, Jesus, full of all compassion, Hear Thy humble suppliant’s ... Used With Tune: BARTIMAEUS Text Sources: Baptist Collection by Ash and Evans (Bristol, England: 1769)
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Hope of the World

Author: Georgia Elma Harkness Meter: 11.10.11.10 Appears in 54 hymnals First Line: Hope of the world, Thou Christ of great compassion Topics: Citizenship, Christian; Memorial Day; National Righteousness; Righteousness; Social Betterment

Jesus, thou art all compassion

Author: Charles Wesley Appears in 3 hymnals

Tunes

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COMPASSION

Composer: David L. Edwards; Susan Adams Meter: Irregular Appears in 1 hymnal Tune Key: C Major Incipit: 34555 55555 45432 Used With Text: Fill the World with Love
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COMPASSION

Composer: William H. Doane, 1832-1915; Henry J. VanAndel Meter: 7.7.7.7.7.5.7.7.7.7 Appears in 61 hymnals Tune Key: A Flat Major Incipit: 55534 56551 7176 Used With Text: Though Your Sins Be as Scarlet
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FAITHFULNESS

Composer: William M. Runyan Meter: 11.10.11.10 with refrain Appears in 99 hymnals Tune Key: E Flat Major Incipit: 33332 24444 36765 Used With Text: Great Is Thy Faithfulness

Instances

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Published text-tune combinations (hymns) from specific hymnals

Healer of Boundless Compassion

Hymnal: Evangelical Lutheran Worship #219 (2006) Lyrics: of boundless compassion, peace for our ... Topics: Service Music Languages: English Tune Title: [Healer of boundless compassion]
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God of Compassion, in Mercy Befriend Us

Author: John J. Moment Hymnal: Rejoice in the Lord #39 (1985) Meter: 11.11.11.11 Lyrics: 1 God of compassion, in mercy befriend us; giver ... Topics: God Compassion Scripture: Isaiah 63:9 Languages: English Tune Title: O QUANTA QUALIA

The Lord is compassion and love

Hymnal: The New English Hymnal #536 (1986) Lyrics: Lord is compassion and ... Topics: Lent Scripture: Psalm 103 Languages: English Tune Title: [The Lord is compassion and love]

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Authors, composers, editors, etc.

