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E. A. Hoffman

1839 - 1929 Person Name: E. A. H. Author of "Helped by a kind hand" in Bells of Victory Elisha Hoffman (1839-1929) after graduating from Union Seminary in Pennsylvania was ordained in 1868. As a minister he was appointed to the circuit in Napoleon, Ohio in 1872. He worked with the Evangelical Association's publishing arm in Cleveland for eleven years. He served in many chapels and churches in Cleveland and in Grafton in the 1880s, among them Bethel Home for Sailors and Seamen, Chestnut Ridge Union Chapel, Grace Congregational Church and Rockport Congregational Church. In his lifetime he wrote more than 2,000 gospel songs including"Leaning on the everlasting arms" (1894). The fifty song books he edited include Pentecostal Hymns No. 1 and The Evergreen, 1873. Mary Louise VanDyke ============ Hoffman, Elisha Albright, author of "Have you been to Jesus for the cleansing power?" (Holiness desired), in I. D. Sankey's Sacred Songs and Solos, 1881, was born in Pennsylvania, May 7, 1839. --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology, Appendix, Part II (1907) ==============

Edmund S. Lorenz

1854 - 1942 Person Name: Rev. E. S. Lorenz Composer of "[A drunken man sat on the curb-stone]" in Bells of Victory Pseudonymns: John D. Cresswell, L. S. Edwards, E. D. Mund, ==================== Lorenz, Edmund Simon. (North Lawrence, Stark County, Ohio, July 13, 1854--July 10, 1942, Dayton, Ohio). Son of Edward Lorenz, a German-born shoemaker who turned preacher, served German immigrants in northwestern Ohio, and was editor of the church paper, Froehliche Botschafter, 1894-1900. Edmund graduated from Toledo High School in 1870, taught German, and was made a school principal at a salary of $20 per week. At age 19, he moved to Dayton to become the music editor for the United Brethren Publishing House. He graduated from Otterbein College (B.A.) in 1880, studied at Union Biblical Seminary, 1878-1881, then went to Yale Divinity School where he graduated (B.D.) in 1883. He then spent a year studying theology in Leipzig, Germany. He was ordained by the Miami [Ohio] Conference of the United Brethren in Christ in 1877. The following year, he married Florence Kumler, with whom he had five children. Upon his return to the United States, he served as pastor of the High Street United Brethren Church in Dayton, 1884-1886, and then as president of Lebanon Valley College, 1887-1889. Ill health led him to resign his presidency. In 1890 he founded the Lorenz Publishing Company of Dayton, to which he devoted the remainder of his life. For their catalog, he wrote hymns, and composed many gospel songs, anthems, and cantatas, occasionally using pseudonyms such as E.D. Mund, Anna Chichester, and G.M. Dodge. He edited three of the Lorenz choir magazines, The Choir Leader, The Choir Herald, and Kirchenchor. Prominent among the many song-books and hymnals which he compiled and edited were those for his church: Hymns for the Sanctuary and Social Worship (1874), Pilgerlieder (1878), Songs of Grace (1879), The Otterbein Hymnal (1890), and The Church Hymnal (1934). For pastors and church musicians, he wrote several books stressing hymnody: Practical Church Music (1909), Church Music (1923), Music in Work and Worship (1925), and The Singing Church (1938). In 1936, Otterbein College awarded him the honorary D.Mus. degree and Lebanon Valley College the honorary LL.D. degree. --Information from granddaughter Ellen Jane Lorenz Porter, DNAH Archives

Anonymous

Person Name: Anon. Author of "Help us to feel for drunken man" in A Collection of Hymns, for the use of the United Brethren in Christ In some hymnals, the editors noted that a hymn's author is unknown to them, and so this artificial "person" entry is used to reflect that fact. Obviously, the hymns attributed to "Author Unknown" "Unknown" or "Anonymous" could have been written by many people over a span of many centuries.

