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Epiphany Carol

Author: Francis Patrick O'Brien, b.1958 Meter: 8.7.8.7 D Appears in 3 hymnals First Line: Ev'ry nation sees the glory Topics: Epiphany of the Lord Used With Tune: HOLY MANNA
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As with gladness men of old

Author: William Chatterton Dix (1837-1898) Meter: 7.7.7.7.7.7 Appears in 549 hymnals Lyrics: 1 As with gladness men of old did the guiding star behold, as with joy they hailed its light, leading onward, beaming bright; so, most gracious Lord, may we evermore be led to thee. 2 As with joyful steps they sped, Saviour, to thy lowly bed, there to bend ... Topics: Church Year Epiphany; Epiphany; Epiphany Scripture: Isaiah 60:19-20 Used With Tune: DIX
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Carol of the Epiphany

Author: John Bell Meter: 8.8.8.8 Appears in 2 hymnals First Line: I sought him dressed in finest clothes Topics: The Grace of Jesus Christ Christ's Birth and Baptism Scripture: Matthew 2:1-12 Used With Tune: FIRST HAND

Tunes

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EPIPHANY

Composer: Joseph Francis Thrupp (1827-1867) Meter: 11.10.11.10 Appears in 34 hymnals Tune Key: D Major Incipit: 32156 71765 32114 Used With Text: Brightest and best of the sons of the morning

EPIPHANY HYMN

Composer: Mendelssohn Meter: 11.10.11.10 Appears in 144 hymnals Tune Key: E Major Incipit: 32154 43217 13222 Used With Text: Brightest and best of the sons of the morning
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EPIPHANY

Composer: Edward J. Hopkins Meter: 11.10.11.10 Appears in 5 hymnals Tune Key: E Flat Major Incipit: 34326 62344 32543 Used With Text: Brightest and best of the sons of the morning

Instances

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Published text-tune combinations (hymns) from specific hymnals
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Brightest and best of the sons of the morning

Author: Reginald Heber (1783-1826) Hymnal: Ancient and Modern #96a (2013) Meter: 11.10.11.10 Lyrics: 1 Brightest and best of the sons of the morning, dawn on our darkness, and lend us thine aid; star of the east, the horizon adorning, guide where our infant Redeemer is laid. 2 Cold on his cradle the dew-drops are shining; low lies his head with the beasts ... Topics: Church Year Epiphany; Epiphany; Epiphany Scripture: Psalm 34:18 Tune Title: EPIPHANY
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Filo plej hela de horo matena

Author: Reginald Heber; Giles Leigh Browne Hymnal: TTT-Himnaro Cigneta #141 (2009) Lyrics: 1. Filo plej hela de horo matena, Al ni aperu ĉe l' ruĝ-horizont'; Stel' orienta, heroldo tag-vena! Gvidu al nia infana Savont'. 2. Sur la lulilo ros-gutoj briladas, Kuŝas la Bebo en stal' de bovar'; Sed la dormanton anĝeloj gardadas, Estron kaj Reĝon de l ... Topics: Epiphany Languages: Esperanto Tune Title: EPIPHANY HYMN

Brightest and best of the sons of the morning

Author: Bishop R. Heber Hymnal: The Book of Common Praise #356b (1939) Meter: 11.10.11.10 Topics: Epiphany Tune Title: EPIPHANY HYMN

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Authors, composers, editors, etc.

