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When God Almighty came to earth (God on earth)

Author: John L. Bell, b. 1949; Graham Maule, b. 1958 Meter: 8.8.8.8 Appears in 3 hymnals First Line: When God Almighty came to earth Lyrics: had to meet, the cynic's smile he had to ... Topics: Faith, Trust and Commitment; Year B Third Sunday Before Advent; Year A Proper 7; Year A Proper 5; Year A Epiphany 3; The Wholeness of Creation; Redemption and Salvation; Ordination/Commissioning; Human Rights; Year C Proper 8 Scripture: Luke 5:27 Used With Tune: O WALY WALY

When the Son of God Was Dying

Author: The Iona Community Meter: 11.11.7.7.11 Appears in 2 hymnals First Line: When the Son of God was dying, long ago Lyrics: lost and low. Cynics sneered and wagged ... Topics: Biblical Names and Places Peter; Biblical Names and Places Judas; Biblical Names and Places Barrabas; Biblical Names and Places Mary; Suffering of Christ Scripture: Matthew 27:32-61 Used With Tune: GOLGOTHA

Do Not Fear to Hope

Author: Rory Cooney, b. 1952 Appears in 2 hymnals First Line: Look to God when you are sure Lyrics: 3 Look to God when cynics say our planet's ... Topics: Cross; Rites of the Church Penance (Reconciliation); Rites of the Church Order of Christian Funerals: Rite of Committal; Rites of the Church Order of Christian Funerals: Funeral Liturgy; Rites of the Church Order of Christian Funerals: Vigil for the Deceased; Social Concern; Sin; Power of God; Peace; Love of God for Us; Justice; Journey; Hope; Healing; Faith; Evening; The Liturgical Year Easter (Sundays and Weekdays) Scripture: 1 Corinthians 1:27 Used With Tune: [Look to God when you are sure]

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O WALY WALY

Composer: Colin Hand Meter: 8.8.8.8 Appears in 178 hymnals Tune Sources: Somerset folk song collected by Cecil Sharp, 1859-1924 Tune Key: G Major Incipit: 51232 16551 71234 Used With Text: When God Almighty came to earth (God on earth)
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EIN FESTE BURG

Composer: Martin Luther Appears in 378 hymnals Tune Key: C Major Incipit: 11156 71765 1 Used With Text: A Beauty Hides in Everyone
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BENEDICTUS PRIMUS

Composer: Iona Community Meter: 5.10.10.6 Appears in 2 hymnals Tune Key: F Major Used With Text: Happy Is the One

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Happy Is the One

Author: Iona Community Hymnal: Psalms for All Seasons #1F (2012) Meter: 5.10.10.6 First Line: Happy is the one Lyrics: nor sits where the cynics mock. 2 Happy ... Topics: Atheism; Jesus Christ Mind of; Jesus Christ Teacher; Jesus Christ Way, Truth, and Life; Judgment; Mercy; Obedience; Remnant of Isarel; Servants of God; Truth; Wisdom Psalms; Year A, Ordinary Time after Pentecost, October 23-29; Year B, Easter, 7th Sunday; Year B, Ordinary Time after Pentecost, September 18-24; Year C, Ordinary Time after Epiphany, 6th Sunday; Jesus Christ Good Shepherd; God's Love; God's law; Blessing; Church Year All Saints' Day; Commitment; Conflict; Discipleship; Elements of Worship Praise and Adoration; Emmaus Road; Endurance; Evil; God Obedience to; God's Seeing; God's Seeing; God's Will; God's Word; Year C, Ordinary Time after Pentecost; September 4-10 Scripture: Psalm 1 Tune Title: BENEDICTUS PRIMUS
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A Beauty Hides in Everyone

Author: Secretary Michael Hymnal: Secular Hymnal #1 (2014) First Line: A beauty hides in ev'ryone Lyrics: ... liars with their tales In cynics as they doubt In bigots ... Languages: English Tune Title: EIN FESTE BURG

Psalm of My Life

Hymnal: Favorites Number 9 #53 (1981) First Line: Like worthless chaff the wind blows away Lyrics: I sat with scoffing cynics at play, Until my ... Scripture: Psalm 1 Tune Title: [Like worthless chaff the wind blows away]

People

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Authors, composers, editors, etc.

