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To God Be the Glory

Author: Fanny J. Crosby Appears in 178 hymnals First Line: To God be the glory-great things He hath done! Refrain First Line: Praise the Lord, praise the Lord Topics: God - The Father Used With Tune: TO GOD BE THE GLORY

How Great Is Our God

Author: Ed Cash; Chris Tomlin; Jesse Reeves Meter: Irregular Appears in 9 hymnals First Line: The splendor of the King
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I Know Not Why God's Wondrous Grace

Author: D. W. Whittle Appears in 227 hymnals First Line: I know not why God's wondrous grace To me He hath made known Refrain First Line: But "I know whom I have believed Topics: Church Her Faith; Dedication of Building; Perseverance

Tunes

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[Sing praise to God who reigns above]

Appears in 119 hymnals Tune Sources: Bohemian Brethren's Kirchengesänge Tune Key: E Flat Major Incipit: 13451 76565 43234 Used With Text: Canticle of the Holy Trinity
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[God of our fathers, whose almighty hand]

Composer: George William Warren Appears in 154 hymnals Tune Key: F Major Incipit: 11234 31171 33356 Used With Text: God of Our Fathers

[Cheer up ye saints of God, there's nothing to worry about]

Appears in 1 hymnal Tune Sources: Unknown Tune Key: E Flat Major Incipit: 17766 55333 32152 Used With Text: Cheer Up, Ye Saints of God

Instances

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Published text-tune combinations (hymns) from specific hymnals
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Canticle of the Holy Trinity

Author: Francis E. Cox; Johann J. Schütz Hymnal: The United Methodist Hymnal #80 (1989) First Line: Sing praise to God, who reigns above Lyrics: Response (General) Sing praise to God, who reigns above, the God of all creation. Topics: The Glory of the Triune God Praise and Thanksgiving Languages: English Tune Title: [Sing praise to God who reigns above]
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God of Our Fathers

Author: Daniel C. Roberts Hymnal: Children's Hymnal #10 (1957) First Line: God of our fathers, whose almighty hand Lyrics: 1 God of our fathers, whose almighty ... Topics: God's Goodness Languages: English Tune Title: [God of our fathers, whose almighty hand]
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Praise God, from Whom All Blessing Flow

Author: Thomas Ken, 1637-1711 Hymnal: Revival Hymns and Choruses #Front 1 (1970) Lyrics: Praise God, from whom all blessings flow; Praise Him, all creatures here below; Praise Him above, ye heav'nly host; Praise Father, son, and Holy Ghost. Amen. Languages: English Tune Title: OLD HUNDREDTH

People

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Authors, composers, editors, etc.

K.

