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Texts

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What a Covenant

Author: Elisha A. Hoffman Meter: 5.5.9 D with refrain Appears in 559 hymnals First Line: What a covenant, what a joy divine Refrain First Line: Leaning, leaning Lyrics: 1 What a *covenant, what a joy divine, leaning ... Topics: Fears; Peace Inner Scripture: Deuteronomy 33:27 Used With Tune: LEANING
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This Holy Covenant Was Made

Author: Sylvia Dunstan, 1955-1993 Meter: 8.8.4.4.8.8 with alleluias Appears in 4 hymnals Refrain First Line: Alleluia, alleluia Lyrics: This holy covenant was made; God, ... Topics: Faith Scripture: Hebrews 10 Used With Tune: LASST UNS ERFREUEN
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Great Is Thy Faithfulness

Author: Thomas O. Chrisholm, 1866-1960 Meter: 11.10.11.10 with refrain Appears in 169 hymnals First Line: Great is thy faithfulness, O God my Father! Topics: Promise and Covenant Scripture: Genesis 8:22 Used With Tune: FAITHFULNESS

Tunes

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COVENANT

Composer: Jay D. Locklear; Adam Seate Meter: Irregular Appears in 1 hymnal Tune Key: F Major Incipit: 33211 32333 33431 Used With Text: Covenant Prayer
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COVENANT

Appears in 33 hymnals Tune Sources: Covenant Hymn Incipit: 11621 71531 1164 Used With Text: Jesus, great High Priest of our profession
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COVENANT

Composer: John Stainer Meter: 6.6.8.4 D Appears in 15 hymnals Incipit: 51321 54312 71325

Instances

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Published text-tune combinations (hymns) from specific hymnals
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Keep Your Covenant With Jesus

Author: Martha C. Oliver Hymnal: Lutherförbundets Sångbok #E107 (1913) Meter: 8.7.8.7 D with chorus Lyrics: 1 Keep your covenant with Jesus, ‘Tis the least ... the end. Chorus: Keep your covenant with Jesus, To your pledge ... Topics: Warning-Admonition Languages: English Tune Title: [Keep your covenant with Jesus]
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Keep Your Covenant With Jesus

Author: Martha C. Oliver Hymnal: Songs of the Kingdom #93 (1896) Lyrics: 1 Keep your covenant with Jesus, ‘Tis the least ... the end. Refrain: Keep your covenant with Jesus, To your pledge ... Topics: Loyalty Scripture: Psalm 89:34 Languages: English Tune Title: [Keep your covenant with Jesus]

Let Us Enter into Covenant

Author: Norbert Farrell Hymnal: Lead Me, Guide Me (2nd ed.) #762 (2012) First Line: Let us enter into covenant with Christ Refrain First Line: Alleluia! It's a sign of love! Lyrics: Let us enter into covenant with Christ, ... Topics: Covenant Scripture: John 1:36 Tune Title: [Let us enter into covenant with Christ]

People

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Authors, composers, editors, etc.