Palmer Hartsough

1844 - 1932 Author of "Tell him little Lou is dead" Palmer Hartsough was educated in Plymouth, Ypsilanti and Kalamazoo, Michigan. In 1893 he became associated with the Fillmore Brothers of Cincinnati, Ohio. He was a teacher of vocal music. He lived in Ontario, Wisconsin. Dianne Shapiro, from "The Singers and Their Songs: sketches of living gospel hymn writers" by Charles Hutchinson Gabriel (Chicago: The Rodeheaver Company, 1916)

Aurelius Clemens Prudentius

348 - 410 Person Name: Prudentius Author of "Hymn for Those Who Fast" in Hymns of Prudentius translated by R. Martin Pope, The Marcus Aurelius Clemens Prudentius, "The Christian Pindar" was born in northern Spain, a magistrate whose religious convictions came late in life. His subsequent sacred poems were literary and personal, not, like those of St. Ambrose, designed for singing. Selections from them soon entered the Mozarabic rite, however, and have since remained exquisite treasures of the Western churches. His Cathemerinon liber, Peristephanon, and Psychomachia were among the most widely read books of the Middle Ages. A concordance to his works was published by the Medieval Academy of America in 1932. There is a considerable literature on his works. --The Hymnal 1940 Companion ============= Prudentius, Aurelius Clemens , with the occasional prefix of Marcus (cf. Migne, vol. lix. p. 593, and Dressel, p. ii. n), is the name of the most prominent and most prolific author of sacred Latin poetry in its earliest days. Of the writer himself we know nothing, or next to nothing, beyond what he has himself told us in a short introduction in verse to his works. From that source we learn that he was a Spaniard, of good family evidently, and that he was born A.D. 348 somewhere in the north of Spain, either at Saragossa, Tarragona, or Calahorra, but at which is left uncertain, by his applying the same expression to all, which if applied only to one would have fixed his place of birth. After receiving a good education befitting his social status he applied himself for some years to practising as a pleader in the local courts of law, until he received promotion to a judgeship in two cities successively:— "Bis legum moderanrine Frenos nobilium reximus urbium Jus civile bonis reddidimus, terruimus reos;" and afterwards to a post of still higher authority: "Tandem militiae gradu Evectum pietas principis extulit." Archbishop Trench considers this last to have been "a high military appointment at court," and such the poet's own words would seem to describe; but it may well be doubted whether a civilian and a lawyer would be eligible for such employment; in which case we may adopt the solution of the difficulty offered in the Prolegomena to our author's works (Migne, vol. lix. p. 601):— "Evectus indeest ad superiorem rnilitia? gradum, nimirum militia? civil is, palatinae, aut praesidialis, non bellicae, castrensis, aut cohortalis; nam ii qui officiis jure consultorum praesidum, rectorum et similium funguntur, vulgo in cod. Theod. militare et ad superiores militias ascendere dicuntur." It was after this lengthened experience at a comparatively early age of positions of trust and power that Prudentius, conscience-smitten on account of the follies and worldliness that had marked his youth and earlier manhood, determined to throw up all his secular employments, and devote the remainder of his life to advancing the interests of Christ's Church by the power of his pen rather than that of his purse and personal position. Accordingly we find that he retired in his 57th year into poverty and private life, and began that remarkable succession of sacred poems upon which his fame now entirely rests. We have no reason however to regard him as another St. Augustine, rescued from the "wretchedness of most unclean living" by this flight from the temptations and engrossing cares of official life into the calm seclusion of a wholly devotional leisure. He had probably rather learnt from sad experience the emptiness and vanity for an immortal soul of the surroundings of even the high places of this world. As he himself expresses it:— "Numquid talia proderunt Carnis post obitum vel bona, vel mala, Cum jam, quicquid id est, quod fueram, mors aboleverit?" and sought, at the cost of all that the world holds dear, those good things which God hath prepared for them that love Him. Beyond the fact of his retirement from the world in this way, and the fruits which it produced in the shape of his voluminous contributions to sacred poetry, we have no further information about our author. To judge from the amount he wrote, his life must have been extended many years after he began his new career, but how long his life was or where he died we are not told. Probably he died circa 413. His works are:— (1) Liber Cathemerinon. "Christian Day, as we may call it" W. S. Lilly, "Chapters in European History," vol. i. p. 208). (2) Liber Peristephanon. "Martyrs' Garlands" (id.). (3) Apotheosis. A work on the Divine Nature, or the Deification of Human Nature in Christ. (4) Hamartigenia. A treatise on the Origin of Sin, directed against the Marcionites. (5) Psychomachia or "The Spiritual Combat"-—an allegorical