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Search Results

All:heaven

Looking for other resources related to Heaven? Check out PreachingandWorship.org.

Texts

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When We All Get to Heaven

Author: Eliza E. Hewitt Meter: 8.7.8.7 with refrain Appears in 260 hymnals First Line: Sing the wondrous love of Jesus Lyrics: ... : When we all get to heaven, what a day of rejoicing ... Topics: New Heaven and a New Earth Death and Eternal Life; Heaven Used With Tune: HEAVEN
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Heaven is my home

Author: Thomas R. Taylor Meter: 6.4.6.4.6.6.6.4 Appears in 587 hymnals First Line: I'm but a stranger here Lyrics: ... on every hand, Heaven is my fatherland, Heaven is my home ... though the tempest rage? Heaven is my home; Short ... is my pilgrimage, Heaven is my home; And ... I shall be glorified, Heaven is my home; There ... s right hand, Heaven is my fatherland: Heaven is my home ... Topics: Heavenly Mind Used With Tune: [I'm but a stranger here]
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How Beautiful Heaven Must Be

Author: Mrs. A. S. Bridgewater Meter: 9.8.9.8.8.8.9.8 Appears in 68 hymnals First Line: We read of a place that's called heaven Refrain First Line: How beautiful heaven must be Lyrics: ... He hath given, How beautiful heaven must be. Refrain: How beautiful ... , How beautiful heaven must be. 2 In heaven no drooping nor ... forever there shining, How beautiful heaven must be. [Refrain] 3 ... splendor are glowing, How beautiful heaven must be. [Refrain] 4 ... Scripture: Revelation 21 Used With Tune: [We read of a place that's called heaven] Text Sources: Timeless Truths (http://library.timelesstruths.org/music/How_Beautiful_Heaven_Must_Be); Anonymous/Unknown, The Blue Book (165)

Tunes

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Tune authorities
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HEAVEN

Composer: Emily D. Wilson Meter: 8.7.8.7 with refrain Appears in 99 hymnals Tune Key: C Major Incipit: 55513 45653 44432 Used With Text: When We All Get to Heaven
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LAUDA ANIMA

Composer: John Goss Meter: 8.7.8.7.8.7 Appears in 172 hymnals Tune Key: D Major Incipit: 55551 76543 65342 Used With Text: Praise, My Soul, the King of Heaven

HEAVEN CAME DOWN

Composer: John W. Peterson Meter: Irregular Appears in 19 hymnals Tune Key: F Major Incipit: 33332 13331 33332 Used With Text: Heaven Came Down

Instances

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Published text-tune combinations (hymns) from specific hymnals
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Look Away to Heaven

Author: J. A. E. Hymnal: Timeless Truths #457 Meter: 11.7.11.7 D First Line: Look away, dear pilgrim, to heaven above Refrain First Line: Look away to heaven - what glory awaits! Lyrics: ... Look away, dear pilgrim, to heaven above: Jesus is waiting for ... view. Refrain: Look away to heaven—what glory awaits! Watch, lest ... — Jesus is waiting for me; Heaven has my heart-strings, for ... heaven I’m bound, With Him in heaven I’ll ... Topics: Exhortation Scripture: Colossians 3:1-3 Tune Title: [Look away, dear pilgrim, to heaven above]
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How Beautiful Heaven Must Be

Author: Mrs. A. S. Bridgewater Hymnal: Timeless Truths #812 Meter: 9.8.9.8.8.8.9.8 First Line: We read of a place that's called heaven Refrain First Line: How beautiful heaven must be Lyrics: ... He hath given, How beautiful heaven must be. Refrain: How beautiful ... , How beautiful heaven must be. 2 In heaven no drooping nor ... forever there shining, How beautiful heaven must be. [Refrain] 3 ... splendor are glowing, How beautiful heaven must be. [Refrain] 4 ... Scripture: Revelation 21 Tune Title: [We read of a place that's called heaven]
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Shadows Never Darken Heaven

Author: Christian K. Hostetler, 1865-1935 Hymnal: The Christian Hymnary. Bks. 1-4 #949 (1972) Meter: 8.7.8.7 with refrain Refrain First Line: There shall be no night in heaven Lyrics: 1 Shadows never darken heaven, Endless day shall banish night; ... shall be no night in heaven, There shall be no darkness ... Topics: Heaven Desire, Hope, Prospect for Scripture: Revelation 21:23 Languages: English Tune Title: NO NIGHT IN HEAVEN

People

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Authors, composers, editors, etc.

