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Forgive Our Sins As We Forgive

Author: Rosamond E. Herklots, 1905-1987 Meter: 8.6.8.6 Appears in 54 hymnals First Line: "Forgive our sins as we forgive," Lyrics: "Forgive our sins as we ... Topics: Forgiveness; Forgiveness Scripture: Matthew 6:9-13 Used With Tune: DOVE OF PEACE
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Forgiveness

Author: Herbert Knowles Appears in 7 hymnals First Line: Forgive thy foes, nor that alone

God, How Can We Forgive

Author: Ruth Duck Meter: 6.6.8.4 D Appears in 4 hymnals Lyrics: God, how can we forgive when bonds of ... Topics: Grace Social Holiness Scripture: Matthew 6:12-15 Used With Tune: LEONI

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[In You, I find forgiveness]

Composer: Roy Salmond; Mike Mulder; Helen Gierke Appears in 1 hymnal Tune Key: C Major Incipit: 33456 53345 67317 Used With Text: You Are My Wholeness
Text

[Lord, forgive the wrongs I have done]

Composer: JRC Appears in 2 hymnals Tune Key: D Major Incipit: 65645 Used With Text: Lord, forgive the wrong I have done

[Blessed be God, who forgives all our sins]

Composer: Anne Krentz Organ, b. 1960 Appears in 1 hymnal Tune Key: G Major Used With Text: Blessed Be God, Who Forgives

Instances

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Published text-tune combinations (hymns) from specific hymnals

You Are My Wholeness

Author: Roy Salmond; Mike Mulder Hymnal: Hymns for a Pilgrim People #341 (2007) First Line: In You, I find forgiveness Refrain First Line: You, You are my wholeness Lyrics: 1 In You, I find forgiveness, yes, in You ... Topics: Forgiveness Scripture: Hebrews 12:2 Languages: English Tune Title: [In You, I find forgiveness]

There is forgiveness, God doth say

Hymnal: Hymns of Truth and Praise #257 (1971) Tune Title: [There is forgiveness, God doth say]
Text

Lord, forgive the wrong I have done

Hymnal: Worship (3rd ed.) #897 (1986) Lyrics: Lord, forgive the wrong I have done. Topics: Eleventh Sunday in Ordinary Time C Scripture: Psalm 32 Languages: English Tune Title: [Lord, forgive the wrongs I have done]