work. (6) Libri contra Symmachum. A controversial work against the restoration in the Senate House at Rome of the altar of Victory which Gratian had removed. Symmachus had petitioned Valentinian II. for its restoration in 384, but the influence of St. Ambrose had prevailed against him at that time. In 392 the altar was restored, but removed again by Theodosius in 394. After the death of the latter the attempt to restore it was renewed by Arcadius and Honorius, and it was at that time that Prudentius wrote his first book. The second (for there are two) was written in 405. Fague considers that the first may date in 395. (7) The Dittochseon = the double food or double Testament, is a wordy collection of 49 sets of four verses each, on Old and New Testament scenes. Of these different works the most important are the first two, and it is from them that the Liturgical hymns enumerated below have been chiefly compiled. The general character of Prudentius's writings it is not easy fairly to estimate, and to judge by the wholesale laudation he obtains from some of his critics, and the equally unsparing censure of others, his judges have so found it. In venturing upon any opinion upon such a subject, the reader must bear in mind the peculiar position in which the period at which he was writing found the poet. The poetry of classical Rome in all its exact beauty of form had long passed its meridian, and was being replaced by a style which was yet in its infancy, but which burst forth into new life and beauty in the hands of the Mediaeval hymnologists. Prudentius wrote before rhyming Latin verse was thought of, but after attention had ceased to be given to quantities. Under such circumstances it were vain to look for very finished work from him, and such certainly we do not find. But amidst a good deal of what one must confess is tasteless verbiage or clumsy rhetorical ornament-—however varied the metres he employs, numbering some 17—-there are also passages to be found, not unfrequently, of dramatic vigour and noble expression, which may well hold their own with the more musical utterances of a later date. He writes as a man intensely in earnest, and we may gather much from his writings concerning the points of conduct which were deemed the most important in Christian living at a time when a great portion of mankind were still the victims or slaves of a morality which, heathen at the best, was lowered and corrupted the more as the universality of its influence was more and more successfully challenged by the spread of the Gospel of Christ. If, there¬fore, we can scarcely go as far in our author's praise as Barth—-much given to lavish commendation—-who describes him as "Poeta eximius eruditissimus et sanctissimus scriptor; nemo divinius de rebus Christianis unquam scripsit"; or as Bentley—-not given to praise--who calls him the "Horace and Virgil of the Christians," we shall be as loath, considering under what circumstances he wrote, to carp at his style as not being formed on the best ancient models but as confessedly impure; feeling with Archbishop Trench that it is his merit that "whether consciously or unconsciously, he acted on the principle that the new life claimed new forms in which to manifest itself; that he did not shrink from helping forward that great transformation of the Latin language, which it needed to undergo, now that it should be the vehicle of truths which, were all together novel to it." (Sacred Latin Poetry, 1874, p. 121.) The reader will find so exhaustive an account of the various writings of Prudentius in the account given of him and them in Smith and Wace's Dictionary of Christian Biography, and Smith's Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography, that it is only necessary in this work to refer very briefly to them as above. The poems have been constantly reprinted and re-edited, till the editor who produced the best edition we have of them, Albert Dressel (Leipsic, 1860), is able to say that his is the sixty-third. The use made of Prudentius's poems in the ancient Breviaries and Hymnaries was very extensive. In the form of centos stanzas and lines wore compiled and used as hymns; and it is mainly from these centos, and not from the original poems, that the translations into English were made. Daniel, i., Nos. 103-115, gives 13 genuine hymns as having been in use for "Morning," "Christmas," "Epiphany," "Lent," "Easter," "Transfiguration," "Burial," &c, in the older Breviaries. ….Many more which were used in like manner have been translated into English. When to these are added the hymns and those which have not been translated into English, we realise the position and power of Prudentius in the hymnody of the Church. [Rev. Digby S. Wrangham, M.A.] --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907) ============== Prudentius, A. C, p. 915, ii. Two somewhat full versions of Prudentius are: (1) The Cathemerinon and other Poems of Aurelius Prudentius Clemens in English Verse, Lond., Rivington, 1845; and (2) Translations from Prudentius. By Francis St. John Thackeray, M.A.. F.S.A. Lond., Bell & Sons, 1890. --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology, Appendix, Part II (1907)