Person Name: 'K-" Author of "How firm a foundation, you people of God" in Together in Song In John Rippon's A Selection of Hymns (1787, plus numerous subsequent editions), "How Firm a Foundation" (no. 128) is attributed simply to "K—". Two other hymns in the collection bear the same mark, "In songs of sublime adoration and praise," and "The Bible is justly esteemed." The author of the hymn has never been definitively identified, but the most common candidates are listed below. I. Robert Keen(e) The most likely possibility is Robert Keene, who served as precentor at Rippon's church. The evidence for connecting K with Keene comes (1) from his close acquaintance with Rippon, (2) Rippon's tune book, and (3) the testimony (of sorts) of Thomas Walker. After Rippon started publishing a tune book, A Selection of Psalm and Hymn Tunes (1792), to go with his hymnal, both books were cross-referenced against each other; the tunes suggested for "How Firm a Foundation" were GEARD (no. 156) and BROUGHTON (no. 172). Both GEARD and BROUGHTON first appeared in Rippon's tune book and were probably written for it. BROUGHTON is by T. [Thomas] Walker., and GEARD is by R. [Robert] Keene, thus the association with "K.", but the connection is speculative at best. Julian, in his article on "How Firm" in the Dictionary of Hymnology, notes that Walker later assisted Alexander Fletcher with his A Collection of Hymns (1822), and in that collection the text is attributed to Keen. II. George Keith In Josiah Miller's Singers and Songs of the Church (1869), "How Firm" is attributed to George Keith. According to Julian, the motivation behind this attribution was Daniel Sedgwick—-Miller credits him in the preface with having contributed special hymnological knowledge--yet Julian notes that Sedgwick garnered his information from "an old woman whom Sedgwick met in an almshouse." Keith was a publisher in London, and was the son-in-law of Dr. Gill, Rippon's distinguished predecessor at Carter Lane. III. Thomas Kirkham In 19th century editions of Rippon's Selection, the hymn was attributed to "Kirkham." Thomas Kirkham published A Collection of Hymns in 1788, yet "How Firm" was not included. His connection to Rippon is unclear. IV. Kennedy/Kennady Still other collections offer a different possiblity: a Kennedy or Kennady. This attribution appears as early as 1826 in Nettleton's Village Hymns. In Spurgeon's Our Own Hymn Book (1866), he offers "Kirkham or Kennedy, 1787." This person has yet to be identified. V. John Rippon In his preface to the Selection, Rippon wrote: In most places, where the names of the authors were known, they are put at full length, but the hymns which are not so distinguished, or which have only a single letter prefixed to them, were, many of them composed by a person unknown, or else have undergone some considerable alterations. Since Rippon is known to have significantly altered hymns in his collection ("All hail the power of Jesus' name," being a notable example), Rippon likely deserves at least partial credit for texts bearing the mark "K." —Chris Fenner with contributions from Eric Stedfeld, Peter Irvine, and Peter Rehwaldt See also "How Firm a Foundation".