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Isaac Watts

1674 - 1748 Author of "Show Pity, Lord; O Lord Forgive" in The Baptist Standard Hymnal with Responsive Readings Isaac Watts was the son of a schoolmaster, and was born in Southampton, July 17, 1674. He is said to have shown remarkable precocity in childhood, beginning the study of Latin, in his fourth year, and writing respectable verses at the age of seven. At the age of sixteen, he went to London to study in the Academy of the Rev. Thomas Rowe, an Independent minister. In 1698, he became assistant minister of the Independent Church, Berry St., London. In 1702, he became pastor. In 1712, he accepted an invitation to visit Sir Thomas Abney, at his residence of Abney Park, and at Sir Thomas' pressing request, made it his home for the remainder of his life. It was a residence most favourable for his health, and for the prosecution of his literary labours. He did not retire from ministerial duties, but preached as often as his delicate health would permit. The number of Watts' publications is very large. His collected works, first published in 1720, embrace sermons, treatises, poems and hymns. His "Horae Lyricae" was published in December, 1705. His "Hymns" appeared in July, 1707. The first hymn he is said to have composed for religious worship, is "Behold the glories of the Lamb," written at the age of twenty. It is as a writer of psalms and hymns that he is everywhere known. Some of his hymns were written to be sung after his sermons, giving expression to the meaning of the text upon which he had preached. Montgomery calls Watts "the greatest name among hymn-writers," and the honour can hardly be disputed. His published hymns number more than eight hundred. Watts died November 25, 1748, and was buried at Bunhill Fields. A monumental statue was erected in Southampton, his native place, and there is also a monument to his memory in the South Choir of Westminster Abbey. "Happy," says the great contemporary champion of Anglican orthodoxy, "will be that reader whose mind is disposed, by his verses or his prose, to imitate him in all but his non-conformity, to copy his benevolence to men, and his reverence to God." ("Memorials of Westminster Abbey," p. 325.) --Annotations of the Hymnal, Charles Hutchins, M.A., 1872. ================================= Watts, Isaac, D.D. The father of Dr. Watts was a respected Nonconformist, and at the birth of the child, and during its infancy, twice suffered imprisonment for his religious convictions. In his later years he kept a flourishing boarding school at Southampton. Isaac, the eldest of his nine children, was born in that town July 17, 1674. His taste for verse showed itself in early childhood. He was taught Greek, Latin, and Hebrew by Mr. Pinhorn, rector of All Saints, and headmaster of the Grammar School, in Southampton. The splendid promise of the boy induced a physician of the town and other friends to offer him an education at one of the Universities for eventual ordination in the Church of England: but this he refused; and entered a Nonconformist Academy at Stoke Newington in 1690, under the care of Mr. Thomas Rowe, the pastor of the Independent congregation at Girdlers' Hall. Of this congregation he became a member in 1693. Leaving the Academy at the age of twenty, he spent two years at home; and it was then that the bulk of the Hymns and Spiritual Songs (published 1707-9) were written, and sung from manuscripts in the Southampton Chapel. The hymn "Behold the glories of the Lamb" is said to have been the first he composed, and written as an attempt to raise the standard of praise. In answer to requests, others succeeded. The hymn "There is a land of pure delight" is said to have been suggested by the view across Southampton Water. The next six years of Watts's life were again spent at Stoke Newington, in the post of tutor to the son of an eminent Puritan, Sir John Hartopp; and to the intense study of these years must be traced the accumulation of the theological and philosophical materials which he published subsequently, and also the life-long enfeeblement of his constitution. Watts preached his first sermon when he was twenty-four years old. In the next three years he preached frequently; and in 1702 was ordained pastor of the eminent Independent congregation in Mark Lane, over which Caryl and Dr. John Owen had presided, and which numbered Mrs. Bendish, Cromwell's granddaughter, Charles Fleetwood, Charles Desborough, Sir John Hartopp, Lady Haversham, and other distinguished Independents among its members. In this year he removed to the house of Mr. Hollis in the Minories. His health began to fail in the following year, and Mr. Samuel Price was appointed as his assistant in the ministry. In 1712 a fever shattered his constitution, and Mr. Price was then appointed co-pastor of the congregation which had in the meantime removed to a new chapel in Bury Street. It was at this period that he became the guest of Sir Thomas Abney, under whose roof, and after his death (1722) that of his widow, he remained for the rest of his suffering life; residing for the longer portion of these thirty-six years principally at the beautiful country seat of Theobalds in Herts, and for the last thirteen years at Stoke Newington. His degree of D.D. was bestowed on him in 1728, unsolicited, by the University of Edinburgh. His infirmities increased on him up to the peaceful close of his sufferings, Nov. 25, 1748. He was buried in the Puritan restingplace at Bunhill Fields, but a monument was erected to him in Westminster Abbey. His learning and piety, gentleness and largeness