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All:creed

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Texts

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The Apostles' Creed

Appears in 47 hymnals First Line: [The Apostles' Creed] Topics: Creeds Scripture: John 1:6-9
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Nicene Creed

Meter: Irregular Appears in 24 hymnals First Line: I believe in one God, the Father almighty Lyrics: I believe in one God, the Father almighty, Maker of heaven and earth, and of all things visible and invisible. And in one Lord Jesus Christ, the only begotten Son of God, begotten of the Father before all worlds; God of God, Light of Light, very God of ... Topics: Creeds; Creeds Used With Tune: DRAESEL Text Sources: Nicene Creed, 4th cent.
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The Apostle's Creed

Author: Anonymous Meter: 8.7.8.7 D Appears in 3 hymnals First Line: I believe in God the Father Lyrics: 1 I believe in God the Father, Maker of all heav'n and earth; and in Jesus Christ, our Savior, God's own Son, of matchless worth; by the Spirit was conceived, of the virgin Mary born, he in whom I have believed: God Almighty, Three in One. 2 Suffered under ... Topics: Service Music The Apostles' Creed Scripture: Romans 10:10 Used With Tune: MEAD HOUSE Text Sources: The Apostles' Creed, ca. 2nd cent. , 6th cent.

Tunes

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INNOCENTS

Appears in 255 hymnals Tune Sources: "The Parish Choir," 1850 Tune Key: D Major Incipit: 34517 65123 54323 Used With Text: Christian, Rise and Act Thy Creed
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CREDO (MILADIN)

Composer: George C. Miladin Meter: 8.6.8.6 D Appears in 1 hymnal Tune Key: D Major Used With Text: The Apostle's Creed
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AURELIA

Composer: Samuel Sebastian Wesley Appears in 676 hymnals Tune Sources: Selection of Psalms and Hymns , by C. Kemble, 1864 Tune Key: E Flat Major Incipit: 33343 32116 54345 Used With Text: The Church's One Foundation

Instances

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Published text-tune combinations (hymns) from specific hymnals
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Christian, Rise and Act Thy Creed

Author: F. A. Russell Hymnal: Songs of Service. Rev. ed. #a53 (1948) First Line: Christian, rise, and act thy creed Languages: English Tune Title: [Christian, rise, and act thy creed]
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Christian, Rise and Act Thy Creed

Author: F. A. Russell Hymnal: Songs of Service #53 (1918) First Line: Christian, rise, and act thy creed Languages: English Tune Title: [Christian, rise, and act thy creed]
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Christian, Rise and Act Your Creed

Author: Francis Albert Rollo Russell Hymnal: The New Century Hymnal #537 (1995) Meter: 7.7.7.7 Lyrics: ... Christian, rise and act thy creed; let your prayer be in ... Topics: Consecration; Discipleship; Gospel Call and Response; Service; Year B Proper 18; Year C Proper 24; Zeal Languages: English Tune Title: INNOCENTS

People

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Authors, composers, editors, etc.

George Frideric Handel

1685 - 1759 Person Name: G. F. Handel Composer of "INNOCENTS" in The Abingdon Song Book George Frideric Handel (b. Halle, Germany, 1685; d. London, England, 1759) became a musician and composer despite objections from his father, who wanted him to become a lawyer. Handel studied music with Zachau, organist at the Halle Cathedral, and became an accomplished violinist and keyboard performer. He traveled and studied in Italy for some time and then settled permanently in England in 1713. Although he wrote a large number of instrumental works, he is known mainly for his Italian operas, oratorios (including Messiah, 1741), various anthems for church and royal festivities, and organ concertos, which he interpolated into his oratorio performances. He composed only three hymn tunes, one of which (GOPSAL) still appears in some modern hymnals. A number of hymnal editors, including Lowell Mason, took themes from some of Handel's oratorios and turned them into hymn tunes; ANTIOCH is one example, long associated with “Joy to the World.” Bert Polman