Josiah Conder

1789 - 1855 Person Name: Conder Author of "O thou God, who hearest prayer" in The Hymnal Josiah Conder was born in London, in 1789. He became a publisher, and in 1814 became proprietor of "The Eclectic Review." Subsequently to 1824, he composed a series of descriptive works, called the "Modern Traveller," which appeared in thirty volumes. He also published several volumes of poems and hymns. He was the author of the first "Congregational Hymn Book" (1836). He died in 1855. --Annotations of the Hymnal, Charles Hutchins, M.A. 1872. ========================== Conder, Josiah, fourth son of Thomas Conder, engraver and bookseller, and grandson of the Rev. John Conder, D.D., first Theological Tutor of Homerton College, was born in Falcon Street (City); London, Sept. 17, 1789, and died Dec. 27, 1855. As author, editor and publisher he was widely known. For some years he was the proprietor and editor of the Eclectic Review, and also editor of the Patriot newspaper. His prose works were numerous, and include:— The Modern Traveller, 1830; Italy, 1831; Dictionary of Ancient and Modern Geography, 1834; Life of Bunyan, 1835; Protestant Nonconformity, 1818-19; The Law of the Sabbath, 1830; Epistle to the Hebrews (a translation), 1834; Literary History of the New Testament, 1845, Harmony of History with Prophecy, 1849, and others. His poetical works are:— (1) The Withered Oak,1805; this appeared in the Athenceum. (2) The Reverie, 1811. (3) Star in the East, 1824. (4) Sacred Poems, Domestic Poems, and Miscellaneous Poems, 1824. (5) The Choir and the Oratory; or, Praise and Prayer, 1837. Preface dated Nov. 8, 1836. (6) Hymns of Praise, Prayer, and Devout Meditation, 1856. This last work was in the press at the time of his death, and was revised and published by his son, the Rev. E. R. Conder, M.A. He also contributed many pieces to the magazines and to the Associated Minstrels, 1810, under the signature of " C." In 1838, selections from The Choir and Oratory were published with music by Edgar Sanderson, as Harmonia Sacra. A second volume was added in 1839. To Dr. Collyer’s (q.v.) Hymns, &c, he contributed 3 pieces signed "C"; and to Dr. Leifchild's Original Hymns, 1843, 8 hymns. As a hymn-book editor he was also well known. In 1836 he edited The Congregational Hymn Book: a Supplement to Dr. Watts’s Psalms and Hymns (2nd ed. 1844). To this collection he contributed fifty-six of his own hymns, some of which had previously appeared in The Star in the East, &c. He also published in 1851 a revised edition of Dr. Watts's Psalms and Hymns, and in the game year a special paper on Dr. Watte as The Poet of the Sanctuary, which was read before the Congregational Union at Southampton. The value of his work as Editor of the Congregational Hymn Book is seen in the fact that eight out of every ten of the hymns in that collection are still in use either in Great Britain or America. As a hymn writer Conder ranks with some of the best of the first half of the present century. His finest hymns are marked by much elevation of thought expressed in language combining both force and beauty. They generally excel in unity, and in some the gradual unfolding of the leading idea is masterly. The outcome of a deeply spiritual mind, they deal chiefly with the enduring elements of religion. Their variety in metre, in style, and in treatment saves them from the monotonous mannerism which mars the work of many hymn writers. Their theology, though decidedly Evangelical, is yet of a broad and liberal kind. Doubtless Conder's intercourse with many phases of theological thought as Editor of the Eclectic Review did much to produce this catholicity, which was strikingly shewn by his embodying many of the collects of the Book of Common Prayer, rendered into verse, in his Choir and Oratory. Of his versions of the Psalms the most popular are "How honoured, how dear" (84th), and "O be joyful in the Lord" (100th). His hymns in most extensive use are," Bread of heaven, on Thee I feed; " “Beyond, beyond that boundless sea;" "The Lord is King, lift up thy voice" (this last is one of his best); "Day by day the manna fell;" "How shall I follow him I serve;" "Heavenly Father, to whose eye" (all good specimens of his subdued and pathetic style); and "O shew me not my Saviour dying." This last is full of lyric feeling, and expresses the too often forgotten fact that the Church has a living though once crucified Lord. The popularity of Conder's hymns may be gathered from the fact that at the present time more of them are in common use in Great Britain and America than those of any other writer of the Congregational body, Watts and Doddridge alone excepted. [Rev. W. Garrett Horder] In addition to the hymns named above and others which are annotated under their respective first lines, the following, including two already named (4,16), are also in common use:— i. From Dr. Collyer's Hymns, &c, 1812. 