Reginald Heber

1783 - 1826 Person Name: Reginald Heber (1783-1826) Author of "Brightest and best of the sons of the morning" in Ancient and Modern Reginald Heber was born in 1783 into a wealthy, educated family. He was a bright youth, translating a Latin classic into English verse by the time he was seven, entering Oxford at 17, and winning two awards for his poetry during his time there. After his graduation he became rector of his father's church in the village of Hodnet near Shrewsbury in the west of England where he remained for 16 years. He was appointed Bishop of Calcutta in 1823 and worked tirelessly for three years until the weather and travel took its toll on his health and he died of a stroke. Most of his 57 hymns, which include "Holy, Holy, Holy," are still in use today. -- Greg Scheer, 1995 ==================== Heber, Reginald, D.D. Born at Malpas, April 21, 1783, educated at Brasenose College, Oxford; Vicar of Hodnet, 1807; Bishop of Calcutta, 1823; died at Trichinopoly, India, April 3, 1826. The gift of versification shewed itself in Heber's childhood; and his Newdigate prize poem Palestine, which was read to Scott at breakfast in his rooms at Brazenose, Oxford, and owed one of its most striking passages to Scott's suggestion, is almost the only prize poem that has won a permanent place in poetical literature. His sixteen years at Hodnet, where he held a halfway position between a parson and a squire, were marked not only by his devoted care of his people, as a parish priest, but by literary work. He was the friend of Milman, Gifford, Southey, and others, in the world of letters, endeared to them by his candour, gentleness, "salient playfulness," as well as learning and culture. He was on the original staff of The Quarterly Review; Bampton Lecturer (1815); and Preacher at Lincoln's Inn (1822). His edition of Jeremy Taylor is still the classic edition. During this portion of his life he had often had a lurking fondness for India, had traced on the map Indian journeys, and had been tempted to wish himself Bishop of Calcutta. When he was forty years old the literary life was closed by his call to the Episcopate. No memory of Indian annals is holier than that of the three years of ceaseless travel, splendid administration, and saintly enthusiasm, of his tenure of the see of Calcutta. He ordained the first Christian native—Christian David. His first visitation ranged through Bengal, Bombay, and Ceylon; and at Delhi and Lucknow he was prostrated with fever. His second visitation took him through the scenes of Schwartz's labours in Madras Presidency to Trichinopoly, where on April 3,1826, he confirmed forty-two persons, and he was deeply moved by the impression of the struggling mission, so much so that “he showed no appearance of bodily exhaus¬tion." On his return from the service ”He retired into his own room, and according to his invariable custom, wrote on the back of the address on Confirmation 'Trichinopoly, April 3, 1826.' This was his last act, for immediately on taking off his clothes, he went into a large cold bath, where he had bathed the two preceding mornings, but which was now the destined agent of his removal to Paradise. Half an hour after, his servant, alarmed at his long absence, entered the room and found him a lifeless corpse." Life, &c, 1830, vol. ii. p. 437. Heber's hymns were all written during the Hodnet period. Even the great missionary hymn, "From Greenland's icy mountains," notwithstanding the Indian allusions ("India's coral strand," "Ceylon's isle"), was written before he received the offer of Calcutta. The touching funeral hymn, "Thou art gone to the grave," was written on the loss of his first babe, which was a deep grief to him. Some of the hymns were published (1811-16) in the Christian Observer, the rest were not published till after his death. They formed part of a ms. collection made for Hodnet (but not published), which contained, besides a few hymns from older and special sources, contributions by Milman. The first idea of the collection appears in a letter in 1809 asking for a copy of the Olney Hymns, which he "admired very much." The plan was to compose hymns connected with the Epistles and Gospels, to be sung after the Nicene Creed. He was the first to publish sermons on the Sunday services (1822), and a writer in The Guardian has pointed out that these efforts of Heber were the germs of the now familiar practice, developed through the Christian Year (perhaps following Ken's Hymns on the Festivals), and by Augustus Hare, of welding