J. Burns

Author of "Help us to feel for drunken man" in Temperance Hymn Book and Minstrel

Charles Wesley

1707 - 1788 Author of "From Whence These Dire Portents Around?" in The Cyber Hymnal Charles Wesley, M.A. was the great hymn-writer of the Wesley family, perhaps, taking quantity and quality into consideration, the great hymn-writer of all ages. Charles Wesley was the youngest son and 18th child of Samuel and Susanna Wesley, and was born at Epworth Rectory, Dec. 18, 1707. In 1716 he went to Westminster School, being provided with a home and board by his elder brother Samuel, then usher at the school, until 1721, when he was elected King's Scholar, and as such received his board and education free. In 1726 Charles Wesley was elected to a Westminster studentship at Christ Church, Oxford, where he took his degree in 1729, and became a college tutor. In the early part of the same year his religious impressions were much deepened, and he became one of the first band of "Oxford Methodists." In 1735 he went with his brother John to Georgia, as secretary to General Oglethorpe, having before he set out received Deacon's and Priest's Orders on two successive Sundays. His stay in Georgia was very short; he returned to England in 1736, and in 1737 came under the influence of Count Zinzendorf and the Moravians, especially of that remarkable man who had so large a share in moulding John Wesley's career, Peter Bonier, and also of a Mr. Bray, a brazier in Little Britain. On Whitsunday, 1737, he "found rest to his soul," and in 1738 he became curate to his friend, Mr. Stonehouse, Vicar of Islington, but the opposition of the churchwardens was so great that the Vicar consented that he "should preach in his church no more." Henceforth his work was identified with that of his brother John, and he became an indefatigable itinerant and field preacher. On April 8, 1749, he married Miss Sarah Gwynne. His marriage, unlike that of his brother John, was a most happy one; his wife was accustomed to accompany him on his evangelistic journeys, which were as frequent as ever until the year 1756," when he ceased to itinerate, and mainly devoted himself to the care of the Societies in London and Bristol. Bristol was his headquarters until 1771, when he removed with his family to London, and, besides attending to the Societies, devoted himself much, as he had done in his youth, to the spiritual care of prisoners in Newgate. He had long been troubled about the relations of Methodism to the Church of England, and strongly disapproved of his brother John's "ordinations." Wesley-like, he expressed his disapproval in the most outspoken fashion, but, as in the case of Samuel at an earlier period, the differences between the brothers never led to a breach of friendship. He died in London, March 29, 1788, and was buried in Marylebone churchyard. His brother John was deeply grieved because he would not consent to be interred in the burial-ground of the City Road Chapel, where he had prepared a grave for himself, but Charles said, "I have lived, and I die, in the Communion of the Church of England, and I will be buried in the yard of my parish church." Eight clergymen of the Church of England bore his pall. He had a large family, four of whom survived him; three sons, who all became distinguished in the musical world, and one daughter, who inherited some of her father's poetical genius. The widow and orphans were treated with the greatest kindness and generosity by John Wesley. As a hymn-writer Charles Wesley was unique. He is said to have written no less than 6500 hymns, and though, of course, in so vast a number some are of unequal merit, it is perfectly marvellous how many there are which rise to the highest degree of excellence. His feelings on every occasion of importance, whether private or public, found their best expression in a hymn. His own conversion, his own marriage, the earthquake panic, the rumours of an invasion from France, the defeat of Prince Charles Edward at Culloden, the Gordon riots, every Festival of the Christian Church, every doctrine of the Christian Faith, striking scenes in Scripture history, striking scenes which came within his own view, the deaths of friends as they passed away, one by one, before him, all furnished occasions for the exercise of his divine gift. Nor must we forget his hymns for little children, a branch of sacred poetry in which the mantle of Dr. Watts seems to have fallen upon him. It would be simply impossible within our space to enumerate even those of the hymns which have become really classical. The saying that a really good hymn is as rare an appearance as that of a comet is falsified by the work of Charles Wesley; for hymns, which are really good in every respect, flowed from his pen in quick succession, and death alone stopped the course of the perennial stream. It has been the common practice, however for a hundred years or more to ascribe all translations from the German to John Wesley, as he only of the two brothers knew that language; and to assign to Charles Wesley all the original hymns except such as are traceable to John Wesley through his Journals and other works. The list of 482 original hymns by John and Charles Wesley listed in this Dictionary of Hymnology have formed an important part of Methodist hymnody and show the enormous influence of the Wesleys on the English hymnody of the nineteenth century. -- Excerpts from John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907) ================== Charles Wesley, the son of Samuel Wesley, was born at Epworth, Dec. 18, 1707. He was educated at Westminster School and afterwards at Christ Church, Oxford, where he graduated M.A. In 1735, he took Orders and immediately proceeded with his brother John to Georgia, both being employed as missionaries of the S.P.G. He returned to England in 1736. For many years he engaged with his brother in preaching the Gospel. He died March 29, 1788. To Charles Wesley has been justly assigned the appellation of the "Bard of Methodism." His prominence in hymn writing may be judged from the fact that in the "Wesleyan Hymn Book," 623 of the 770 hymns were written by him; and he published more than thirty poetical works, written either by himself alone, or in conjunction with his brother. The number of his separate hymns is at least five thousand. --Annotations of the Hymnal, Charles Hutchins, M.A., 1872.

