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All:god the father

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Texts

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O Worship the King all glorious above

Author: Robert Grant Meter: 10.10.11.11 Appears in 1,045 hymnals Lyrics: 1 O worship the King all-glorious above, O gratefully sing his power and his love: our shield and defender, the Ancient of Days, pavilioned in splendor and girded with praise. 2 O tell of his might and sing of his grace, whose robe is the light, whose ... Topics: God the Father God in Nature; God the Father His Majesty and Power Used With Tune: [O worship the King all glorious above]
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Praise to the Lord, the Almighty

Author: Joachim Neander; Catherine Winkworth Meter: 14.14.4.7.8 Appears in 363 hymnals First Line: Praise to the Lord! the Almighty, the King of creation! Lyrics: 1 Praise to the Lord, the Almighty, the King of creation! O my soul, praise him, for he is your health and salvation! Come, all who hear; now to his temple draw near, join me in glad adoration. 2 Praise to the Lord, above all things so wondrously reigning; ... Topics: God the Father His Majesty and Power
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This Is the Day the Lord Hath Made

Author: Isaac Watts, 1674-1748 Meter: 8.6.8.6 Appears in 568 hymnals Lyrics: ... is the day the Lord hath made, He calls the hours ... s empire fell; Today the saints His triumphs spread, ... ; Who comes in God, His Father's name, To ... save our sinful race. 5 Hosanna in the ... highest strains The church on earth ... Topics: Jesus Christ Resurrection; Jesus Resurrection; Thanksgiving Scripture: Psalm 118 Used With Tune: ARLINGTON

Tunes

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TO GOD BE THE GLORY

Composer: William H. Doane Meter: 11.11.11.11 with refrain Appears in 156 hymnals Tune Key: A Flat Major Incipit: 55671 51252 33464 Used With Text: To God Be the Glory
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NUN DANKET

Composer: Johann Crüger; Felix Mendelssohn; Phillip E. Allen Meter: Irregular Appears in 330 hymnals Tune Key: F Major Incipit: 55566 53432 32155 Used With Text: Now Thank We All Our God
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AR HYD Y NOS

Meter: 8.4.8.4.8.8.8.4 Appears in 201 hymnals Tune Sources: Welsh traditional; Jones' Relics of the Welsh Bards , 1784 Tune Key: G Major Incipit: 17612 17567 71176 Used With Text: Through the Love of God Our Father

Instances

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God the Father, God the Son

Author: Rev. R. F. Littledale Hymnal: The Hymnal, Revised and Enlarged, as adopted by the General Convention of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the United States of America in the year of our Lord 1892 #528a (1894) Meter: 7.7.7.6 Lyrics: 1 God the Father, God the Son, God the Spirit, Three in One, Hear ... Thou Who hanging on the tree To the thief saidst,"Thou shalt ... , Holy Jesu. 8 Shepherd of the straying sheep, Comforter of them ... live to Thee instead, And the narrow pathway tread: We beseech ... Topics: Litany of the Incarnate Life Languages: English Tune Title: [God the Father, God the Son]

We believe in God the Father

Author: Graham Kendrick Hymnal: Complete Anglican Hymns Old and New #711 (2000) First Line: We believe in God the Father Refrain First Line: Jesus, Lord of all Lyrics: We believe in God the Father, maker of the ... Topics: Christian unity; Year B Palm Sunday: Liturgy of the Passion; Year A Proper 21; Year A Palm Sunday: Liturgy of the Passion; The Witnessing Community; The Holy Trinity; Holy Communion; Faith, Trust and Commitment; Evangelism; Confirmation; Year C Palm Sunday: Liturgy of the Passion Scripture: Philippians 2:5-11 Languages: English Tune Title: [We believe in God the Father]
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O One with God the Father

Author: Bp. W. W. How Hymnal: The Hymnal, Revised and Enlarged, as adopted by the General Convention of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the United States of America in the year of our Lord 1892 #68 (1894) Meter: 7.6 D Lyrics: ... One with God the Father In majesty and might, The brightness of ... now; The shadows flee before Thee, The world's ... We long to track the footprints That Thou Thyself ... see the pathway That leads to Thee our God. 3 ... Jesu, turn upon us The brightness of Thy face. ... Topics: Fellowship with God; Following Christ Languages: English Tune Title: [O One with God the Father]

People

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Authors, composers, editors, etc.