together sermon, hymnal, and liturgy. Heber tried to obtain from Archbishop Manners Sutton and the Bishop of London (1820) authorization of his ms. collection of hymns by the Church, enlarging on the "powerful engine" which hymns were among Dissenters, and the irregular use of them in the church, which it was impossible to suppress, and better to regulate. The authorization was not granted. The lyric spirit of Scott and Byron passed into our hymns in Heber's verse; imparting a fuller rhythm to the older measures, as illustrated by "Oh, Saviour, is Thy promise fled," or the martial hymn, "The Son of God goes forth to war;" pressing into sacred service the freer rhythms of contemporary poetry (e.g. "Brightest and best of the sons of the morning"; "God that madest earth and heaven"); and aiming at consistent grace of literary expression.. Their beauties and faults spring from this modern spirit. They have not the scriptural strength of our best early hymns, nor the dogmatic force of the best Latin ones. They are too flowing and florid, and the conditions of hymn composition are not sufficiently understood. But as pure and graceful devotional poetry, always true and reverent, they are an unfailing pleasure. The finest of them is that majestic anthem, founded on the rhythm of the English Bible, "Holy, Holy, Holy, Lord God Almighty." The greatest evidence of Heber's popularity as a hymnwriter, and his refined taste as a compiler, is found in the fact that the total contents of his ms. collection which were given in his posthumous Hymns written and adapted to the Weekly Church Service of the Year. London, J. Murray, 1827; which included 57 hymns by Heber, 12 by Milman, and 29 by other writers, are in common in Great Britain and America at the present time. [Rev. H. Leigh Bennett, M.A.] Of Bishop Heber's hymns, about one half are annotated under their respective first lines. Those given below were published in Heber's posthumous Hymns, &c, 1827. Some of them are in extensive use in Great Britain and America; but as they possess no special histories they are grouped together as from the Hymns, &c, 1827:— 1. Beneath our feet, and o'er our head. Burial. 2. Creator of the rolling flood. St. Peter's Day, or, Gospel for 6th Sunday after Trinity. 3. Lo, the lilies of the field. Teachings of Nature: or, Gospel for 15th Sunday after Trinity. 4. 0 God, by Whom the seed is given. Sexagesima. 6. 0 God, my sins are manifold. Forgiveness, or, Gospel for 22nd S. after Trinity. 6. 0 hand of bounty, largely spread. Water into Wine, or, Gospel for 2nd S. after Epiphany. 7. 0 King of earth, and air, and sea. Feeding the Multitude; or, Gospel for 4th S. in Lent. 8. 0 more than merciful, Whose bounty gave. Good Friday. 9. 0 most merciful! 0 most bountiful. Introit Holy Communion. 10. 0 Thou, Whom neither time nor space. God unsearchable, or, Gospel for 5th Sunday in Lent. 11. 0 weep not o'er thy children's tomb. Innocents Day. 12. Room for the proud! Ye sons of clay. Dives and Lazarus, or, Gospel for 1st Sunday after Trinity. 13. Sit thou on my right hand, my Son, saith the Lord. Ascension. 14. Spirit of truth, on this thy day. Whit-Sunday. 15. The feeble pulse, the gasping breath. Burial, or, Gospel for 1st S. after Trinity. 16. The God of glory walks His round. Septuagesima, or, the Labourers in the Marketplace. 17. The sound of war in earth and air. Wrestling against Principalities and Powers, or, Epistle for 2lst Sunday after Trinity. 18. The world is grown old, her pleasures are past. Advent; or, Epistle for 4th Sunday in Advent. 19. There was joy in heaven. The Lost Sheep; or, Gospel for 3rd S. after Trinity. 20. Though sorrows rise and dangers roll. St. James's Day. 21. To conquer and to save, the Son of God. Christ the Conqueror. 22. Virgin-born, we bow before Thee. The Virgin Mary. Blessed amongst women, or, Gospel for 3rd S. in Lent. 23. Wake not, 0 mother, sounds of lamentation. Raising the Widow's Son, or, Gospel for 16th S. after Trinity. 24. When on her Maker's bosom. Holy Matrimony, or, Gospel for 2nd S. after Epiphany. 25. When through the torn sail the wild tempest is streaming. Stilling the Sea, or, Gospel for 4th Sunday after Epiphany. 26. Who yonder on the desert heath. The Good Samaritan, or, Gospel for 13th Sunday after Trinity. This list is a good index of the subjects treated of in those of Heber's hymns which are given under their first lines, and shows that he used the Gospels far more than the Epistles in his work. --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907)

