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Great Is Thy Faithfulness

Author: Thomas O. Chisholm Meter: 11.10.11.10 with refrain Appears in 146 hymnals First Line: Great is thy faithfulness, O God my Father Lyrics: 1 Great is thy faithfulness, O God my Father, ... : Great is thy faithfulness! Great is thy faithfulness! Morning by morning ... hath provided. Great is thy faithfulness, Lord, unto me! 2 ... manifold witness to thy great faithfulness, mercy, and love. (Refrain) ... Topics: Grow Our Walk with God Scripture: Psalm 36:5 Used With Tune: FAITHFULNESS
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My Faith Looks Up to Thee

Author: Ray Palmer Appears in 1,953 hymnals Lyrics: 1 My faith looks up to thee, Thou ... Topics: Faith Used With Tune: [My faith looks up to thee]
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We Walk by Faith

Author: Henry Alford Meter: 8.6.8.6 Appears in 58 hymnals First Line: We walk by faith, and not by sight Lyrics: 1 We walk by faith, and not by sight; with ... , our unbelief, and may our faith abound; to call on you ... That when our life of faith is done in realms of ... sight. 5 We walk by faith, and not by sight; with ... Topics: Grace Prayer, Trust, Hope Scripture: Mark 9:24 Used With Tune: MARTYRDOM

Hymnals

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Published hymn books and other collections
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Lift Up Your Hearts

Publication Date: 2013 Publisher: Faith Alive Christian Resouces Publication Place: Grand Rapids, Mich. Editors: Joyce Borger; Martin Tel; John D. Witvliet
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The Faith We Sing

Publication Date: 2001 Publisher: Abingdon Press Description: The Faith We Sing is a supplement to the 1989 United Methodist Hymnal. Like many recent hymnal supplements, the 284 songs included in the collection explore new hymnic territory: recently written hymn texts, praise & worship, non-western musics, gender neutral texts, etc. The pew edition is slim enough to fit in a pew rack with the UMH, but a number of other editions expand one's options: the singer's edition (for choir and soloists), accompaniment and simplified editions (piano/organ), worship planner edition, guitar edition, and braille, American sign language, and MIDI editions.
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Hymns of Faith

Publication Date: 1980 Publisher: Tabernacle Publishing Company Publication Place: Carol Stream, Ill.

Tunes

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[My faith looks up to thee]

Composer: Lowell Mason Appears in 421 hymnals Tune Key: E Flat Major Incipit: 13554 32244 32326 Used With Text: My Faith Looks Up to Thee
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[Faith of our fathers! living still]

Composer: James G. Walton; Henri F. Hemy Appears in 336 hymnals Tune Key: G Major Incipit: 32117 12671 17651 Used With Text: Faith of Our Fathers

DOWNS

Composer: Lowell Mason, 1792-1872 Appears in 129 hymnals Tune Key: E Flat Major Incipit: 13565 54356 15451 Used With Text: O for a Faith That Will Not Shrink

Instances

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Published text-tune combinations (hymns) from specific hymnals
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My Faith Looks Up to Thee

Author: Ray Palmer Hymnal: Revival Hymns and Choruses #359 (1970) Lyrics: 1 My faith looks up to thee, Thou ... Topics: Faith Languages: English Tune Title: [My faith looks up to thee]
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Faith of Our Fathers

Author: Frederick W. Faber Hymnal: Hymns of Faith #550 (1980) First Line: Faith of our fathers! living still Lyrics: ... glorious Word! Faith of our fathers, holy faith! We will ... for thee! Faith of our fathers, holy faith! We ... thee till death. 3 Faith of our fathers! ... truly free. Faith of our fathers, holy faith! We will ... virtuous life: Faith of our fathers, holy faith! We will ... Topics: Faithfulness of Believer; Faithfulness of Believer Scripture: Hebrews 11:33-35 Tune Title: [Faith of our fathers! living still]

Holy Spirit, Faithful Guide

Author: M. M. W. Hymnal: Triumphant Service Songs #69 (1934) Topics: Holy Spirit; Lord's Supper Tune Title: [Holy Spirit, faithful Guide]

People

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Authors, composers, editors, etc.