Philip Doddridge

1702 - 1751 Person Name: Philip Doddridge, 1702-1751 Author of "My God, The Covenant of Thy Love" in The Cyber Hymnal Philip Doddridge (b. London, England, 1702; d. Lisbon, Portugal, 1751) belonged to the Non-conformist Church (not associated with the Church of England). Its members were frequently the focus of discrimination. Offered an education by a rich patron to prepare him for ordination in the Church of England, Doddridge chose instead to remain in the Non-conformist Church. For twenty years he pastored a poor parish in Northampton, where he opened an academy for training Non-conformist ministers and taught most of the subjects himself. Doddridge suffered from tuberculosis, and when Lady Huntington, one of his patrons, offered to finance a trip to Lisbon for his health, he is reputed to have said, "I can as well go to heaven from Lisbon as from Northampton." He died in Lisbon soon after his arrival. Doddridge wrote some four hundred hymn texts, generally to accompany his sermons. These hymns were published posthumously in Hymns, Founded on Various Texts in the Holy Scriptures (1755); relatively few are still sung today. Bert Polman ======================== Doddridge, Philip, D.D., was born in London, June 26, 1702. His grandfather was one of the ministers under the Commonwealth, who were ejected in 1662. His father was a London oilman. He was offered by the Duchess of Bedford an University training for ordination in the Church of England, but declined it. He entered Mr. Jennings's non-conformist seminary at Kibworth instead; preached his first sermon at Hinckley, to which Mr. Jennings had removed his academy. In 1723 he was chosen pastor at Kibworth. In 1725 he changed his residence to Market Harborough, still ministering at Kibworth. The settled work of his life as a preceptor and divine began in 1729, with his appointment to the Castle Hill Meeting at Northampton, and continued till in the last stage of consumption. He sailed to Lisbon, in 1751, where he died October 26, the same year. Two hundred pupils in all, gathered from England, Scotland and Holland, were prepared in his seminary, chiefly for the dissenting ministry, but partly for professions. The wide range of subjects, including daily readings in Hebrew and Greek, Algebra, Trigonometry, Watts' Logic, outline of Philosophy, and copious Divinity, is itself a proof of Doddridge's learning. He was presented with his D.D. degree by the University of Aberdeen. His fame as a divine, combined with his wide sympathies and gentle, unaffected goodness, won for him the friendship of Watts, Col. Gardiner and Hervey, and the esteem of Seeker and Warburton. He welcomed the work of Wesley and Whitefield, and entertained the latter on his visit to Northampton. His Rise and Progress of Religion in the Soul and The Family Expositor both did good work in their day. For criticism of his hymns see English Hymnody, Early, § XIV. [Rev. H. Leigh Bennett, M.A.] After Dr. Doddridge's death his hymns were published by his friend Job Orton, in 1755, as:— "Hymns founded on Various Texts in the Holy Scriptures. By the late Reverend Philip Doddridge, D.D. Published from the Author's Manuscript by Job Orton . . . Salop. Printed by J. Eddowes and J. Cotton, &c. MDCCLV." Concerning the text of the hymns, Orton says in his Preface:— "There may perhaps be some improprieties, owing to my not being able to read the author's manuscript in particular places, and being obliged, without a poetical genius, to supply those deficiencies, whereby the beauty of the stanza may be greatly defaced, though the sense is preserved." The 1st edition contained 370 hymns; the 2nd, 1759, 374; and the 3rd, 1766, and later editions, 375. In 1839 Doddridge's great-grandson re-edited the hymns from the original manuscript and published the same as:— Scriptural Hymns by the Rev. Philip Doddridge, D.D. New and corrected edition containing many hymns never before printed. Edited from the Original Documents by the Author's great-grandson, John Doddridge Humphreys, Esq. Lond. Darton & Clark, 1839. This work contains 22 additional hymns. The text differs in many instances from Orton's, but these changes have not come into common use. In addition to the manuscript used by Orton and J. D. Humphreys, another containing 100 hymns (five of which are not in any edition of the Hymns), all in the author's handwriting, and most of them dated, is referred to in this Dictionary as the "D. Manuscripts." It is the property of Mr. W. S. Booker and family. A manuscript, not in Doddridge's handwriting, of 77 "Hymns by P. Doddridge, Mar. 16, 1739/1740," is in the possession of Mr. W. T. Brooke. The existence of these manuscripts is accounted for from the fact that Doddridge's hymns were freely circulated in manuscript during his lifetime. It is from his correspondence with R. Blair (q.v.) that the few compositions traceable to him in the Scottish Trans. & Paraphrases were derived. The hymns by Doddridge which have attained to the greatest popularity are:— “Awake, my soul, stretch every nerve"; " Do not I love Thee, O my Lord? " "Grace 'tis a charming sound”; " Hark, the glad sound, the Saviour comes"; "My God, and is Thy table spread?" "O happy day, that fixed my choice"; "O God of Jacob [Bethel], by Whose hand”; " See Israel's gentle Shepherd stand"; "Ye servants of the Lord." These hymns, with many besides, are annotated under their respective first lines. Of the rest, taken from the Hymns, &c, 1755, the following are also in common use:— 1. Behold the gloomy vale. Death anticipated. 2. Behold the Great Physician stands. Christ the Physician. 3. Captives of Israel, hear. Spiritual Deliverance. 4. Eternal God, our wondering souls. Enoch's Piety and Translation. 5. Eternal Source of life and thought. Subjection to the Father. G. Exalted Prince of Life, we own. Christ the Prince and Saviour. 7. Father Divine, the Saviour cried. Christ's Submission to the Father. 8. Father Divine, Thy piercing eye. Secret Prayer. 9. Father of mercies, send Thy grace. Sympathy. The Good Samaritan. 10. Go, saith the Lord, proclaim my grace. Forgiveness. 11. God of Eternity, from Thee. Redeeming the Time. 12. God of my life, through all its [my] days. Praising God continually. 