Felix Mendelssohn-Bartholdy

1809 - 1847 Person Name: Mendelssohn Adapted from of "EPIPHANY HYMN" in The Book of Common Praise Jacob Ludwig Felix Mendelssohn-Bartholdy; b. 1809, Hamburg; d. 1847, Leipzig Evangelical Lutheran Hymnal, 1908

Joseph Francis Thrupp

1827 - 1867 Person Name: Joseph Francis Thrupp (1827-1867) Composer of "EPIPHANY" in Ancient and Modern Thrupp, Joseph. Francis, M.A., son of a solicitor, was born May 20,1827, and educated at Winchester School and Trinity College, Cambridge. At Winchester he gained the Heathcote and Duncan prizes, and the Queen's gold medal for an English poem, and was Head Prefect during his last year. He graduated in 1849 as 7th Wrangler, and 11th in the 1st class of the Classical Tripos. In 1850 he was elected a Fellow of his college. Taking Holy Orders in 1852, he was appointed Vicar of Barrington, Cambridge, in 1852, and Select Preacher before the University in 1865. He was also for some time a member of the Board of Theological Studies, and was associated with the Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge some 20 years. He died at Surbiton, Sept. 24, 1867. His published works include An Introduction to the Study and the Use of the Psalms; A Revised Translation of the Song of Songs; Ancient Jerusalem; and Psalms and Hymns (Cambridge, Macmillan), 1853. This last contains prefaces, indices, with authors’ names, 93 psalms, 236 hymns, 16 doxologies. Of these 28 psalms and 18 hymns are by Mr. Thrupp. The best known of his hymns are, "Awhile in spirit, Lord, to Thee"; "Hail, that head, all torn and wounded"; "O Son of Man, Thyself once crossed." Mr. Thrupp's versions of individual psalms have not come into common use beyond his own collection. They are therein signed with his initials, "J. F.T.," but are not separately annotated in this Dictionary. His hymns are mainly on the special Festivals of the Church, and, in addition to those annotated elsewhere are:— 1. Abide with us, 0 Saviour dear. Evening. 2. Eternal Word! Incarnate Light. Christ our All. 3. Eternal Word! Who ever wast. Annunciation. 4. How beauteous are their peaceful feet. Ordination. 5. Lord of majesty and might. School Festival. 6. Master, the Son of God art Thou. St. Bartholomew. 7. 0 Saviour of our earthly race. St. Luke. 8. 0 Thou, Whom upward to the sky. Ascension. 9. 0, where shall we deliverance seek. Lent. 10. Ope, Salem, ope thy temple gates. The Presentation. 11. Saviour of men, Almighty Lord. St. Mark. 12. Thou Who didst Thy brethren twain. Saints Simon and Jude. 13. Thou Whose voice upon the border. St. Andrew. 14. To David's Son hosannas sing. Palm Sunday. 15. Two and two, Thy servants, Lord. SS. Philip and James. 16. What, though the ground all good at first. Lent. Mr. Thrupp contributed several articles to Smith's Dictionary of the Bible, and was one of the selected writers on the staff of the Speaker's Commentary. -- John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907)

Hymnals

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Published hymn books and other collections

The Book of Common Praise

Publication Date: 1939 Publisher: Oxford University Press Publication Place: Toronto

Small Church Music

Editors: Reginald Heber Description: The SmallChurchMusic site was commenced in 2006 grew out of the requests from those struggling to provide suitable music for their services and meetings. Rev. Clyde McLennan was ordained in mid 1960’s and was a pastor in many small Australian country areas, and therefore was acutely aware of this music problem. Having also been trained as a Pipe Organist, recordings on site (which are a subset of the smallchurchmusic.com site) are all actually played by Clyde, and also include piano and piano with organ versions. All recordings are in MP3 format. Churches all around the world use the recordings, with downloads averaging over 60,000 per month. The recordings normally have an introduction, several verses and a slowdown on the last verse. Users are encouraged to use software: Audacity (http://www.audacityteam.org) or Song Surgeon (http://songsurgeon.com) (see http://scm-audacity.weebly.com for more information) to adjust the MP3 number of verses, tempo and pitch to suit their local needs. Copyright notice: Rev. Clyde McLennan, performer in this collection, has assigned his performer rights in this collection to Hymnary.org. Non-commercial use of these recordings is permitted. For permission to use them for any other purposes, please contact manager@hymnary.org. Home/Music(smallchurchmusic.com) List SongsAlphabetically List Songsby Meter List Songs byTune Name About  

The Methodist Hymn-Book with Tunes

Publication Date: 1933 Publisher: Methodist Conference Office Publication Place: London

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