César Malan

1787 - 1864 Person Name: H. A. César Malan Composer of "ROSEFIELD" in The Psalter Malan, Henri Abraham César. The family of Malan traces its origin to the valleys of Piedmont. A branch of it settled at Mérindol, in Dauphiné, but was driven from France by the persecutions that followed the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes. Pierre Malan, after seeing his sister fall a victim to persecution, left Mérindol (1714), and arrived at Geneva (1722). Henri Abraham César Malan was born at Geneva in 1787. After an education at the College, he went to Marseilles, with the intention of learning business: but, soon after, entered the Academy at Geneva, as a preparation for the ministry, to which he was ordained in 1810. He had been appointed one of the masters at the College in the previous year. The National Church of Geneva was at that time almost Unitarian, and Malan's convictions were in accord with it. But the great movement known as the Réveil, of which the first products were the dissident church of Bourg de Four and at a later date that founded by Malan himself, and which finally imbued the whole Swiss Church with its spirit, was silently preparing itself. The germ of the movement may be traced in the Société des Amis (1810), of which Empeytaz and A. Bost were leaders; and in Malan's independent attainment to the doctrines of the Divinity of the Saviour and the free gifts of salvation through Him (1816). But the human agency, which gave it force, and determined its Calvinistic direction, was the visit of Robert Haldane (in the autumn of 1816), to whom not only these pioneers of the movement, but F. Monod, E. Rieu, Guers, Gonthier, Merle d'Aubigné, and others, always pointed as their spiritual father. Empeytaz and others sought to attain enfranchisement by the establishment of the "petite Eglise of Bourg de Four." Malan wished to reform the national Church from within: and a sermon at Geneva, which brought on him the obloquy of the professors and theologians that composed his audience, and which Haldane characterized as a republication of the Gospel, was his first overt act (Jan. 19, 1817). But the opposing forces were far too strong for him. The Venerable Company excluded him from the pulpits, and achieved his dismissal from his regentship at the College (1818). In 1820 he built a chapel (Chapelle du Temoignage) in his garden, and obtained the licence of the State for it, as a separatist place of worship. In 1823 he was formally deprived of his status as a minister of the national Church. The seven years that succeeded were the palmy days of the little chapel. Strangers, especially from England, mingled with the overflowing Swiss congregation. But (in 1830) a secession to Bourg de Four, and then the foundation of the Oratoire and the Société Evangelique, which in 1849 absorbed the congregation of Bourg de Four under the title of the Église Evangélique, thinned more and more the number of his adherents. His burning zeal for the conversion of souls found a larger outlet in long tours of evangelization, subsidized by religious friends, in his own land and Belgium and France, and also in Scotland and England, where he had friends among many religious bodies, and where he preached to large congregations. The distinguishing characteristic of these tours was his dealing with individuals. On the steamboat or the diligence, in the mountain walk, at the hotel, no opportunity was lost. On one occasion an old,man whom he visited drew from under his pillow a copy of his great hymnbook, Chants de Sion, 1841, and told him how he had prayed to see the author of it before he died. It is as the originator of the modern hymn movement in the French Reformed Church that Malan's fame cannot perish. The spirit of his hymns is perpetuated in the analysis of Christian experience, the never-wearied delineation of the hopes and fears, the joys and sorrows of the believer's soul, which are still the staple of French Protestant hymns. To this was added, in Malan himself, a marked didactic tone, necessitated by the great struggle of the Réveil for Evangelical doctrine; and an emphatic Calvinism, expressing itself with all the despondency of Newton and Cowper, but, in contrast with them, in bright assurance, peace and gladness. French criticism has pronounced his hymns unequal, and full of literary defects; but their unaffected freshness and fervent sincerity are universally allowed. In the Chants de Sion, hymns 20, ”Hosanna! Béni soit"; 165, “Mon coeur joyeux, plein d'espérance"; 199, "Du Rocher de Jacob"; 200, "Agneau de Dieu"; 239, "Trois fois Jehovah," are in every Protestant French hymnbook; and several others are very widely used. Besides his hymns Malan produced numberless tracts and pamphlets on the questions in dispute between the National and Evangelical Churches and the Church of Rome, as well as articles in the Record and in American reviews. He was a man of varied acquirements. His hymns were set to his own melodies. He was an artist, a mechanic: his little workshop had its forge, its carpenter's bench, its printing press. To the end of his life his strong Calvinism, and his dread of mere external union in church government, kept him distinct from all movements of church comprehension, though freely joining in communion with all the sections of Evangelical thought in Geneva and Scotland. At one time there seemed a prospect of his even rejoining the national Church, which had driven him from her. One of his greatest joys was the meeting of the Evangelical Alliance at Geneva (1861). He left no sect; one of his latest orders was the demolition of his decayed chapel, in which he had preached for 43 years. He died at Vandoeuvres, near Geneva, in 1864, leaving a numerous family, one of whom, the Rev. S. C. Malan, D.D., sometime Vicar of Broadwindsor, is well known as a linguist and a theologian of the English Church. To English readers Malan is chiefly known as a hymn-writer through translations of his "Non, ce n'est pas mourir" (q.v.): "It is not death to die", &c. About a dozen of his hymns appear in a translated form in the Friendly Visitor for 1826. [Rev. H. Leigh Bennett, M.A.] -- John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907) ================= http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/César_Malan