John L. Bell

b. 1949 Person Name: John L. Bell, b. 1949 Author of "When God Almighty came to earth (God on earth)" in Complete Anglican Hymns Old and New John Bell (b. 1949) was born in the Scottish town of Kilmarnock in Ayrshire, intending to be a music teacher when he felt the call to the ministry. But in frustration with his classes, he did volunteer work in a deprived neighborhood in London for a time and also served for two years as an associate pastor at the English Reformed Church in Amsterdam. After graduating he worked for five years as a youth pastor for the Church of Scotland, serving a large region that included about 500 churches. He then took a similar position with the Iona Community, and with his colleague Graham Maule, began to broaden the youth ministry to focus on renewal of the church’s worship. His approach soon turned to composing songs within the identifiable traditions of hymnody that found began to address concerns missing from the current Scottish hymnal: "I discovered that seldom did our hymns represent the plight of poor people to God. There was nothing that dealt with unemployment, nothing that dealt with living in a multicultural society and feeling disenfranchised. There was nothing about child abuse…,that reflected concern for the developing world, nothing that helped see ourselves as brothers and sisters to those who are suffering from poverty or persecution." [from an interview in Reformed Worship (March 1993)] That concern not only led to writing many songs, but increasingly to introducing them internationally in many conferences, while also gathering songs from around the world. He was convener for the fourth edition of the Church of Scotland’s Church Hymnary (2005), a very different collection from the previous 1973 edition. His books, The Singing Thing and The Singing Thing Too, as well as the many collections of songs and worship resources produced by John Bell—some together with other members of the Iona Community’s “Wild Goose Resource Group,” are available in North America from GIA Publications. Emily Brink