Charles Wesley

1707 - 1788 Author (attributed to) of "God Of Infinite Compassion" in The Cyber Hymnal Charles Wesley, M.A. was the great hymn-writer of the Wesley family, perhaps, taking quantity and quality into consideration, the great hymn-writer of all ages. Charles Wesley was the youngest son and 18th child of Samuel and Susanna Wesley, and was born at Epworth Rectory, Dec. 18, 1707. In 1716 he went to Westminster School, being provided with a home and board by his elder brother Samuel, then usher at the school, until 1721, when he was elected King's Scholar, and as such received his board and education free. In 1726 Charles Wesley was elected to a Westminster studentship at Christ Church, Oxford, where he took his degree in 1729, and became a college tutor. In the early part of the same year his religious impressions were much deepened, and he became one of the first band of "Oxford Methodists." In 1735 he went with his brother John to Georgia, as secretary to General Oglethorpe, having before he set out received Deacon's and Priest's Orders on two successive Sundays. His stay in Georgia was very short; he returned to England in 1736, and in 1737 came under the influence of Count Zinzendorf and the Moravians, especially of that remarkable man who had so large a share in moulding John Wesley's career, Peter Bonier, and also of a Mr. Bray, a brazier in Little Britain. On Whitsunday, 1737, he "found rest to his soul," and in 1738 he became curate to his friend, Mr. Stonehouse, Vicar of Islington, but the opposition of the churchwardens was so great that the Vicar consented that he "should preach in his church no more." Henceforth his work was identified with that of his brother John, and he became an indefatigable itinerant and field preacher. On April 8, 1749, he married Miss Sarah Gwynne. His marriage, unlike that of his brother John, was a most happy one; his wife was accustomed to accompany him on his evangelistic journeys, which were as frequent as ever until the year 1756," when he ceased to itinerate, and mainly devoted himself to the care of the Societies in London and Bristol. Bristol was his headquarters until 1771, when he removed with his family to London, and, besides attending to the Societies, devoted himself much, as he had done in his youth, to the spiritual care of prisoners in Newgate. He had long been troubled about the relations of Methodism to the Church of England, and strongly disapproved of his brother John's "ordinations." Wesley-like, he expressed his disapproval in the most outspoken fashion, but, as in the case of Samuel at an earlier period, the differences between the brothers never led to a breach of friendship. He died in London, March 29, 1788, and was buried in Marylebone churchyard. His brother John was deeply grieved because he would not consent to be interred in the burial-ground of the City Road Chapel, where he had prepared a grave for himself, but Charles said, "I have lived, and I die, in the Communion of the Church of England, and I will be buried in the yard of my parish church." Eight clergymen of the Church of England bore his pall. He had a large family, four of whom survived him; three sons, who all became distinguished in the musical world, and one daughter, who inherited some of her father's poetical genius. The widow and orphans were treated with the greatest kindness and generosity by John Wesley. As a hymn-writer Charles Wesley was unique. He is said to have written no less than 6500 hymns, and though, of course, in so vast a number some are of unequal merit, it is perfectly marvellous how many there are which rise to the highest degree of excellence. His feelings on every occasion of importance, whether private or public, found their best expression in a hymn. His own conversion, his own marriage, the earthquake panic, the rumours of an invasion from France, the defeat of Prince Charles Edward at Culloden, the Gordon riots, every Festival of the Christian Church, every doctrine of the Christian Faith, striking scenes in Scripture history, striking scenes which came within his own view, the deaths of friends as they passed away, one by one, before him, all furnished occasions for the exercise of his divine gift. Nor must we forget his hymns for little children, a branch of sacred poetry in which the mantle of Dr. Watts seems to have fallen upon him. It would be simply impossible within our space to enumerate even those of the hymns which have become really classical. The saying that a really good hymn is as rare an appearance as that of a comet is falsified by the work of Charles Wesley; for hymns, which are really good in every respect, flowed from his pen in quick succession, and death alone stopped the course of the perennial stream. It has been the common practice, however for a hundred years or more to ascribe all translations from the German to John Wesley, as he only of the two brothers knew that language; and to assign to Charles Wesley all the original hymns except such as are traceable to John Wesley through his Journals and other works. The list of 482 original hymns by John and Charles Wesley listed in this Dictionary of Hymnology have formed an important part of Methodist hymnody and show the enormous influence of the Wesleys on the English hymnody of the nineteenth century. -- Excerpts from John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907) ================== Charles Wesley, the son of Samuel Wesley, was born at Epworth, Dec. 18, 1707. He was educated at Westminster School and afterwards at Christ Church, Oxford, where he graduated M.A. In 1735, he took Orders and immediately proceeded with his brother John to Georgia, both being employed as missionaries of the S.P.G. He returned to England in 1736. For many years he engaged with his brother in preaching the Gospel. He died March 29, 1788. To Charles Wesley has been justly assigned the appellation of the "Bard of Methodism." His prominence in hymn writing may be judged from the fact that in the "Wesleyan Hymn Book," 623 of the 770 hymns were written by him; and he published more than thirty poetical works, written either by himself alone, or in conjunction with his brother. The number of his separate hymns is at least five thousand. --Annotations of the Hymnal, Charles Hutchins, M.A., 1872.