Johann Sebastian Bach

1685 - 1750 Person Name: Johann Sebastian Bach Composer (melody) of "PASSION CHORALE" in Worship in Song Johann Sebastian Bach was born at Eisenach into a musical family and in a town steeped in Reformation history, he received early musical training from his father and older brother, and elementary education in the classical school Luther had earlier attended. Throughout his life he made extraordinary efforts to learn from other musicians. At 15 he walked to Lüneburg to work as a chorister and study at the convent school of St. Michael. From there he walked 30 miles to Hamburg to hear Johann Reinken, and 60 miles to Celle to become familiar with French composition and performance traditions. Once he obtained a month's leave from his job to hear Buxtehude, but stayed nearly four months. He arranged compositions from Vivaldi and other Italian masters. His own compositions spanned almost every musical form then known (Opera was the notable exception). In his own time, Bach was highly regarded as organist and teacher, his compositions being circulated as models of contrapuntal technique. Four of his children achieved careers as composers; Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven, Mendelssohn, Schumann, Brahms, and Chopin are only a few of the best known of the musicians that confessed a major debt to Bach's work in their own musical development. Mendelssohn began re-introducing Bach's music into the concert repertoire, where it has come to attract admiration and even veneration for its own sake. After 20 years of successful work in several posts, Bach became cantor of the Thomas-schule in Leipzig, and remained there for the remaining 27 years of his life, concentrating on church music for the Lutheran service: over 200 cantatas, four passion settings, a Mass, and hundreds of chorale settings, harmonizations, preludes, and arrangements. He edited the tunes for Schemelli's Musicalisches Gesangbuch, contributing 16 original tunes. His choral harmonizations remain a staple for studies of composition and harmony. Additional melodies from his works have been adapted as hymn tunes. --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907)