D. S. Warner

1842 - 1895 Person Name: Daniel S. Warner Author of "The Hand of God on the Wall" in Timeless Truths Warner, Daniel Sidney. (near Marshallville, Wayne County, Ohio, 1842--1895). Church of God. Reared on an Ohio farm. During the Civil War, he substituted for a brother. Later he taught school. He attended Oberlin College briefly in 1865. By 1867 he was licensed to preach by the Western Ohio Eldership of the Church of God (Winebrennerian). His experience in preaching was gained on circuits in Nebraska and Ohio. In 1874 he was in trouble with the Eldership for preaching entire sanctification. Soon he joined the Indiana Eldership. In 1881 he was in trouble with this Eldership over sectism. Warner was an associate editor of the Herals of Gospel Freedom in 1878. this paper was merged with the Pilgrim about 1881, and the new paper was called the Gospel Trumpet, with Warner as its editor. Warner was forced to move the paper about, seeing for firm financial foundations. The publishing work was at last established in Grand Junction, Michigan, enabling Warner to travel more extensively with a group of evangelists. Warner's time was spent in editing the Trumpet, writing books, tracts, and songs, and making evangelistic tours of the United States. --John W.V. Smith, DNAH Archives =================================== Daniel Sidney Warner, 1842-1895 Born: June 25, 1842, Bris­tol (now Mar­shall­ville), Ohio. Died: De­cem­ber 12, 1895, Grand Junc­tion, Mi­chi­gan, of pneu­mon­ia. Buried: Near Grand Junc­tion, Mi­chi­gan, at the edge of the Church of God camp­ground that was once there. As of 1880, Warner was liv­ing in Rome Ci­ty, In­di­a­na. His works in­clude: Echoes From Glo­ry, with Bar­ney War­ren (Grand Junc­tion, Mi­chi­gan: The Gos­pel Trump­et Pub­lish­ing Com­pa­ny, 1893) Lyrics-- Ah Poor Ali­en Far from the Fold of Love Ah Poor Sin­ner, Think of Cal­va­ry All This World, Its Wealth and Hon­or All Ye People, Come Down to the Judg­ment Be­gun Along a Dark and Gloomy Path Are You of the Holy Rem­nant Are You Rea­dy, Wait­ing for the Lord? Are You Sow­ing Seeds of Kind­ness? Asleep in Je­sus, Oh, How Sweet A Gentle Hand Un­seen by Us A Long Time I Wan­dered Away Beautiful, Peace­ful Zi­on Behold a Form upon the Lone­ly Mount Behold, What Love, What Bound­less Love Bond of Per­fect­ness, The Borne Away in Mind and Spir­it Brighter Days Are Sweet­ly Dawn­ing By Thy Blessed Word Obey­ing Can the Spir­it of a Mor­tal Church of God, Thou Spot­less Vir­gin Church of the Liv­ing God Come, Be­hold the Love of Je­sus Come unto Me, All Ye That La­bor Come, With­in That Upper Cham­ber Dear Friends, We Have Pre­cious Tidings of Old Don’t Re­sist the Ho­ly Spirit Down into the Flow­ing Ri­ver Do You Tr­iumph, O My Bro­ther? Ere Christ Will Reign