Johann Crüger

1598 - 1662 Composer of "NUN DANKET" in Psalter Hymnal (Gray) Johann Crüger (b. Grossbriesen, near Guben, Prussia, Germany, 1598; d. Berlin, Germany, 1662) Crüger attended the Jesuit College at Olmutz and the Poets' School in Regensburg, and later studied theology at the University of Wittenberg. He moved to Berlin in 1615, where he published music for the rest of his life. In 1622 he became the Lutheran cantor at the St. Nicholas Church and a teacher for the Gray Cloister. He wrote music instruction manuals, the best known of which is Synopsis musica (1630), and tirelessly promoted congregational singing. With his tunes he often included elaborate accom­paniment for various instruments. Crüger's hymn collection, Neues vollkomliches Gesangbuch (1640), was one of the first hymnals to include figured bass accompaniment (musical shorthand) with the chorale melody rather than full harmonization written out. It included eighteen of Crüger's tunes. His next publication, Praxis Pietatis Melica (1644), is considered one of the most important collections of German hymnody in the seventeenth century. It was reprinted forty-four times in the following hundred years. Another of his publications, Geistliche Kirchen Melodien (1649), is a collection arranged for four voices, two descanting instruments, and keyboard and bass accompaniment. Crüger also published a complete psalter, Psalmodia sacra (1657), which included the Lobwasser translation set to all the Genevan tunes. Bert Polman =============================== Crüger, Johann, was born April 9, 1598, at Gross-Breese, near Guben, Brandenburg. After passing through the schools at Guben, Sorau and Breslau, the Jesuit College at Olmütz, and the Poets' school at Regensburg, he made a tour in Austria, and, in 1615, settled at Berlin. There, save for a short residence at the University of Wittenberg, in 1620, he employed himself as a private tutor till 1622. In 1622 he was appointed Cantor of St. Nicholas's Church at Berlin, and also one of the masters of the Greyfriars Gymnasium. He died at Berlin Feb. 23, 1662. Crüger wrote no hymns, although in some American hymnals he appears as "Johann Krüger, 1610,” as the author of the supposed original of C. Wesley's "Hearts of stone relent, relent" (q.v.). He was one of the most distinguished musicians of his time. Of his hymn tunes, which are generally noble and simple in style, some 20 are still in use, the best known probably being that to "Nun danket alle Gott" (q.v.), which is set to No. 379 in Hymns Ancient & Modern, ed. 1875. His claim to notice in this work is as editor and contributor to several of the most important German hymnological works of the 16th century, and these are most conveniently treated of under his name. (The principal authorities on his works are Dr. J. F. Bachmann's Zur Geschichte der Berliner Gesangbücher 1857; his Vortrag on P. Gerhard, 1863; and his edition of Gerhardt's Geistliche Lieder, 1866. Besides these there are the notices in Bode, and in R. Eitner's Monatshefte für Musik-Geschichte, 1873 and 1880). These works are:— 1. Newes vollkömmliches Gesangbuch, Augspur-gischer Confession, &c, Berlin, 1640 [Library of St. Nicholas's Church, Berlin], with 248 hymns, very few being published for the first time. 2. Praxis pietatis melica. Das ist: Ubung der Gottseligkeit in Christlichen und trostreichen Gesängen. The history of this, the most important work of the century, is still obscure. The 1st edition has been variously dated 1640 and 1644, while Crüger, in the preface to No. 3, says that the 3rd edition appeared in 1648. A considerable correspondence with German collectors and librarians has failed to bring to light any of the editions which Koch, iv. 102, 103, quotes as 1644, 1647, 1649, 1650, 1651, 1652, 1653. The imperfect edition noted below as probably that of 1648 is the earliest Berlin edition we have been able to find. The imperfect edition, probably ix. of 1659, formerly in the hands of Dr. Schneider of Schleswig [see Mützell, 1858, No. 264] was inaccessible. The earliest perfect Berlin edition we have found is 1653. The edition printed at Frankfurt in 1656 by Caspar Röteln was probably a reprint of a Berlin edition, c. 1656. The editions printed at Frankfurt-am-Main by B. C. Wust (of which the 1666 is in the preface described as the 3rd) are in considerable measure independent works. In the forty-five Berlin and over a dozen Frankfurt editions of this work many of the hymns of P. Gerhardt, J. Franck, P. J. Spener, and others, appear for the first time, and therein also appear many of the best melodies of the period. 3. Geistliche Kirchen-Melodien, &c, Leipzig, 1649 [Library of St. Katherine's Church, Brandenburg]. This contains the first stanzas only of 161 hymns, with music in four vocal and two instrumental parts. It is the earliest source of the first stanzas of various hymns by Gerhardt, Franck, &c. 4. D. M. Luther's und anderer vornehmen geisU reichen und gelehrten Manner Geistliche Lieder und Psalmen, &c, Berlin, 1653 [Hamburg Town Library], with 375 hymns. This was edited by C. Runge, the publisher, and to it Crüger contributed some 37 melodies. It was prepared at the request of Luise Henriette (q.v.), as a book for the joint use of the Lutherans and the Re¬formed, and is the earliest source of the hymns ascribed to her, and of the complete versions of many hymns by Gerhardt and Franck. 5. Psalmodia Sacra, &c, Berlin, 1658 [Royal Library, Berlin]. The first section of this work is in an ed. of A. Lobwasser's German Psalter; the second, with a similar title to No. 4, and the date 1657, is practically a recast of No. 4,146 of those in 1653 being omitted, and the rest of the 319 hymns principally taken from the Praxis of 1656 and the hymn-books of the Bohemian Brethren. New eds. appeared in 1676, 1700, 1704, 1711, and 1736. [Rev. James Mearns, M.A.] -- Excerpt from John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907) ======================= Crüger, Johann, p. 271, ii. Dr. J. Zahn, now of Neuendettelsau, in Bavaria, has recently acquired a copy of the 5th ed., Berlin, 1653, of the Praxis. --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology, Appendix, Part II (1907)