P. P. Bliss

1838 - 1876 Person Name: Philip P. Bliss, 1838-1876 Author of "I Am So Glad That Our Father in Heaven" in Trinity Hymnal (Rev. ed.) Bliss, Philip, b. at Clearfield County, Pennsylvania, July 9, 1838. In 1864 he went to Chicago in the employ of Dr. George F. Root, the musician, where he was engaged in conducting musical Institutes, and in composing Sunday School melodies. Originally a Methodist, he became, about 1871, a choirman of the First Congregational Church, Chicago, and the Superintendent of its Sunday Schools. In 1874 he joined D. W. Whittle in evangelical work. To this cause he gave (although a poor man) the royalty of his Gospel Songs, which was worth some thirty thousand dollars. His death was sudden. It occurred in the railway disaster at Ashtabula, Ohio, Dec. 30, 1876. ... Some of his verses have obtained wide popularity in most English-speaking countries. The more widely known, and specially those which are found in collections in use in G. Britain, are in the following American works:— i. The Prize, 1870. 1. I should like to die. Death anticipated. This is one of his earliest compositions, and is unworthy of the position it holds. 2. Through the valley of the shadow I must go. Death anticipated. 3. Whosoever heareth, shout, shout the sound. Jesus the Way. Written during the winter of 1869-70 after hearing Mr. H. Moorhouse (from England) preach on St. John iii. 16. ii. The Charm, 1871. 4. Almost persuaded now to believe. Procrastination. This was suggested by the following passage in a sermon by the Rev. Mr. Brundnge, Bliss being present at its delivery:—" He who is almost persuaded is almost saved, but to be almost saved is to be entirely lost." 5. Ho! my comrades! see the signal. Faithfulness. 6. O! Jerusalem, the golden city, bright, &c. Heaven. 7. On what Foundation do [did] you build? Christ the Foundation. iii. The Song Tree, 1872. 8. Light in the darkness, sailor, day is at hand. Safety. This hymn, “The Life-Boat," has attained to great popularity. The incident upon which it is based, that of the rescue of a ship's crew by a life-boat, is given in detail by Mr. Sankey in his Sacred Songs, &c, No. 99 (large ed.). It is sometimes known by its refrain, "Pull for the shore," &c. iv. The Joy, 1873. 9. In me ye may have peace. Peace. 10. To die is gain. Death anticipated. v. Sunshine, 1873. 11. Down life's dark vale we wander. Death anticipated. 12. More holiness give me. For Holiness. 13. Only an armour-bearer. Soldiers of the Cross. 14. Standing by a purpose true. Faithfulness. 15. This loving Saviour stands patiently. Invitation. vi. Gospel Songs, 1874. 16. A long time I wandered. Peace and Joy. 17. Brightly beams our Father's mercy. Mercy. 18. Come, brethren, as we march along. Praise. 19. Free from the law, O happy condition. Redemption. 20. Have you on the Lord believed? Fullness of Grace. This hymn arose out of the following circumstances :—" A vast fortune was left in the hands of a minister for one of his poor parishioners. Fearing that it might be sqmandered if suddenly bestowed upon him, the wise minister sent him a little at a time, with a note saying, “This is thine; use it wisely; there is more to follow.” Hence also the refrain ‘More to follow,’ by which the hymn is known." 21. How much owest thou? Divine Claims. 22. I know not the hour when my Lord will come. Death anticipated. Suggested by reading the book, The Gates Ajar. 23. See the gentle Shepherd standing. The Good Shepherd. 24. Though the way be sometimes dreary. Divine Leading. 25. Will you meet me at the fountain? Fountain of Living Water. The incident out of which this hymn arose is thus stated in The Christian, No. 365, "At the Industrial Exposition at Chicago it was an everyday appointment to meet at the Central Fountain. Mr. P. P. Bliss, whose mind seemed always set on things above, caught up the words, and wrote this hymn, 'Meet me at the Fountain.'" vii. Gospel Hymns, No. 1, 1875. 26. One offer of salvation. The Name of Jesus. 27. Wandering afar from the dwellings of men. The Lepers. viii. The International Lesson Monthly, 1875. 28. Weary gleaner, whence comest thou? Duty. 29. The whole world was lost in the darkness of Sin. Light of the world. 30. Man of sorrows! what a name. Redemption. 31. The Spirit, O sinner, in mercy doth move. Holy Spirit. ix. Gospel Hymns, No. 2, 1876. 32. At the feet of Jesus. The good choice. 33. Come, sing the Gospel's joyful sound. Salvation. 34. Cut it down, cut it down. Justice and Mercy. 35. Do you see the Hebrew captive? Prayer. 36. Hallelujah, He is risen. Easier. Written in the spring of 1876 and first sung by Bliss on Easter afternoon, 1876, in the Court House Square, Augusta, Georgia, to 5900 people. 37. In Zion's rock abiding. Safety. 38. Repeat the story o'er and o'er. Grace and Peace. 39. Tenderly the Shepherd. The Good Shepherd. x. Gospel Hymns, No. 3, 1878. 40. Hear ye the glad good news from heaven. Faith and Salvation. 41. I will sing of my Redeemer. Praise. xi. Gospel Hymns, No. 4, 1881. 42. 'Tis known on earth and heaven too. More about Jesus. xii. Various. 43. Sing over again to me. Words of Life. This appeared in a paper entitled Words of Life, 1874, The following are undated:— 44. March to the battle-field. Duty and Victory. 45. There is sin in the camp. Hinderances. 46. 'Tis the promise of God. Praise. 47. While the silvery moon-beams, fall, New Birth. 48. God is always near me. Omnipresence. Two hymns," I am so glad that our Father in heaven," and " Sowing the seed by the daylight [dawnlight] fair," (sometimes given as " Sowing our seed in the morning fair ") are usually attributed to Mr. Bliss. In his Gospel Songs, Cincinnati, 1874, however, he lays claim to the music only. Mr. Sankey attributes this last to "E. A. Oakey." With the exception of No. 48, these hymns are given in Mr. Sankey's Sacred Songs & Solos, Pts. i. and ii. Their popularity is far beyond their literary merits, and is mainly due to the simple melodies to which they are wedded. As a writer of hymns of this class Mr. Bliss is second only to Mrs. Van Alstyne. Many anecdotes concerning hymns of this class are given in American Evangelists; an Account of their work in England and America, by the Rev. Elias Nason, Boston, U.S., Lathrop & Co., 1877. Mr. Bliss is usually known as "P. P. Bliss." This is found on the title-pages of his collections. On his own authority, however, we are enabled to say that his name originally stood thus : “Philipp Bliss.” Early in life he separated the final p from his Christian name, constituted it a capital P, and thus produced "P. P. Bliss." (For this article we are mainly indebted to Professor F. M. Bird, and Mr. H. P. Main.) -John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907) ======================== Bliss, Philip , p. 151, i. "Sowing the seed by the daylight fair" is in the Family Treasury , Edinburgh, 1861, pt. i., p. 84. It is said to be by Miss Emily Sullivan Oakey; born at Albany, N. York, Oct. 8, 1829, died May 11, 1883. Note also that Bliss's hymn, No. 43. on p. 150, ii., should read, "Sing them over again to me." --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology, Appendix, Part II (1907) ===================== Bliss, P., p. 150, i. Two works have been brought to our notice, since the issue of our first edition of this Dictionary, which concern this author, viz.:— 1. Memoirs of Philip P. Bliss. Edited by D. W. Whittle. Contributions by Rev. E. P. Goodwin, Ira D. Sankey, and Geo. F. Root. Introduction by D. L. Moody. New York, &c.: A. S. Barnes & Co., 1877. 2. My Life and Sacred Songs. By Ira D. Sankey. With an Introduction by Theodore L. Cuyler, D.D). London: Hodder & Stoughton, and Morgan & Scott, 1906. These works have a special interest for those who use I. D. Sankey's Sacred Songs & Solos, and all of P. Bliss's publications. To Mr. Sankey's My Life, &c, we direct special attention for P. Bliss's hymns:— “Do you see the Hebrew captive kneeling?" p. 294. "Down life's dark vale we wander." p. 285. "Ho! my comrades, see the signal." p. 105. "'Tis the promise of God full salvation to give." p. 99. --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology, New Supplement (1907)