1. When in the hours of lonely woe. Lent. ii. From The Star in the East, &c, 1824. 2. Be merciful, O God of grace. Ps. lxvii. 3. For ever will I bless the Lord. Ps. xxxiv. 4. How honoured, how dear. Ps. lxxxiv. 5. Now with angels round the throne. Doxology. 6. O Thou God, Who hearest prayer. Lent. Dated Sept. 1820. Usually abbreviated. iii. From The Congregational Hymn Book, 1836. 7. Blessed be God, He is not strict. Longsuffering of God. 8. Followers of Christ of every name. Communion of Saints. 9. Grant me, heavenly Lord, to feel. Zeal in Missions desired. 10. Grant, 0 Saviour, to our prayers. Collect 5th S. after Trinity. 11. Head of the Church, our risen Lord. Church Meetings. 12. Holy, holy, holy Lord, in the highest heaven, &c. Praise to the Father. 13. Jehovah's praise sublime. Praise. 14. Leave us not comfortless. Holy Communion. 15. Lord, for Thv Name's sake! such the plea. In National Danger. 16. O be joyful in the Lord. Ps. c. 17. 0 breathe upon this languid frame. Baptism of Holy Spirit desired. 18. 0 give thanks to Him Who made. Thanksgiving for Daily Mercies. 19. 0 God, Protector of the lowly. New Year. 20. 0 God, to whom the happy dead. Burial. 21. 0 God, Who didst an equal mate. Holy Matrimony. 22. 0 God, Who didst Thy will unfold. Holy Scriptures. 23. 0 God, Who dost Thy sovereign might. Prayer Meetings. 24. 0 how shall feeble flesh and blood. Salvation through Christ. 25. 0 how should those be clean who bear. Purity desired for God's Ministers. 26. 0 say not, think not in thy heart. Pressing Onward. 27. 0 Thou divine High Priest. Holy Communion. 28. 0 Thou Who givest all their food. Harvest. 29. 0 Thou Whose covenant is sure. Holy Baptism. 30. Praise on Thee, in Zion-gates. Sunday. 31. Praise the God of all creation. Doxology 32. See the ransomed millions stand. Praise to Christ. 33. The heavens declare His glory. Ps. xix. 34. Thou art the Everlasting Word. Praise to Christ. 35. Thy hands have made and fashioned me. Thanks for Daily Mercies. 36. To all Thy faithful people, Lord. For Pardon. 37. To His own world He came. Ascension. 38. To our God loud praises give. Ps. cxxxvi. 39. Upon a world of guilt and night. Purification of B.V.M. 40. Welcome, welcome, sinner, hear. Invitation to Christ. 41. Wheresoever two or three. Continued Presence of Christ desired. iv. From The Choir and the Oratory, 1837. 42. Baptised into our Saviour's death. Holy Baptism. 43. In the day of my [thy] distress. Ps. xx. 44. 0 comfort to the dreary. Christ the Comforter. v. From Leifchild's Original Hymns, 1843. 45. I am Thy workmanship, 0 Lord. God the Maker and Guardian. 46. 0 Lord, hadst Thou been here! But when. The Resurrection of Lazarus. 47. 'Tis not that I did choose Thee. Chosen of God. This is altered in the Church Praise Book, N. Y., 1882, to “Lord, 'tis not that I did choose Thee," thereby changing the metre from 7.6 to 8.5. vi. From Hymns of Praise, Prayer, &c, 1856. 48. Comrades of the heavenly calling. The Christian race. When to these 48 hymns those annotated under their respective first lines are added, Conder’s hymns in common use number about 60 in all. --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907) =================== Conder, Josiah, p. 256, i. Other hymns are:— 1. O love beyond the reach of thought. The love of God. 2. O Thou, our Head, enthroned on high. Missions. 3. Son of David, throned in light. Divine Enlightenment desired. 4. Thou Lamb of God for sinners slain. Christ the Head of the Church. From "Substantial Truth, 0 Christ, Thou art." These hymns are all from his Hymns of Praise, &c, 1856. --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology, Appendix, Part II (1907)