of heart have earned him the title of the Melanchthon of his day. Among his friends, churchmen like Bishop Gibson are ranked with Nonconformists such as Doddridge. His theological as well as philosophical fame was considerable. His Speculations on the Human Nature of the Logos, as a contribution to the great controversy on the Holy Trinity, brought on him a charge of Arian opinions. His work on The Improvement of the Mind, published in 1741, is eulogised by Johnson. His Logic was still a valued textbook at Oxford within living memory. The World to Come, published in 1745, was once a favourite devotional work, parts of it being translated into several languages. His Catechisms, Scripture History (1732), as well as The Divine and Moral Songs (1715), were the most popular text-books for religious education fifty years ago. The Hymns and Spiritual Songs were published in 1707-9, though written earlier. The Horae Lyricae, which contains hymns interspersed among the poems, appeared in 1706-9. Some hymns were also appended at the close of the several Sermons preached in London, published in 1721-24. The Psalms were published in 1719. The earliest life of Watts is that by his friend Dr. Gibbons. Johnson has included him in his Lives of the Poets; and Southey has echoed Johnson's warm eulogy. The most interesting modern life is Isaac Watts: his Life and Writings, by E. Paxton Hood. [Rev. H. Leigh Bennett, M.A.] A large mass of Dr. Watts's hymns and paraphrases of the Psalms have no personal history beyond the date of their publication. These we have grouped together here and shall preface the list with the books from which they are taken. (l) Horae Lyricae. Poems chiefly of the Lyric kind. In Three Books Sacred: i.To Devotion and Piety; ii. To Virtue, Honour, and Friendship; iii. To the Memory of the Dead. By I. Watts, 1706. Second edition, 1709. (2) Hymns and Spiritual Songs. In Three Books: i. Collected from the Scriptures; ii. Composed on Divine Subjects; iii. Prepared for the Lord's Supper. By I. Watts, 1707. This contained in Bk i. 78 hymns; Bk. ii. 110; Bk. iii. 22, and 12 doxologies. In the 2nd edition published in 1709, Bk. i. was increased to 150; Bk. ii. to 170; Bk. iii. to 25 and 15 doxologies. (3) Divine and Moral Songs for the Use of Children. By I. Watts, London, 1715. (4) The Psalms of David Imitated in the Language of the New Testament, And apply'd to the Christian State and Worship. By I. Watts. London: Printed by J. Clark, at the Bible and Crown in the Poultry, &c, 1719. (5) Sermons with hymns appended thereto, vol. i., 1721; ii., 1723; iii. 1727. In the 5th ed. of the Sermons the three volumes, in duodecimo, were reduced to two, in octavo. (6) Reliquiae Juveniles: Miscellaneous Thoughts in Prose and Verse, on Natural, Moral, and Divine Subjects; Written chiefly in Younger Years. By I. Watts, D.D., London, 1734. (7) Remnants of Time. London, 1736. 454 Hymns and Versions of the Psalms, in addition to the centos are all in common use at the present time. --Excerpts from John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907) ================================== Watts, I. , p. 1241, ii. Nearly 100 hymns, additional to those already annotated, are given in some minor hymn-books. --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology, Appendix, Part II (1907) ================= Watts, I. , p. 1236, i. At the time of the publication of this Dictionary in 1892, every copy of the 1707 edition of Watts's Hymns and Spiritual Songs was supposed to have perished, and all notes thereon were based upon references which were found in magazines and old collections of hymns and versions of the Psalms. Recently three copies have been recovered, and by a careful examination of one of these we have been able to give some of the results in the revision of pp. 1-1597, and the rest we now subjoin. i. Hymns in the 1709 ed. of Hymns and Spiritual Songs which previously appeared in the 1707 edition of the same book, but are not so noted in the 1st ed. of this Dictionary:— On pp. 1237, L-1239, ii., Nos. 18, 33, 42, 43, 47, 48, 60, 56, 58, 59, 63, 75, 82, 83, 84, 85, 93, 96, 99, 102, 104, 105, 113, 115, 116, 123, 124, 134, 137, 139, 146, 147, 148, 149, 162, 166, 174, 180, 181, 182, 188, 190, 192, 193, 194, 195, 197, 200, 202. ii. Versions of the Psalms in his Psalms of David, 1719, which previously appeared in his Hymns and Spiritual Songs, 1707:— On pp. 1239, U.-1241, i., Nos. 241, 288, 304, 313, 314, 317, 410, 441. iii. Additional not noted in the revision:— 1. My soul, how lovely is the place; p. 1240, ii. 332. This version of Ps. lxiv. first appeared in the 1707 edition of Hymns & Spiritual Songs, as "Ye saints, how lovely is the place." 2. Shine, mighty God, on Britain shine; p. 1055, ii. In the 1707 edition of Hymns & Spiritual Songs, Bk. i., No. 35, and again in his Psalms of David, 1719. 3. Sing to the Lord with [cheerful] joyful voice, p. 1059, ii. This version of Ps. c. is No. 43 in the Hymns & Spiritual Songs, 1707, Bk. i., from which it passed into the Ps. of David, 1719. A careful collation of the earliest editions of Watts's Horae Lyricae shows that Nos. 1, 7, 9, 10, 11, 12, 14, 16, p. 1237, i., are in the 1706 ed., and that the rest were added in 1709. Of the remaining hymns, Nos. 91 appeared in his Sermons, vol. ii., 1723, and No. 196 in Sermons, vol. i., 1721. No. 199 was added after Watts's death. It must be noted also that the original title of what is usually known as Divine and Moral Songs was Divine Songs only. --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology, New Supplement (1907) =========== See also in: Hymn Writers of the Church