Ira David Sankey

1840 - 1908 Person Name: Ira David Sankey, 1840-1908 Composer of "FAITH IS THE VICTORY" in Hymnal of the Church of God Sankey, Ira David, was born in Edinburgh, Pennsylvania, in 1840, of Methodist parents. About 1856 he removed with his parents to Newcastle, Pennsylvania, where he became a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Four years afterwards he became the Superintendent of a large Sunday School in which he commenced his career of singing sacred songs and solos. Mr. Moody met with him and heard him sing at the International Convention of the Young Men's Christian Association, at Indianapolis, and through Mr. Moody's persuasion he joined him in his work at Chicago. After some two or three years' work in Chicago, they sailed for England on June 7, 1872, and held their first meeting at York a short time afterwards, only eight persons being present. Their subsequent work in Great Britain and America is well known. Mr. Sankey's special duty was the singing of sacred songs and solos at religious gatherings, a practice which was in use in America for some time before he adopted it. His volume of Sacred Songs and Solos is a compilation from various sources, mainly American and mostly in use before. Although known as Sankey and Moody’s Songs, only one song, "Home at last, thy labour done" is by Mr. Sankey, and not one is by Mr. Moody. Mr. Sankey supplied several of the melodies. The English edition of the Sacred Songs & Solos has had an enormous sale; and the work as a whole is very popular for Home Mission services. The Songs have been translated into several languages. --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907) Pseudonymns: Harry S. Low­er Rian A. Dykes ==================== Sankey, I. D., p. 994, i. During the past fifteen years Mr. Sankey's Sacred Songs and Solos have had a very large sale, which has justified him in increasing the number of songs and hymns, including " New Hymns and Solos," to 1200. In 1906 he published My Life and Sacred Songs (London : Morgan & Scott). In addition to the "Story of his Own Life," the work contains an account of the most popular of his solos, with interesting reminiscences of the spiritual awakening of many who were influenced through his singing of them in public. In this respect it corresponds in some measure with G. J. Stevenson's Methodist Hymn Book, &c, 1883 (p. 1094, i.). It is an addition to the Sacred Songs and Solos, which will be held in esteem by many. In addition to his hymn, noted on p. 994, ii., Mr. Sankey gives details of the following:— 1. Out of the shadow-land into the sunshine. [Heaven Anticipated.] Mr. Sankey's account of this hymn is:— "I wrote this hymn specially for the memorial service held for Mr. Moody in Carnegie Hall, where 1 also sang it as a solo. It is the last sacred song of which I wrote both the words and music. The idea was suggested by Mr. Moody's last words, 'Earth recedes; heaven opens before me . . . God is calling me, and I must go.' On account of its peculiar association with my fellow-labourer in the Gospel for so many years, the words are here given in full." The hymn follows on p. 185, in 3 stanzas of 4 lines and a chorus. 2. Rejoice! Rejoice! our King is coming, [Advent.] Mr. Sankey writes concerning this hymn:— "During one of my trips to Great Britain on the SS. City of Rome a storm raged on the sea. The wind was howling through the rigging, and waves like mountains of foam were breaking over the bow of the vessel. A great fear had fallen upon the passengers. When the storm was at its worst, we all thought we might soon go to the bottom of the sea. The conviction came to me that the Lord would be with us iu the trying hour, and sitting down in the reading room, I composed this hymn. Before reaching England the tune had formed itself in my mind, and on arriving in London I wrote it out, and had it published in Sacred Songs and Solos, where it is No. 524 in the edition. of 1888. From Mr. Sankey's autobiographical sketch we gather that he was born at Edinburgh, in Western Pennsylvania, Aug. 28, 1840, joined Mr. Moody in 1871, and visited England for the first time in 1873. The original of the Sacred Songs, &c, of 23 pieces only, was offered as a gift to the London publishers of P. Phillips's Hallowed Song, and declined by them. It was subsequently accepted by Mr. K. O. Morgan, of Morgan & Scott, and is now a volume of 1200 hymns. From a return kindly sent us by Messrs. Morgan & Scott, we find that the various issues of the Sacred Songs and Solos were:— In 1873, 24 pp.; 1874, 72 pp. ; 1876, 153 hymns; 1877, 271 hymns; 1881, 441 hymns; 1888, 750 hymns; 1903, 1200 hymns. In addition, The Christian Choir, which is generally associated with the Sacred Songs and Solos, was issued in 1884 with 75 hymns, and in 1896 with 281. The New Hymns & Solos, by the same firm, were published in 1888. --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology, New Supplement (1907)