13. God. of salvation, we adore. Praise to God for Redemption. 14. Great Father of mankind. Gentiles brought into the Church. 15. Great God, we sing that mighty hand. The New Tear. 16. Great Leader of Thine Israel's host. During Persecution. 17. Great Lord of angels, we adore. Ordination. 18. Great Spirit of immortal love. Purity of Heart desired. 19. Great Teacher of Thy Church, we own. The Divine Precepts. 20. Hail, everlasting Prince of Peace. Sympathy. 21. Hail to the Prince of life and peace. Praise to Christ. 22. Hear, gracious [Saviour] Sovereign, from Thy throne. The Blessings of the Holy Spirit desired. 23. How gentle God's commands. God's Care of His Own. 24. How rich Thy favours, God of grace. God and His Living Temple. 25. How swift the torrent flows [rolls]. Our Fathers, where are they? 26. Jesus the Lord, our souls adore. Christ the Forerunner. 27. Jesus, we own Thy Sovereign hand. Christ to be fully known hereafter. 28. Loud let the tuneful trumpet sound. Gospel Jubilee. 29. My gracious Lord, I own Thy right. Life in Jesus. 30. My [Dear] Saviour, I am [we are] Thine. Joined to Christ through the Spirit. 31. My soul, with all thy waking powers. The Choice of Moses. 32. Now let our voices join. Singing in the ways of God. 33. 0 injured Majesty of heaven. Lent. 34. 0 Zion, tune thy voice. Glory of the Church of Christ. 35. Peace, 'tis the Lord Jehovah's hand. Resignation. 36. Praise the Lord of boundless might. The Father of Lights. 37. Praise to Thy Name, Eternal God. Growth in Grace desired. 38. Remark, my soul, the narrow bounds. The New Year. 39. Repent, the Voice celestial cries. Lent. 40. Return, my roving heart, return. Heart communing. 41. Salvation, O melodious sound. God our Salvation. 42. Saviour of men, and Lord of love. Ministry and Death of Christ. 43. Searcher of hearts, before Thy face. Peter to Simon Magus. 44. Shepherd of Israel, Thou dost keep. Induction or Settlement of a Minister. 45. Shine forth, eternal Source of light. Knowledge of God desired. 46. Shine on our souls, eternal God. Sunday. 47. Sing, ye redeemed of the Lord. Joy on the Homeward Way. 48. Sovereign of life, before Thine eye. Life and Death in God's hands. 49. The darkened sky, how thick it lours. Sorrow followed by Joy. 50. The day approacheth, O my soul. Judgment anticipated. 51. The King of heaven His table spreads. The Gospel Feast. 52. The promises I sing. The unchanging promises of God. 53. The swift-declining day. Walk in the Light. 54. These mortal joys, how soon they fade. Treasures, Perishable and Eternal. 55. Thy judgments cry aloud. Retributive Providence. 56. Thy presence, Everlasting God. Omnipresence of the Father. 57. 'Tis mine, the covenant of His grace. Death anticipated. 58. To Thee, my God; my days are known. Life under the eye of God. 59. Tomorrow, Lord, is Thine. Uncertainty of Life. 60. Triumphant Lord, Thy goodness reigns. The Divine Goodness. 61. Triumphant Zion, lift thy head. The Church Purified and Guarded. 62. Unite my roving thoughts, unite. Peace. 63. What mysteries, Lord, in Thee combine. Christ, the First and Last. 64. While on the verge of life I stand. Death anticipated with Joy. 65. With ecstacy of Joy. Christ the Living Stone. 66. Ye golden lamps of heaven, farewell. Heaven opening. 67. Ye hearts with youthful vigour warm. The Young encouraged. 68. Ye humble souls, that seek the Lord. Easter. 69. Ye sons of men, with joy record. Praise of the Works of God. 70. Yes, the Redeemer rose. Easter In Dr. Hatfield's Church HymnBook, N. Y., 1872, Nos. 9, 12, 14, 15, 21, 23, 25, 29, 30, 32, 34, 35, 39, 40, 44, 47, 51, 61, 64, 65, 67, 69, 70, as above, are dated 1740. What authority there may be for this date we cannot say, these hymns not being in any “D. MSS." with which we are acquainted, and no dates are given in the Hymns, &c, 1755. Some later American editors have copied this date from Dr. Hatfield. Doddridge's hymns are largely used by Unitarians both in Great Britain and America. As might be expected, the Congregationalists also draw freely from his stores. The Baptists come next. In the hymnals of the Church of England the choicest, only are in use. Taken together, over one-third of his hymns are in common usage at the present time. -- John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907) ================ Doddridge, Philip, D.D. At p. 305 an account is given of a manuscript volume of Doddridge's Hymns, which is the property of the Rooker family. Since that article was written another manuscript vol. has been found. It was the property of Lady Frances Gardiner, née Erskine, an intimate friend of Doddridge, and wife of Col. Gardiner. It is a copy of the Rooker manuscipt, with the revised text, as in the margin of that ms., and is in Doddridge's hand¬writing. It was from this manuscript that the Doddridge hymns were taken for the Scottish Translationsand Paraphrases, 1745. Additional hymns by Dr. Doddridge still in common use include:— 1. My God, how cheerful is the sound. All in Christ. 2. My Saviour, let me hear Thy voice. Pardon desired. 3. My soul, triumphant in the Lord. Divine Guidance assured. 4. No «iore, ye wise, your wisdom boast. Glorying in God alone. From Hymns, No. 128. 5. Now be that Sacrifice survey'd. Christ our Sacrifice. 6. 0 Israel, blest beyond compare. Happiness of God's Israel. 7. Our fathers, where are they? Considering the Past. From Hymns, No. 164. 8. Praise to the Lord on high. Missions. 9. Praise to the radiant Source of bliss. Praise for Divine Guidance. 10. Return, my soul, and seek thy rest. Rest in Jesus. 11. Salvation doth to God belong. National Thanksgiving. 12. Sovereign of Life, I own Thy hand. On Recovery from Sickness. 13. The sepulchres, how thick they stand. Burial. 14. There is a Shepherd kind and strong. The Good Shepherd. From Hymns, No. 216. 15. Wait on the Lord, ye heirs of hope. Waiting on God. 16. We bless the eternal Source of light. Christ's care of the Church. 17. With transport, Lord, our souls proclaim. Immutability of Christ. 18. Ye mourning saints, whose streaming tears. Death and Burial. These all appeared in Dr. Doddridge's Hymns, 1755. --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology, Appendix, Part II (1907)