Martin Luther

1483 - 1546 Composer of "EIN FESTE BURG" in Secular Hymnal Luther, Martin, born at Eisleben, Nov. 10, 1483; entered the University of Erfurt, 1501 (B.A. 1502, M.A.. 1503); became an Augustinian monk, 1505; ordained priest, 1507; appointed Professor at the University of Wittenberg, 1508, and in 1512 D.D.; published his 95 Theses, 1517; and burnt the Papal Bull which had condemned them, 1520; attended the Diet of Worms, 1521; translated the Bible into German, 1521-34; and died at Eisleben, Feb. 18, 1546. The details of his life and of his work as a reformer are accessible to English readers in a great variety of forms. Luther had a huge influence on German hymnody. i. Hymn Books. 1. Ellich cristlich lider Lobgesang un Psalm. Wittenberg, 1524. [Hamburg Library.] This contains 8 German hymns, of which 4 are by Luther. 2. Eyn Enchiridion oder Handbuchlein. Erfurt, 1524 [Goslar Library], with 25 German hymns, of which 18 are by Luther. 3. Geystliche Gesangk Buchleyn. Wittenberg, 1524 [Munich Library], with 32 German hymns, of which 24 are by Luther. 4. Geistliche Lieder auffs new gebessert. Wittenberg. J. Klug, 1529. No copy of this book is now known, but there was one in 1788 in the possession of G. E. Waldau, pastor at Nürnberg, and from his description it is evident that the first part of the Rostock Gesang-Buch, 1531, is a reprint of it. The Rostock Gesang-Buch, 1531, was reprinted by C. M. Wiechmann-Kadow at Schwerin in 1858. The 1529 evidently contained 50 German hymns, of which 29 (including the Litany) were by Luther. 5. Geistliche Lieder auffs new gebessert. Erfurt. A. Rauscher, 1531 [Helmstädt, now Wolfenbüttel Library], a reprint of No. 4. 6. Geistliche Lieder. Wittenberg. J. Klug, 1535 [Munich Library. Titlepage lost], with 52 German hymns, of which 29 are by Luther. 7. Geistliche Lieder auffs new gebessert. Leipzig. V. Schumann, 1539 [Wernigerode Library], with 68 German hymns, of which 29 are by Luther. 8. Geistliche Lieder. Wittenberg. J. Klug, 1543 [Hamburg Library], with 61 German hymns, of which 35 are by Luther. 9. Geystliche Lieder. Leipzig. V. Babst, 1545 [Gottingen Library]. This contains Luther's finally revised text, but adds no new hymns by himself. In pt. i. are 61 German hymns, in pt. ii. 40, of which 35 in all are by Luther. For these books Luther wrote three prefaces, first published respectively in Nos. 3, 4, 9. A fourth is found in his Christliche Geseng, Lateinisch und Deudsch, zum Begrebnis, Wittenberg, J. Klug, 1542. These four prefaces are reprinted in Wackernagel’s Bibliographie, 1855, pp. 543-583, and in the various editions of Luther's Hymns. Among modern editions of Luther's Geistliche Lieder may be mentioned the following:— Carl von Winterfeld, 1840; Dr. C. E. P. Wackernagel, 1848; Q. C. H. Stip, 1854; Wilhelm Schircks, 1854; Dr. Danneil, 1883; Dr. Karl Gerok, 1883; Dr. A. F. W. Fischer, 1883; A. Frommel, 1883; Karl Goedeke, 1883, &c. In The Hymns of Martin Luther. Set to their original melodies. With an English version. New York, 1883, ed. by Dr. Leonard Woolsey Bacon and Nathan H. Allen, there are the four prefaces, and English versions of all Luther's hymns, principally taken more or less altered, from the versions by A. T. Russell, R. Massie and Miss Winkworth [repub. in London, 1884]. Complete translations of Luther's hymns have been published by Dr. John Anderson, 1846 (2nd ed. 1847), Dr. John Hunt, 1853, Richard Massie, 1854, and Dr. G. Macdonald in the Sunday Magazine, 1867, and his Exotics, 1876. The other versions are given in detail in the notes on the individual hymns. ii. Classified List of Luther's Hymns. Of Luther's hymns no classification can be quite perfect, e.g. No. 3 (see below) takes hardly anything from the Latin, and No. 18 hardly anything from the Psalm. No. 29 is partly based on earlier hymns (see p. 225, i.). No. 30 is partly based on St. Mark i. 9-11, and xvi., 15, 16 (see p. 226, ii.). No. 35 is partly based on St. Luke ii. 10-16. The following arrangement, however, will answer all practical purposes. A. Translations from the Latin. i. From Latin Hymns: 1. Christum wir sollen loben schon. A solis ortus cardine 2. Der du bist drei in Einigkeit. O Lux beata Trinitas. 3. Jesus Christus unser Heiland, Der von. Jesus Christus nostra salus 4. Komm Gott Schopfer, heiliger Geist. Veni Creator Spiritus, Mentes. 5. Nun komm der Beidenheiland. Veni Redemptor gentium 6. Was flirchst du Feind Herodes sehr. A solis ortus cardine ii. From Latin Antiphons, &c.: 7. Herr Gott dich loben wir. Te Deum laudamus. 8. Verleih uns Frieden gnädiglich. Dapacem, Domine 9. Wir glauben all an einen Gott. iii. Partly from the Latin, the translated stanzas being adopted from Pre-Reformation Versions: 10. Komm, heiliger Geist, Herre Gott. 11. Mitten wir im Leben sind. Media vita in morte sumus. B. Hymns revised and enlarged from Pre-Reformation popular hymns. 12. Gelobet seist du Jesus Christ. 13. Gott der Vater wohn uns bei. 14. Gott sei gelobet und gebenedeiet. 15. Nun bitten wir den heiligen Geist. C. Psalm versions. 16. Ach Gott vom Himmel, sieh darein. 17. Aus tiefer Noth schrei ich zu dir. 18. Ein' feste Burg ist unser Gott. 19. Es spricht der Unweisen Mund wohl. 20. Es wollt uns Gott genädig sein. 21. War Gott nicht mit uns diese Zeit. 22. Wohl dem, der in Gotten Furcht steht. D. Paraphrases of other portions of Holy Scripture. 23. Diess sind die heilgen zehn Gebot. 24. Jesaia dem Propheten das geschah. 25. Mensch willt du leben seliglich. 26. Mit Fried und Freud ich fahr dahin. 27. Sie ist mir lieb die werthe Magd. 28. Vater unser im Himmelreich. E. Hymns mainly Original. 29. Christ lag in Todesbanden. 30. Christ unser Herr zum Jordan kam. 31. Ein neues Lied wir heben an. 32. Erhalt uns Herr bei deinem Wort. 33. Jesus Christus unser Heiland, Der den, 34. Nun freut euch lieben Christengemein. 35. Vom Himmel hoch da komm ich her. 36. Vom Himmel kam der Engel Schaar. In addition to these — 37. Fur alien Freuden auf Erden. 38. Kyrie eleison. In the Blätter fur Hymnologie, 1883, Dr. Daniel arranges Luther's hymns according to what he thinks their adaptation to modern German common use as follows:— i. Hymns which ought to be included in every good Evangelical hymn-book: Nos. 7-18, 20, 22, 28, 29, 30, 32, 34, 35, 36, 38. ii. Hymns the reception of which into a hymn-book might be contested: Nos. 2, 3, 4, 19, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 33. iii. Hymns not suited for a hymn-book: Nos. 1, 5, 6, 27, 31, 37. [Rev. James Mearns, M.A.] --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907)

Fred Pratt Green

1903 - 2000 Person Name: F. Pratt Green Author of "God in His Love" in Ecumenical Praise The name of the Rev. F. Pratt Green is one of the best-known of the contemporary school of hymnwriters in the British Isles. His name and writings appear in practically every new hymnal and "hymn supplement" wherever English is spoken and sung. And now they are appearing in American hymnals, poetry magazines, and anthologies. Mr. Green was born in Liverpool, England, in 1903. Ordained in the British Methodist ministry, he has been pastor and district superintendent in Brighton and York, and now served in Norwich. There he continued to write new hymns "that fill the gap between the hymns of the first part of this century and the 'far-out' compositions that have crowded into some churches in the last decade or more." --Seven New Hymns of Hope , 1971. Used by permission.



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