Johann Heermann

1585 - 1657 Author of "O God, My Faithful God" in Psalter Hymnal (Gray) Heermann, Johann, son of Johannes Heermann, furrier at Baudten, near Wohlau, Silesia, was born at Baudten, Oct. 11, 1585. He was the fifth but only surviving child of his parents, and during a severe illness in his childhood his mother vowed that if he recovered she would educate him for the ministry, even though she had to beg the necessary money. He passed through the schools at Wohlau; at Fraustadt (where he lived in the house of Valerius Herberger, q. v., who took a great interest in him); the St. Elizabeth gymnasium at Breslau; and the gymnasium at Brieg. At Easter, 1609, he accompanied two young noblemen (sons of Baron Wenzel von Rothkirch), to whom he had been tutor at Brieg, to the University of Strassburg; but an affection of the eyes caused him to return to Baudten in 1610. At the recommendation of Baron Wenzel he was appointed diaconus of Koben, a small town on the Oder, not far from Baudten, and entered on his duties on Ascension Day, 1611, and on St. Martin's Day, 1611, was promoted to the pastorate there. After 1623 he suffered much from an affection of the throat, which compelled him to cease preaching in 1634, his place being supplied by assistants. In October, 1638, he retired to Lissa in Posen, and died there on Septuagesima Sunday (Feb. 17), 1647. (Koch, iii. 16-36; Allgemeine Deutsche Biographie, xi. 247-249, &c.) Much of Heermann's manhood was spent amid the distressing scenes of the Thirty Years' War; and by his own ill health and his domestic trials he was trained to write his beautiful hymns of “Cross and Consolation." Between 1629 and 1634, Koben was plundered four times by the Lichtenstein dragoons and the rough hordes under Wallenstein sent into Silesia by the King of Austria in order to bring about the Counter-Reformation and restore the Roman Catholic faith and practice; while in 1616 the town was devastated by fire, and in 1631 by pestilence. In these troublous years Heermann several times lost all his moveables; once he had to keep away from Koben for seventeen weeks; twice he was nearly sabred; and once, while crossing the Oder in a frail boat loaded almost to sinking, he heard the bullets of the pursuing soldiers whistle just over his head. He bore all with courage and patience, and he and his were wonderfully preserved from death and dishonour. He was thus well grounded in the school of affliction, and in his House and Heart Music some of his finest hymns are in the section entitled "Songs of Tears. In the time of the persecution and distress of pious Christians." As a hymnwriter Heermann ranks with the beat of his century, some indeed regarding him as second only to Gerhardt. He had begun writing Latin poems about 1605, and was crowned as a poet at Brieg on Oct. 8, 1608. He marks the transition from the objective standpoint of the hymnwriters of the Reformation period to the more subjective and experimental school that followed him. His hymns are distinguished by depth and tenderness of feeling; by firm faith and confidence in face of trial; by deep love to Christ, and humble submission to the will of God. Many of them became at once popular, passed into the hymnbooks, and still hold their place among the classics of German hymnody. They appeared principally in— (1) Devoti Musica Cordis. Hauss-und Hertz-Musica &c. Leipzig and Breslau, 1630, with 49 hymns (2nd edition 1636, with 64; 3rd edition 1644, with 69). The first section is entitled "Hymns of Penitence and Consolation from the words of the Ancient Fathers of the Church." Seven of these, however, have no mention in their individual titles of the sources from which they are derived; and the remainder are mostly based not on Latin hymns, but on the prose meditations in Martin Moller's Meditationes sanctorum patrum, or on the mediaeval compilations known as the Meditationes and the Manuale of St. Augustine. (2) Sontags-und Fest-Evangelia. Leipzig and Breslau, 1636, being hymns on the Gospels for Sundays and festivals. (3) Poetische Erquickstunden, Nürnberg, 1656; and its Fernere Fortsetzung, also Nürnberg, 1656 [both in Wernigerode], are poems rather than hymns. The hymns of the Hauss-und Hertz-Musica, with a representative selection from Heermann's other poetical works, were edited by C. E. P. Wackernagel, prefaced by a long biographical and critical introduction, and published at Stuttgart, 1855. Six of the most important of Heermann's hymns are annotated under their respective first lines. The other hymns by Heermann which have passed into English are :— I. Hymns in English common use:-- i. 0 Jesu, du mein Bräutigam. Holy Communion. In his Devoti Musica Cordis, Breslau, 1630, p. 78, in 12 stanzas of 4 lines. Thence in Mützell, 1858, No. 34, in Wackernagel's ed. of his Geistliche Lieder, No. 22, and the Unverfälschter Liedersegen, 1851, No. 283. Seems to be founded on Meditation xi. in the mediaeval compilation known as St. Augustine's Manuale. Translated as:— 0 Jesu, Lord, who once for me, a good translation of stanzas i., ii., iv., v., viii., by A. T. Russell, as No. 158 in his Psalms & Hymns, 1851. Other translations are: (l) 0 Jesu! Bridegroom of my Soul," by J. C. Jacobi, 1722, p. 44 (1732, p. 73). (2) "Dear Saviour, who for me hast borne," by Miss Dunn, 1857. ii. Rett, 0 Herr Jesu, rett dein Ehr. In Time of Trouble. A prayer for deliverance and peace for the Church. In his Devoti Musica Cordis, 1630, p. 119, in 5 stanzas of 4 lines, among the "Songs of Tears." Thence in Mützell, 1858, No. 48, in Wackernagel’s ed., No. 36, and the Unverfälschter Liedersegen, 1851, No. 245. Translated as:— Thine honour rescue, righteous Lord, in full, by Dr. M. Loy, in the Ohio Lutheran Hymnal, 1880. iii. Treuer Wächter Israel. In Time of War. 1630, p. 