Samuel Longfellow

1819 - 1892 Person Name: Samuel Longfellow, 1819-1892 Author of "One Holy Church of God Appears" in Hymnal of the Church of God Longfellow, Samuel, B. A., brother of the Poet, was born at Portland, Maine, June 18, 1819, and educated at Harvard, where he graduated in Arts in 1839, and in Theology in 1846. On receiving ordination as an Unitarian Minister, he became Pastor at Fall River, Massachusetts, 1848; at Brooklyn, 1853; and at Germantown, Pennsylvania, 1860. In 1846 he edited, with the Rev. S. Johnson (q. v.), A Book of Hymns for Public and Private Devotion. This collection was enlarged and revised in 1848. In 1859 his Vespers was published, and in 1864 the Unitarian Hymns of the Spirit , under the joint editorship of the Rev. S. Johnson and himself. His Life of his brother, the Poet Longfellow, was published in 1886. To the works named he contributed the following hymns:— i. To A Book of Hymns , revised ed., 1848. 1. Beneath the shadow of the Cross. Love. 2. 0 God, thy children gathered here. Ordination. ii. To the Vespers 1859. 3. Again as evening's shadow falls. Evening. 4. Now on land and sea descending. Evening. iii. To the Hymns of the Spirit, 1864. 5. A voice by Jordan's shore. Advent. 6. Father, give Thy benediction. Ordination. 7. Go forth to life, 0 child of earth. Life's Mission. 8. God of ages and of nations. Holy Scriptures. 9. Holy Spirit, Truth divine. The Holy Spirit desired. 10. I look to Thee in every need. Trust in God. 11. In the beginning was the Word. The Word. 12. Love for all, and can it be? Lent. The Prodigal Son. 13. 0 God, in Whom we live and move. God's Law and Love. 14. 0 God, Thou Giver of all good. Prayer for Food. 15. O still in accents sweet and strong. Missions. 16. 0 Thou, Whose liberal sun and rain. Anniversary of Church dedication. 17. One holy Church of God appears. The Church Universal. 18. Out of the dark, the circling sphere. The Outlook. 19. Peace, peace on earth! the heart of man for ever. Peace on Earth. 20. The loving Friend to all who bowed. Jesus of Nazareth. 21. ’Tis winter now, the fallen snow. Winter. Of these, hymn No. 2 was written for the Ordination of E. E. Hale (q. v.), at Worcester, 1846. Several are included in Martineau's Hymns, 1873. Died Oct. 3, 1892. [Rev. F. M. Bird, M.A.] --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907), p. 685 =============== Longfellow, S., p. 685, i. Since Mr. Longfellow's death on Oct. 3, 1892, his hymns have been collected by his niece, Miss Alice Longfellow, as Hymns and Verses(Houghton, Mifflin & Co., 1904.) From this work we find many of the hymns signed Anon, in the Index to Longfellow and Johnson's Hymns of the Spirit, 1864, were his; several of these, including E. Osier's "O God unseen, yet ever near," were popular English hymns which he rewrote from his own theological standpoint. These re¬written hymns are very widely used by Unitarians and others. During the last ten years the following additional hymns by S. Long¬fellow have come into common use:— 1. Eternal One, Thou living God. Faith in God. 2. God of the earth, the sky, the sea. God in Nature. 3. God's trumpet wakes the slumbering world. Call to duty. 4. Light of ages and of nations. God in and through all time. 5. Lo, the earth is risen again. Spring. (1876.) 6. Now while we sing our closing psalm. Close of Worship. 7. O Life that maketh all things new. Unity. (1874.) 8. O Thou in Whom we live and move. The Divine Law. 9. The summer days are come again. Summer. From his hymn,"The sweet[bright] June days are come again." 10. Thou Lord of lite, our saving health. In Sickness. (1886.) Of these hymns Nos. 2, 3 appeared in the Hymns of the Spirit, 1864, and all with the dates appended in Hymns and Verses, 1904. --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology, New Supplement (1907) ================== http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Samuel_Longfellow

Hymnals

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Published hymn books and other collections

Small Church Music

Editors: Charles Wesley Description: The SmallChurchMusic site was commenced in 2006 grew out of the requests from those struggling to provide suitable music for their services and meetings. Rev. Clyde McLennan was ordained in mid 1960’s and was a pastor in many small Australian country areas, and therefore was acutely aware of this music problem. Having also been trained as a Pipe Organist, recordings on site (which are a subset of the smallchurchmusic.com site) are all actually played by Clyde, and also include piano and piano with organ versions. All recordings are in MP3 format. Churches all around the world use the recordings, with downloads averaging over 60,000 per month. The recordings normally have an introduction, several verses and a slowdown on the last verse. Users are encouraged to use software: Audacity (http://www.audacityteam.org) or Song Surgeon (http://songsurgeon.com) (see http://scm-audacity.weebly.com for more information) to adjust the MP3 number of verses, tempo and pitch to suit their local needs. Copyright notice: Rev. Clyde McLennan, performer in this collection, has assigned his performer rights in this collection to Hymnary.org. Non-commercial use of these recordings is permitted. For permission to use them for any other purposes, please contact manager@hymnary.org. Home/Music(smallchurchmusic.com) List SongsAlphabetically List Songsby Meter List Songs byTune Name About  

Christian Classics Ethereal Hymnary

Publication Date: 2007 Publisher: Grand Rapids, MI: Christian Classics Ethereal Library

Hymns for the Family of God

Publication Date: 1976 Publisher: Paragon Associates, Inc. Publication Place: Nashville, Tenn. Editors: Fred Bock

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