Daniel C. Roberts

1841 - 1907 Person Name: Daniel Crane Roberts Author of "God of All Ages, Whose Almighty Hand" in Psalter Hymnal (Gray) Daniel C. Roberts (b. Bridgehampton, Long Island, NY, 1841; d. Concord, NH, 1907) Educated at Kenyon College, Gambier, Ohio, served in the union army during the Civil War. He was ordained in the Episcopal Church as a priest in 1866 and ministered to several congregations in Vermont and Massachusetts. In 1878 he began a ministry at St. Paul Church in Concord, New Hampshire, that lasted for twenty-three years. Serving for many years president of the New Hampshire State Historical Society, Roberts once wrote, "I remain a country parson, known only within my small world," but his hymn "God of Our Fathers" brought him widespread recognition. Bert Polman ================= Roberts, Daniel C., D.D., of the Prot. Episcopal Church in America, b. at Bridge Hampton, L.I., Nov. 5, 1841, and graduated at Gambler College, 1857. After serving for a time as a private in the Civil War, he was ordained in 1866. He is at present (1905) Rector of Concord, N.H. His hymn, "God of our fathers, Whose almighty hand " (National Hymn), was written in 1876 for the "Centennial" Fourth of July celebration at Brandon, Vermont. In 1892 it was included in the Protestant Episcopal Hymnal, and again in Sursum Corda, 1898. [Rev. L. F. Benson, D.D.] --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology, New Supplement (1907)

S. Baring-Gould

1834 - 1924 Person Name: Sabine Baring-Gould Translator of "Through the night of doubt and sorrow" in The Hymnal Baring-Gould, Sabine, M.A., eldest son of Mr. Edward Baring-Gould, of Lew Trenchard, Devon, b. at Exeter, Jan. 28, 1834, and educated at Clare College, Cambridge, B.A. 1857, M.A. 1860. Taking Holy Orders in 1864, he held the curacy of Horbury, near Wakefield, until 1867, when he was preferred to the incumbency of Dalton, Yorks. In 1871 he became rector of East Mersea, Essex, and in 1881 rector of Lew Trenchard, Devon. His works are numerous, the most important of which are, Lives of the Saints, 15 vols., 1872-77; Curious Myths of the Middle Ages, 2 series, 1866-68; The Origin and Development of Religious Belief, 2 vols., 1869-1870; and various volumes of sermons. His hymns, original and translated, appeared in the Church Times; Hymns Ancient & Modern, 1868 and 1875; The People's Hymnal, 1867, and other collections, the most popular being "Onward, Christian soldiers," "Daily, daily sing the praises," the translation "Through the night of doubt and sorrow," and the exquisite Easter hymn, "On the Resurrection Morning." His latest effort in hymnology is the publication of original Church Songs, 1884, of which two series have been already issued. In the Sacristy for Nov. 1871, he also contributed nine carols to an article on "The Noels and Carols of French Flanders.” These have been partially transferred to Chope's and Staniforth's Carol Books, and also to his Church Songs. --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907) ================== Baring-Gould, S., p. 114, i. Other hymns in common use are:— 1. Forward! said the Prophet. Processional. Appeared in the New Mitre Hymnal, 1874. 2. My Lord, in glory reigning. Christ in Glory. In Mrs. Brock's Children's Hymn Book, 1881. 3. Now severed is Jordan. Processional. Appeared in the S. Mary, Aberdeen, Hymnal, 1866, the People's Hymnal, 1867, &c. --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology, Appendix, Part II (1907)

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