Within Thy Heart Fair C­ity of the Gos­pel Day Far Down o’er the Ag­es a Prom­ise Di­vine Fill Me with Thy Spir­it From My Soul and All With­in From the Mount of Heav­en­ly Vi­sion God Is Sit­ting in the Aw­ful Val­ley God Is Sweep­ing through the Na­tions God of Mer­cy, God of Love Great Peace Have They That Love Thy Law Hallelujah to Je­sus! Hark, in the Bi­ble a Warn­ing Hear the Tid­ings of a King­dom Hear the Voice of Our Com­mand­er Hear Ye the Moan of a Soul That Is Lost Here We Meet and Part in Je­sus His Yoke Is Ea­sy How Often I’ve Pondered My Struggles Within How Sweet Is My Walk with Je­sus! How Sweet This Bond of Per­fect­ness I Am Rest­ing in Je­sus, Hal­le­lu­jah! I Know My Name Is There I Heard the Dear Re­deem­er Say I Lost My Life for Je­sus on the Cross I Ought to Love My Sav­ior I Seem to Hear an An­gel Choir I Will Be with Thee, O, Child of Love I Will Part with Thee, Old Mas­ter I Will Trust Thee, O My Fa­ther If Thou Wilt Know the Foun­tain Deep I’ll Sing of a Ri­ver Di­vine In the Cham­bers of Thy Bo­som In the Light of God In the Morn­ing of the Lord Is the Spirit Glow­ing in Thy Heart? It Is Writ­ten in the Bi­ble I’ve Found a Friend in Je­sus I’ve Found My Lord and He Is Mine I’ve Reached the Land of Pure De­light Jesus Drank the Cup of Sor­row Jesus Has Taken My Load of Sin Jesus, Thou a Fount­ain Art Last Great Day, The Let Us Sing an In­vi­ta­tion Let Us Sing a Sweet Song of the Home of the Soul Let Us Sing the Name of Je­sus Life Is Not a Mys­tic Dream Light in Our Dark­ness, Bro­ther Lord Our Shep­herd, The Listen, Sin­ner, to the Voice Lord, the Shades of Night Lo, Heav­en Now Opens to Rap­tur­ous View Lo the King­dom of Hea­ven We See Lo, wisdom Crieth in the Streets Mansion Is Wai­ting in Glo­ry, A Men Speak of a Church Tri­umph­ant Mighty Mes­sen­gers Are Run­ning My Je­sus Died for Me up­on the Cross My Name Is in the Book of Life My Soul in Trou­ble Roamed My Soul Is Sa­tis­fied My Soul Is Saved from Sin Not in the Tem­ples Made with Hands Now My Pil­grim toils Are Over Now the Great King of Ba­bel O Blessed Je­sus, for Thee W Are Wait­ing O Blessed Je­sus, Thy Love Is Su­preme O Careless Sin­ner, Wake to Mer­cy’s Call O God, In­spire Our Morn­ing Hymn O How Can Any­one Re­fuse O How Sublime Is the Life of the Christ­ian O Let Us Sing the Mighty Love O Love Di­vine, Un­fa­thomed! O Praise the Lord, My Soul Is Saved O Precious Bi­ble! Burn­ing Words from Hea­ven O Sin­ner, Come Home to the Sav­ior O W Love the Child­ren’s Mee­ting O What Deep and Pure Com­pas­sion O Wor­ship God, the Fa­ther O Ye Pil­grims, Sing an Ex­hor­ta­tion O’er the Door of Hea­ven’s King­dom Oft My Heart Has Bled with Sor­row Oh, Wor­ship God the Fa­ther, Just and True Oh, Come and Praise the Lord To­day Oh, When We Re­mem­ber