John Bacchus Dykes

1823 - 1876 Composer of "BEATITUDO" in The Beacon Song and Service book As a young child John Bacchus Dykes (b. Kingston-upon-Hull' England, 1823; d. Ticehurst, Sussex, England, 1876) took violin and piano lessons. At the age of ten he became the organist of St. John's in Hull, where his grandfather was vicar. After receiving a classics degree from St. Catherine College, Cambridge, England, he was ordained in the Church of England in 1847. In 1849 he became the precentor and choir director at Durham Cathedral, where he introduced reforms in the choir by insisting on consistent attendance, increasing rehearsals, and initiating music festivals. He served the parish of St. Oswald in Durham from 1862 until the year of his death. To the chagrin of his bishop, Dykes favored the high church practices associated with the Oxford Movement (choir robes, incense, and the like). A number of his three hundred hymn tunes are still respected as durable examples of Victorian hymnody. Most of his tunes were first published in Chope's Congregational Hymn and Tune Book (1857) and in early editions of the famous British hymnal, Hymns Ancient and Modern. Bert Polman

Frederick Lucian Hosmer

1840 - 1929 Author of "One thought I have, my ample creed" in The Beacon Song and Service book Hosmer, Frederick Lucian, B.A., was born at Framingham, Mass., in 1840, and educated at Harvard, where he graduated B.A. in 1869. Entering the Unitarian Ministry in 1872 he has held charges in Quincy, Ill., 1872-77; Cleveland, Ohio, 1878-92; St. Louis, 1894-99; and since 1899, at Berkeley, Cal. His Way of Life, 1877, was a compilation of Prayers and Responsive Services for Sunday Schools. Of Unity Hymns and Carols, 1880, he was joint editor with W. C. Gannett and J. V. Blake. His hymns were published jointly by him and W. C. Gannett (q.v.), as The Thought of God in Hymns and Poems (Boston: Little, Brown & Co.), 1st Series, 1885; 2nd Series, 1894. Of his 56 hymns in this work the following have come into common use, for the most part during the past ten years:— 1. Father, to Thee we look in all our sorrow. [Trust in God.] Written in 1881 upon the death of a member of the author's congregation, and published in The Thought of God, 1st Series, 1885. 2. From age to age how grandly rise. [Unity.] Written for the annual festival of the Free Religious Assoc, Boston, June 2, 1899, and first published in Souvenir Festival Hymns, 1899. Subsequently altered by the author to "From age to age the prophet's vision." 3. From age to age they gather, all the brave of heart and strong. [Victory of Truth.] "Written in 1891 for the Dedication of Unity Church, Decorah, Iowa, and published in The Thought of God, 2nd Series, 1894. 4. From many ways and wide apart. [College or School Reunion.] Dated in The Thought of God, 2nd Series, 1894, as having been written in 1890. 5. Go not, my soul, in search of Him. [God Within.] Written in 1879, printed in the Boston Christian Register, May 31, 1879, and included in The Thought of God, 1st Series, 1885, with the title, "The Indwelling God." 6. I cannot think of them as dead. [Eternal Life.] Written in 1882, and first published in The Thought of God, 1st Series, 1885, and entitled "My Dead." in the English collections it is usually given as "We cannot think of them as dead." 7. I little see, I little know. [Trust.] "A Psalm of Trust," written in 1883, first appeared in the Boston Christian Register, and again in The Thought of God, 1st Series, 1885. 8. Immortal by their deed and word. [The Spirit of Jesus.] Written in 1880, and first published in Unity Hymns and Carols, Chicago, Ill., 1880, and then in The Thought of God, 1st Series, 1885. 9. Many things in life there are. [Mystery in all Things.] Written in 1885, and first published in The Thought of God, 1st Series, 1885, with the title "Passing Understanding," and the quotation "The Peace of God which passeth all understanding." 10. Not always on the mount may we. [On the Mount.] This lesson from the Transfiguration was written in 1882, and published in the Chicago Unity, April 1, 1884. After revision by the author, it was included in the 1st Series of The Thought of God, 1885. 11. Not when, with self dissatisfied. [Lent.] Written in 1891, and given in The Thought of God, 2nd series, 1894, p. 33. It is in The Public School Hymn Book, 1903, and others. 12. O beautiful, my country. [National Hymn.] As “Our Country," written in 1884, and published in the Chicago Unity Festivals, 1884; and again in The Thought of God, 1885. 