Communauté de Taizé

Person Name: Taizé Community Author of "God Is Forgiviness" in Gather (3rd ed.) The Taizé Community is a community ecumenical based in Taize in France. Founded in 1940 by Brother Roger, it brings together a hundred brothers from around the world and have chosen to live together a life of prayer and celibacy in simplicity. The unity of Christian denominations and care for young adults are among the commitments of the Community since its inception. The Taizé Community was founded in Taizé in 1940 by Brother Roger Schutz, with the goal of "building a life together in which the gospel of reconciliation would be a concretely lived reality" . During the war he helps people in difficulty and hosts German refugees. In 1942, the Gestapo threatened to arrest brother Roger, who fled to Switzerland until the end of the war. After liberation, he returned to where the Taizé brothers join different churches. The ecumenical monastic community and lives by his labor and his newspaper writing. It hosts thousands of young people each year who come to pray and meditate. Brother Roger said of himself: "I found my Christian identity by reconciling within myself the faith of my origins with the mystery of evangelical Catholic faith." Over the years develops the Taizé Community. Companions join brother Roger: community consists currently when brothers coming from around thirty nations and various Christian origins (70 to Taize and some thirty others in other small communities). The community accepts for itself in no gift. The brothers earn their living by their work: they make pottery, jewelery (Taizé Cross pendant), stained glass they sell in a shop located in the community. Their personal inheritances are offered to the poor. By rule, they are committed for life, and have taken a vow of obedience to the prior of the community. The Taizé songs are sung by the worshiping community, with times and translations in various languages. The celebrations include long moments of silence for meditation. Thousands of young people everywhere and all sorts of religious denominations visit Taizé several decades. Taizé offers them hospitality and they can integrate with focus groups, Bible study and prayer together. The Church of Reconciliation was built in 1962 at the initiative of a German organization wishing to make a symbolic gesture of Franco-German reconciliation. In 2005, the death of Brother Roger, Brother Alois, Brother Roger designated his lifetime (according to the rule of the community), succeeded him as prior. In the late sixties and especially after the movements of May 1968, many young people come to Taizé. At Easter, from 1970, until they are 40 000 to gather around the community. One begins to enlarge the church at Taizé by capitals. The French are there many especially during the Thanksgiving holiday, the rest of the year the brothers are young people around the world. Everyone is invited to participate in the Youth Council, in the "dynamics of provisional." This council was not established, but relayed to churches for religious structures open to these new aspirations Life in Taizé is punctuated by prayers. The form of these prayers is particularly suited to young . The brothers and the young people are sitting on the carpet in the Church of Reconciliation. This modular building has sliding walls to accommodate the number of participants. Songs of Taizé, a passage from the gospel, a time of silence, meditations, prayers are linked for 40 to 50 minutes. Biblical introductions are prepared by brothers and follow a path over a full week. This may be a tour of a gospel full taking various passages, or on a specific theme of the Bible. The brother has an explanation of the text by making it as accessible as possible to young people. Given the international population, the brothers usually speak English and organize translations for those less familiar language. After an explanation from 30 to 60 minutes, the brother of organizing small groups (between 5 and 15 people) for young people to share and exchange their understanding of the text and how they live it everyday. Groups are organized for young people of different nationalities, languages ​​or religious denomination meet. The exchanges are in English but often solutions are always found to allow all to participate. Hubs are trading time on a specific theme: about society, matter of faith or meeting a crop. They are often presented by people who are experts in the field. The work is distributed according to the needs of the week with the arrival of young people. These are work groups that allow once again bring together youth from different countries. But it is also essential for the functioning of the reception of all young people. Dishwasher, garbage, organization of the meal, cleaning ... are spots of interest as well as sharing time. Depending on the number of young people present, participants are housed in barracks for 6 and 12 persons, or in tents. Meals are delivered by volunteers to young people arranged in rows to allow for rapid distribution. Advise the brothers to stay from Sunday to next Sunday, which can live a full week to meet God and others. Therefore, Sunday is a special day that is completely oriented welcoming newcomers, especially in the summer months where you have to accommodate between 1,000 and 4,000 youth in the day. Long before the fall of the Berlin Wall, the Taizé brothers went quietly in the countries of Eastern Europe meet young people, where the primary contact with Taizé Eastern Europe. Since 1978, Taizé organized for New Year meetings of five days in a European city as the Pilgrimage of Trust on Earth. Tens of thousands of young people attend and are hosted in the homes or community centers. The pilgrimage is structured on the life of Taizé. The community also hosts yearly international meetings on a smaller scale. These are meetings that particularly affect young people of the continent where the meeting. They are often organized in countries experiencing economic difficulties or political. Such gatherings are a time to support local churches. The presence of young people from other continents, even in small numbers, therefore, shows the support of young people worldwide. --www.wikipedia.org