Charles C. Converse

1832 - 1918 Person Name: Charles C. Converse, 1832-1918 Composer of "ERIE" in The Covenant Hymnal Pseudonyms: Nevers, Karl Re­den, Revons ================================= Charles Crozat Converse LLD USA 1832-1918. Born in Warren, MA, he went to Leipzig, Germany to study law and philosophy, as well as music theory and composition under Moritz Hauptmann, Friedrich Richter, and Louis Plaidy at the Leipzig Conservatory. He also met Franz Liszt and Louis Spohr. He became an author, composer, arranger and editor. He returned to the states in 1859 and graduated from the Albany, NY, Law School two years later. He married Lida Lewis. From 1875 he practiced law in Erie, PA, and also was put in charge of the Burdetta Organ Company. He composed hymn tunes and other works. He was offered a DM degree for his Psalm 126 cantata, but he declined the offer. In 1895 Rutherford College honored him with a LLD degree. He spent his last years in Highwood, NJ, where he died. He published “New method for the guitar”, “Musical bouquet”, “The 126th Psalm”, “Sweet singer”, “Church singer”, “Sayings of Sages” between 1855 and 1863. he also wrote the “Turkish battle polka” and “Rock beside the sea” ballad, and “The anthem book of the Episcopal Methodist Church”. John Perry