13. O Light, from age to age the same. [Dedication Anniversary.] Written in 1890 for the fiftieth anniversary of the Second Congregational Church (Unitarian), Quincy, 111. Included in The Thought of God, 2nd Series, 1894, and entitled "From Generation to Generation." 14. O Lord of Life, where'er they be. [Life in God.] "Written in 1888 for Easter service in Author's own church," and first published in the Chicago Unit, and again in The Thought of God, 2nd Series, 1894. The "Alleluia!" refrain, which is added in some collections to each verse, is appended, in the original, to the last verse only. 15. O Name, all other names above. [Trust in God.] Under the title "Found. 'They that know Thy name will put their trust in Thee!’ this hymn, written in 1878, was given in The Thought of God, 1st Series, 1885. 16. O Prophet souls of all the years. [Unity.] “Written in 1893 for, and sung at, the Unitarian gathering in connection with The World's Parliament of Religions (World's Fair), Chicago, Sep., 1893," and included in The Thought of God, 2nd Series, 1894, and entitled "One Law, One Life, one Love." 17. O Thou, in all Thy might so far. [God All in All.] This hymn, given in The Thought of God, 1st Series, 1885, with the title "The Mystery of God," was written in 1876, and first published in the New York Inquirer. 18. O thou in lonely vigil led. This encouragement for lonely workers was written for the "Emerson Commemoration, W. U. C, 1888," and included in The Thought of God, 2nd Series, 1894. 19. O Thou, Who art of all that is. [Divine Guidance.] Under the title "Through unknown paths," this hymn was included in The Thought of God, 1st Series, 1885. It was written in 1877. 20. O Thou, Whose Spirit witness bears. [Dedication of a Place of Worship.] Written for the Dedication of First Unitarian Church, Omaha, Feb. 6, 1891, and published in The Thought of God, 2nd Series, 1894, with the title "The Inward Witness," and the subscription "For T. K., Omaha, 1801." 21. On eyes that watch through sorrow's night. [Easter] A Carol for Easter Morn, written in 1890 for the author's congregation, and published in The Thought of God, 2nd Series, 1894. 22. One thought I have, my ample creed. [The Thought of God.] This is the initial hymn to the collection The Thought of God, 1st Series, 1885, and supplies the title to the work. It was written in 1880, and first published in the Chicago Unity Hymns and Carols, 1880, and then in The Thought of God, 1885. 23. The rose is queen among the flowers. [Flower Service.] "Written in 1875, first published in The Sunnyside, a song book for Sunday Schools, and again in The Thought of God, 1st Series, 1885, under the title "Flower Sunday." 24. Thy kingdom come, — on bended knee. [Missions.] "Written in 1891 for the Commencement of the Meadville Theological School (Meadville, Pa.), June 12, 1891, and published in The Thought of God, 2nd Series, 1894," under the title "The Day of God," and the subscription, "M. T. S., June 12, 1891." 25. We pray no more, made lowly wise, For miracle and sign. [Greater Faith Desired.] Written in 1879, and first published in The Christian Register (Boston), Mar. 22 of that year, under the title 'The Larger Faith.'" Included under the same title in The Thought of God, 1st Series, 1885. Sometimes given as "Made lowly wise, we pray no more." 26. When courage fails, and faith burns low. [Victory of Truth.] Under the title "Loyalty," this hymn was given in The Thought of God, 1st Series, 1885. It was written in 1881. 27. Where men on mounts of vision Have passed the veil within. [Dedication of a Place of Worship.] "Written in 1891 for the Dedication of First Unitarian Church, Oakland, California." Included in The Thought of God, 2nd Series, 1894, entitled "Holy Places," and subscribed " For C. W. W., Oakland, Cal., 1891." These annotations are from manuscript notes supplied to us by the author. Of these hymns all are in common use in America, and more than one half in Great Britain, mainly by Unitarians and Congregationalists. Amongst Unitarian hymn-writers of the last twenty years Mr. Hosmer is the most powerful and original known to us. --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology, New Supplement (1907)

Hymnals

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Published hymn books and other collections
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The Psalms of David

Publication Date: 1767 Publisher: James Parker Publication Place: New York Editors: Francis Hopkinson; James Parker

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