David Hurd

b. 1950 Person Name: David Hurd, b. 1950 Arranger of "[Bless the Lord who forgives all our sins]" in Hymnal 1982 David Hurd (born 1950) is a composer, concert organist, choral director and educator. He is a Professor of Sacred Music and Director of Chapel Music at the General Theological Seminary, Chelsea, New York City. He is also the Music Director at the Church of the Holy Apostles, also in Chelsea. Dr. Hurd attended the High School of Music and Art, the Juilliard School and Oberlin College. He holds honorary doctorates from Berkeley Divinity School at Yale, Seabury-Western Theological Seminary, and Church Divinity School of the Pacific, given in recognition of his contributions to Sacred Music. In 1977 he received first prizes in both Organ Performance and in Organ Improvisation from the International Congress of Organists, being the only person to ever win both prizes in the same year. Dr. Hurd has held several church staff positions including Assistant Organist, Trinity Church, and Director of Music at both the Church of the Intercession and All Saints' Church, both in Manhattan. His mass setting Intercession Mass is used by many congregations across the United States. With over 100 choral and organ works in print, his compositions have appeared in numerous recordings in both the United States and England. Dr. Hurd is regularly sought out by congregations and organizations seeking to commission new anthems and organ works. Significant premieres have included: "Gloria, gloria," for 4-part choir and instrumental accompaniment, commissioned by the Boy's Choir of Harlem, and premiered at Avery Fisher Hall; "O the Depth of Love Divine," for 4-part choir, brass and organ, commissioned by The Rt. Rev. Neil Alexander, Bishop of Atlanta, and premiered at his consecration; and "Arioso & Final" for organ, commissioned by the Queens Chapter of the American Guild of Organists. The most recent major work is "Sonata for Saxophone and Organ," commissioned by the Hall-Powers Duo, and premiered in Ljubljana, Slovenia at the International Saxophone Congress in 2006. Dr. Hurd's sacred compositions can be found in many hymnals, including the Episcopal Hymnal, 1982. David Hurd is also one of the world's most visible and successful Classical Organists who is African-American. --en.wikipedia.org/

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