Andrew Reed

1787 - 1862 Person Name: Andrew Reed, 1787-1862 Author of "Holy Spirit with Light Divine" in The Covenant Hymnal Reed, Andrew, D.D., son of Andrew Reed, was born in London on Nov. 27, 1787, and educated for the Congregational Ministry at Hackney College, London. He was first the pastor of the New Road Chapel, St. George's-in-the-East, and then of the Wycliffe Chapel, which was built through his exertions in 1830. His degree was conferred by Yule College, America. He died Feb. 25, 1862. As the founder of "The London Orphan Asylum," "The Asylum for Fatherless Children," “The Asylum for Idiots” "The Infant Orphan Asylum," and "The Hospital for Incurables," Dr. Reed is more fully known, and will be longer remembered than by his literary publications. His Hymn Book was the growth of years. The preparation began in 1817, when he published a Supplement to Watts, in which were a few originals. This was enlarged in 1825; and entirely superseded by his collection The Hymn Book, prepared from Dr. Watts's Psalms & Hymns and Other Authors, with some Originals, in 1842 (Preface). His hymns, mostly of a plain and practical character, numbering 21, were contributed to these various editions, and were republished with those of his wife in the Wycliffe Supplement, 1872. The best known are "Ah Jesus, let me hear Thy voice” and ”Spirit Divine, attend our prayer." All Dr. and Mrs. Reed's hymns are anonymous in The Hymn Book, 1842, but are given with their names in the Wyclife Supplement, 1872. His hymns now in common use include, in addition to those annotated under their respective first lines :— 1. Come, let us strike our harps afresh. Praise. 2. Come, my Redeemer, come. Desiring Christ's Presence. 3. Gentle Saviour, look on me. Christ's protection Desired. 4. Gracious Lord, as Thou hast taught us. Public Worship. 5. Hark, hark, the notes of joy. Missions. 6. Holy Ghost, with light divine (1817). Prayer to the Holy Spirit. Sometimes given as "Holy Ghost, Thou light divine;" and again as "Holy Spirit, Light divine." 7. Listen, sinner, mercy hails you. Invitation. Generally given as "Hear, O Sinner, mercy hails you." 8. Rich are the joys of solitude. Retirement. Some-times given as "How deep and tranquil is the joy." 9. There [comes] is an hour when I must part. Death anticipated. 10. Ye saints your music bring. Praise of the Cross. --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907)

Hymnals

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Published hymn books and other collections

The Covenant Hymnal

Publication Date: 1996 Publisher: Covenant Publications Publication Place: Chicago Editors: Evangelical Covenant Church

Covenant Hymnal

Publication Date: 1973 Publisher: Covenant Press Publication Place: Chicago Editors: J. I. Erickson; J. R. Hawkins; Covenant Press

Small Church Music

Editors: Thomas Olivers Description: The SmallChurchMusic site was launched in 2006, growing out of the requests from those struggling to provide suitable music for their services and meetings. Rev. Clyde McLennan was ordained in mid 1960’s and was a pastor in many small Australian country areas, and therefore was acutely aware of this music problem. Having also been trained as a Pipe Organist, recordings on site (which are a subset of the smallchurchmusic.com site) are all actually played by Clyde, and also include piano and piano with organ versions. All recordings are in MP3 format. Churches all around the world use the recordings, with downloads averaging over 60,000 per month. The recordings normally have an introduction, several verses and a slowdown on the last verse. Users are encouraged to use software: Audacity (http://www.audacityteam.org) or Song Surgeon (http://songsurgeon.com) (see http://scm-audacity.weebly.com for more information) to adjust the MP3 number of verses, tempo and pitch to suit their local needs. Copyright notice: Rev. Clyde McLennan, performer in this collection, has assigned his performer rights in this collection to Hymnary.org. Non-commercial use of these recordings is permitted. For permission to use them for any other purposes, please contact manager@hymnary.org. Home/Music(smallchurchmusic.com) List SongsAlphabetically List Songsby Meter List Songs byTune Name About  

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