Gregory Murray

1905 - 1992 Person Name: Dom Gregory Murray Composer of "[The Lord is compassion and love]" in The New English Hymnal Dom Gregory Murray OSB, organist and composer, died at Downside Abbey on January 19th 1992 aged 86. he was born in Fulham, London on February 27, 1905 DOM Gregory Murray enhanced the music of the Roman Catholic Church, and latterly that of other denominations, almost by stealth. His music is sung every Sunday in thousands of churches throughout the English-speaking world: a case of everybody knowing the tune but few knowing the name of the composer. His influence through such simple music as A People's Mass (with sales of over two million copies), his psalm tones, organ music and hymn tunes reached far, although he had more or less withdrawn from public life half a century ago. Anthony Gregory Murray was educated at Westminster Cathedral Choir School when Sir Richard Terry was Master of the Music, and St Benedict's, Ealing. He was ordained in 1932 for Downside Abbey and spent most of the rest of his life there except for periods at Ealing during the war and as parish priest of Hindley, Lancashire, from 1948 to 1952. He was parish priest of St Benedict's, Stratton-on-the-Fosse, from 1952 to 1987, a position he combined with his domestic duties. In 1923 he became a fellow of the Royal College of Organists and read for the historical tripos at Cambridge, graduating in 1929. Murray was a brilliant organist, regular broadcasts from the Compton organ at Downside led to the folk tale among musicians that the abbey was permanently hooked up to the BBC. He was particularly noted for his skill at improvising. Those with acute hearing and their wits about them would frequently detect a musical quotation from another work, not necessarily sacred in nature. He was an authority on Gregorian Chant, publishing two books on the subject. It was a measure of his honesty that, once he had changed his mind about the rhythmic basis of plainsong, the second more or less contradicted the first. He disowned his Gregorian Rhythm: a Pilgrim's Progress (1934) in the October 1957 edition of The Score, later giving his reasons in Gregorian Chant According to the Manuscripts (1963). Two of his hymn tunes were published in the widely esteemed Hymns Ancient & Modern (New Standard). Outside of music his interests encompassed the gospel of St Matthew, football, cricket, tennis and chess. He complained during his last illness that the greatest privation of being sick was his inability to play the latter four, especially football. The sharp wit of his early years had mellowed to a delightful humour which he retained to the end. His over-riding interest as a musician was to provide music that would enhance the Roman Catholic liturgy. (when the Church of England later took to his music with enthusiasm he was delighted). His reflections on the place of music as a servant of the liturgy are recorded in Music and the Mass (1977). He wrote for the old Latin liturgy, but as a keen vemacularist he seized the opportunities offered by the reforms of the Second Vatican Council and continued composing until a few months before his death. He was always threatening to stop writing, once describing music to his publisher as "a bore and a chore", but he never did and his Chorale Prelude on Marienlied was published on the day his death was announced. His four books of Short Organ Interludes for Liturgical use are a blessing for parish organists. --www.nottsorganists.co.uk

Chas. H. Gabriel

1856 - 1932 Person Name: Charles Hutchinson Gabriel Composer of "[Like a compass on the sea]" in The Cyber Hymnal Pseudonymns: C. D. Emerson, S. B. Jackson, Jennie Ree

Hymnals

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Published hymn books and other collections

Small Church Music

Editors: Charles Wesley Description: The SmallChurchMusic site was commenced in 2006 grew out of the requests from those struggling to provide suitable music for their services and meetings. Rev. Clyde McLennan was ordained in mid 1960’s and was a pastor in many small Australian country areas, and therefore was acutely aware of this music problem. Having also been trained as a Pipe Organist, recordings on site (which are a subset of the smallchurchmusic.com site) are all actually played by Clyde, and also include piano and piano with organ versions. All recordings are in MP3 format. Churches all around the world use the recordings, with downloads averaging over 60,000 per month. The recordings normally have an introduction, several verses and a slowdown on the last verse. Users are encouraged to use software: Audacity (http://www.audacityteam.org) or Song Surgeon (http://songsurgeon.com) (see http://scm-audacity.weebly.com for more information) to adjust the MP3 number of verses, tempo and pitch to suit their local needs. Copyright notice: Rev. Clyde McLennan, performer in this collection, has assigned his performer rights in this collection to Hymnary.org. Non-commercial use of these recordings is permitted. For permission to use them for any other purposes, please contact manager@hymnary.org. Home/Music(smallchurchmusic.com) List SongsAlphabetically List Songsby Meter List Songs byTune Name About  

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