115, in 13 stanzas of 7 lines, among the "Songs of Tears." In Mützell, 1858, No. 47; in Wackernagel's edition, No. 35, and the Unverfälschter Liedersegen, 1851, No. 594. Lauxmann, in Koch, viii. 549, says of it:— "It is a powerful hymn filled with that prevailing prayer that takes heaven by force," and relates of st. vii.,11. v-7, "Eine Mauer um uns bau," that on Jan. 6, 1814, the Allied Forces were about to enter Schleswig. A poor widow with her daughter and grandson lived in a little house near the entrance of the town. The grandson was reading in his hymnbook those in time of war, and when he came to this said, “It would be a good thing, grandmother, if our Lord God would build a wall around us." Next day all through the town cries of distress were heard, but all was still before their door. On the following morning they had courage to open the door, and lo a snowdrift concealed them from the view of the enemy. On this incident Clemens Brentano composed a beautiful poem "Draus vor Schleswig." It is translated as:— Jesu! as a Saviour, aid. A good tr. of st; vii., viii., xiii., by A. T. Russell, as No. 138 in his Psalms & Hymns, 1851. iv. Zionklagt mit Angst und Schmerzen. Church of Christ. First published in his Devoti Musica Cordis, 2nd ed., 1636 (1644, p. 196), in 6 stanzas of 8 lines, entitled, "From the beautiful golden saying of Isaiah, Chapter xlix." In Mützell, 1858, No. 101, in Wackernagel’s ed., No. 53, and the Unverfälschter Liedersegen, 1851, No. 256. Translated as:— Sion bow'd with anguish weepeth A good translation of stanzas i., iii., v., by A. T. Russell, as No. 141 in his Psalms & Hymns, 1851. Another translation is: "Zion mourns in fear and anguish," by Miss Winkworth, 1869, p. 198. II. Hymns not in English common use:-- v. Ach Jesu! dessen Treu. Love to Christ. 1630, p. 144, in 33 stanzas. One of his finest hymns, full of deep love to Christ, but from its great length very little used in Germany. Translated as, "Ah! Jesus! Lord! whose faithfulness," by Miss Burlingham, in the British Herald, May, 1867, p. 72. vi. Der Tod klopft bei mir an. For the Dying. 1656, p. 22, in 121. Translated as, "That Death is at my door," by Miss Winkworth, 1869, p. 201. vii. Du weinest für Jerusalem. Christ weeping over Jerusalem. 1630, p. 81, in 6 stanzas, entitled, "On the Tears of Christ." Founded on St. Luke xix. 41-44, part of the Gospel for the 10 Sundays after Trinity. The translations are: (1) "With tears o'er lost Jerusalem," by Miss Cox, 1841, p. 159. (2) "Our Lord wept o'er Jerusalem," by Dr. H. Mills, 1845 (1856, p. 295). (3) "Thou weepest o'er Jerusalem," by Miss Winkworth, 1855,p. 70. viii. Herr Jesu Christe mein getreuer Hirte. Holy Communion. 1630, p. 74, in 9 stanzas, founded on M. Moller's Meditationes sanctorum patrum, pt. i. c. 11, and pt. v. c. 2. The translations are: (1) "Dear Saviour, Thou my faithful Shepherd, come” by Miss Dunn, 1857, p. 111. (2) "Lord Jesus Christ, my faithful Shepherd, hear," by Miss Winkworth, 1858, p. 93, repeated in Lyra Eucharistica, 1863-64. ix. Herr unser Gott, lass nicht zu Schanden werden. Christ's Church. 1630, p. 114, as one of the "Songs of Tears," in 5 stanzas. Translated as, "Ah! Lord our God, let them not be confounded," by Miss Winkworth, 1869, p. 197. x. Hilf mir, mein Oott, hilf dass nach dir. Christian Conduct. 1630, p. 32, in 7 stanzas, entitled, "For a better life. From the words of Augustine." Founded on No. i. of the Meditationes current under the name of St. Augustine. This meditation is apparently by St. Anselm of Canterbury. Translated as, "Lord, raise in me a constant Flame," by J. C. Jacobi, 1725, p. 27 (1732, p. 105). xi. Jesu, der du tausend Schmerzen. In Sickness. 1656, in the Fernere Fortsetzung, p. 79, in 12 lines, entitled, "In great bodily pain." Translated as, “Jesu, who didst stoop to prove," by Miss Winkworth, 1869, p. 200. xii. Jesu Tilger meiner Sünden. Lent. 1656, in the Fernere Fortsetzung, p. 1, in 10 lines, entitled, "For Victory in Temptation." Translated as, "Jesu, Victor over sin," by Miss Winkworth, 1869, p. 201. xiii. 0 Jesu, Jesu, Gottes Sohn. Love to Christ, 1630, p. 83, in 7 stanzas, entitled, “Of the Love, which a Christian heart bears to Christ, and will still bear." A beautiful expansion of his motto "Mihi omnia Jesus." The translations are: (1) "What causes me to mourn is this," a translation of stanza ii. by P. H. Molther, as No. 371, in the Moravian Hymn Book, 1789 (1886, No. 461). (2) "O Jesus, Jesus, Son of God," by Miss Burlingham, in the British Herald, Oct. 1865, p. 153, and in Reid's Praise Book, 1872. xiv. Treuer Gott ich muss dir klagen. In Trouble. 1630, p. 103, in 12 stanzas, entitled, "Hymn of a sorrowful heart for increase of faith." Translated as, "Faithful God! I lay before Thee," by J. C. Jacobi, 1720, p. 9(1722, p. 70; 1732, p. 117), and as No. 538 in pt. i. of the Moravian Hymn Book, 1754. xv. Wollt ihr euch nicht, o ihr frommen Christen. Second Advent. 1636, p. 210, in 9 stanzas, entitled, "On the day of the Holy Bishop Nicolaus. Gospel of Luke, 12 Chapter." Translated as: (l) "0 dear Christians, as 'tis needful, wou'd ye," as No. 153 in pt. i. of the Moravian Hymn Book, 1754. (2) “Help us, 0 Christ, to watch and pray," a tr. of st. ix. as st. iii. of No. 868 in the Moravian Hymn Book, 1789 (1849, No. 1221). xvi. Wo soll ich fliehen hin. Lent. 1630, p. 20, in 11 stanzas, entitled, "A hymn of consolation in which a troubled heart lays all its sins in true faith upon Christ. From Tauler." Based on M. Moller's Meditationes, vol. i. pt. i., No. 10. Translated as, "0 whither shall I fly," as No. 447 in pt. i. of the Moravian Hymn Book, 1754. In 1886, No. 279, it begins with "0 Jesus, source of Grace" (stanza ii.). [Rev. James Mearns, M.A.] --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907)