the Good­ness O Who Can Stand the Judg­ment Day Oh, Why Should I Be Lost Onward Moves the Great Eter­nal Our God Is Love, the An­gels Know Perishing Souls at Stake Tod­ay! Pilgrim of Je­sus, o’er Life’s Trou­bled Sea Praise the Lord with Songs of Glo­ry Rejoice, Little Ones, in the Pro­mise Di­vine River of Peace Salvation Is the Sweet­est Thing See the Great King of Ba­bel Shall I Tell You Why I Ceased from Fol­ly? Shall My Soul As­cend with Rap­ture Shield of Faith, The Since I Have Found My Sa­vior Sing of Salvation, O, it Was Love Sinner, will You Lose Your Soul Sunbeams Spark­ling and Glanc­ing Sweet Fellowship, Thy Crys­tal Tide Sweetly Whis­pered the Lord in My Mind Take the Shield of Faith, My Bro­ther Tell Me, Pil­grim, Traveling Home­ward Tell Me, Watch­man, Oh, What of the Morn­ing There Are Some Rays of Hope Di­vine There Are Tidings of a Land Far Away There Is a Blest Pa­vil­ion There Is a Grace Few Mor­tals Find There Is a Story I Oft­en Must Pon­der There Is Joy in the Ser­vice of the Mas­ter There Was a Bright and Love­ly Boy There’s an An­gel of Mer­cy from Hea­ven There’s a Fact No Mortal Ever Can Deny There’s a Fount­ain of Blood That Atones for the Soul There’s a Land of Ev­er­last­ing Song There’s a Peace­ful Valley of De­ci­sion Found There’s a Song We Love to Sing There’s an Awful Day That’s Com­ing There’s Mercy, Poor Sin­ner, for Thee There’s Mu­sic in My Soul This Is Why I Love My Sav­ior Tho’ All Along My Hap­py Pil­grim Race Time Enough, the Slug­gard Cries Time On­ward Flows Like a R­iver Vast Trusting in Je­sus, My Sa­vior and Friend ’Twas Sung by the Po­ets Two Little Hands Are Sweet­ly Fold­ed Unheeding Win­ter’s Cru­el Blast Un­i­verse Is God’s Do­main, The We Are Com­ing, Hal­le­lu­jah! We Are Going Home to Hea­ven’s Gold­en City We Are the Hap­py Child­ren We Have Met To­day on the Old Camp­ground We Have Reached an Aw­ful Era We Have Read in Sac­red Sto­ry We Stand upon the Sea of Glass We Tread up­on the Aw­ful Verge We Will Work for Je­sus We’ll Fol­low the Lord All the Way We’re a Hap­py Christ­ian Band What Awful Dark­ness Shrouds All the Earth! When Lost in the Dark­ness of Guilt and Despair When We Pass the Gold­en Sum­mer Where Art Thou, Wan­d’ring Sin­ner? Where Shall We Look for Help in Af­flict­ion? While Sleep­ing Care­less on the Brink Whiter Than Snow Who but the Christ­ian Is Hap­py and Free? Who Can Sing the Won­drous Love of the Son Di­vine?? Who Is My Life but Christ Alone? Who Will Suf­fer with the Sav­ior? Why Should a Doubt or Fear Arise? Why Should a Mor­tal Man Com­plain? Wonderful Fount­ain of Glo­ry --hymntime.com/tch

Calvin Seerveld

b. 1930 Versifier of "The Mighty Deeds the LORD Has Done" in Psalter Hymnal (Gray)

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