Johann Sebastian Bach

1685 - 1750 Person Name: Johann S. Bach, 1685-1750 Harmonizer of "DARMSTADT" in Psalter Hymnal (Gray) Johann Sebastian Bach was born at Eisenach into a musical family and in a town steeped in Reformation history, he received early musical training from his father and older brother, and elementary education in the classical school Luther had earlier attended. Throughout his life he made extraordinary efforts to learn from other musicians. At 15 he walked to Lüneburg to work as a chorister and study at the convent school of St. Michael. From there he walked 30 miles to Hamburg to hear Johann Reinken, and 60 miles to Celle to become familiar with French composition and performance traditions. Once he obtained a month's leave from his job to hear Buxtehude, but stayed nearly four months. He arranged compositions from Vivaldi and other Italian masters. His own compositions spanned almost every musical form then known (Opera was the notable exception). In his own time, Bach was highly regarded as organist and teacher, his compositions being circulated as models of contrapuntal technique. Four of his children achieved careers as composers; Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven, Mendelssohn, Schumann, Brahms, and Chopin are only a few of the best known of the musicians that confessed a major debt to Bach's work in their own musical development. Mendelssohn began re-introducing Bach's music into the concert repertoire, where it has come to attract admiration and even veneration for its own sake. After 20 years of successful work in several posts, Bach became cantor of the Thomas-schule in Leipzig, and remained there for the remaining 27 years of his life, concentrating on church music for the Lutheran service: over 200 cantatas, four passion settings, a Mass, and hundreds of chorale settings, harmonizations, preludes, and arrangements. He edited the tunes for Schemelli's Musicalisches Gesangbuch, contributing 16 original tunes. His choral harmonizations remain a staple for studies of composition and harmony. Additional melodies from his works have been adapted as hymn tunes. --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907)

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