Catherine Winkworth

1827 - 1878 Translator of "From Heaven High I Come to You" in Trinity Hymnal (Rev. ed.) Catherine Winkworth is "the most gifted translator of any foreign sacred lyrics into our tongue, after Dr. Neale and John Wesley; and in practical services rendered, taking quality with quantity, the first of those who have laboured upon German hymns. Our knowledge of them is due to her more largely than to any or all other translators; and by her two series of Lyra Germanica, her Chorale Book, and her Christian Singers of Germany, she has laid all English-speaking Christians under lasting obligation." --Annotations of the Hymnal, Charles Hutchins, M.A., 1872 ======================== Winkworth, Catherine, daughter of Henry Winkworth, of Alderley Edge, Cheshire, was born in London, Sep. 13, 1829. Most of her early life was spent in the neighbourhood of Manchester. Subsequently she removed with the family to Clifton, near Bristol. She died suddenly of heart disease, at Monnetier, in Savoy, in July, 1878. Miss Winkworth published:— Translations from the German of the Life of Pastor Fliedner, the Founder of the Sisterhood of Protestant Deaconesses at Kaiserworth, 1861; and of the Life of Amelia Sieveking, 1863. Her sympathy with practical efforts for the benefit of women, and with a pure devotional life, as seen in these translations, received from her the most practical illustration possible in the deep and active interest which she took in educational work in connection with the Clifton Association for the Higher Education of Women, and kindred societies there and elsewhere. Our interest, however, is mainly centred in her hymnological work as embodied in her:— (1) Lyra Germanica, 1st Ser., 1855. (2) Lyra Germanica, 2nd Ser., 1858. (3) The Chorale Book for England (containing translations from the German, together with music), 1863; and (4) her charming biographical work, the Christian Singers of Germany, 1869. In a sympathetic article on Miss Winkworth in the Inquirer of July 20, 1878, Dr. Martineau says:— "The translations contained in these volumes are invariably faithful, and for the most part both terse and delicate; and an admirable art is applied to the management of complex and difficult versification. They have not quite the fire of John Wesley's versions of Moravian hymns, or the wonderful fusion and reproduction of thought which may be found in Coleridge. But if less flowing they are more conscientious than either, and attain a result as poetical as severe exactitude admits, being only a little short of ‘native music'" Dr. Percival, then Principal of Clifton College, also wrote concerning her (in the Bristol Times and Mirror), in July, 1878:— "She was a person of remarkable intellectual and social gifts, and very unusual attainments; but what specially distinguished her was her combination of rare ability and great knowledge with a certain tender and sympathetic refinement which constitutes the special charm of the true womanly character." Dr. Martineau (as above) says her religious life afforded "a happy example of the piety which the Church of England discipline may implant.....The fast hold she retained of her discipleship of Christ was no example of ‘feminine simplicity,' carrying on the childish mind into maturer years, but the clear allegiance of a firm mind, familiar with the pretensions of non-Christian schools, well able to test them, and undiverted by them from her first love." Miss Winkworth, although not the earliest of modern translators from the German into English, is certainly the foremost in rank and popularity. Her translations are the most widely used of any from that language, and have had more to do with the modern revival of the English use of German hymns than the versions of any other writer. -- John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907) ============================ See also in: Hymn Writers of the Church

Hymnals

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Published hymn books and other collections

Bit of Heaven Song Book

Publication Date: 1963 Publisher: Louis Paul Lehman, Bit of Heaven Ministry Publication Place: Grand Rapids, Mich. Editors: L. P. Lehman; Louis Paul Lehman, Bit of Heaven Ministry

Small Church Music

Description: The SmallChurchMusic site was commenced in 2006 grew out of the requests from those struggling to provide suitable music for their services and meetings. Rev. Clyde McLennan was ordained in mid 1960’s and was a pastor in many small Australian country areas, and therefore was acutely aware of this music problem. Having also been trained as a Pipe Organist, recordings on site (which are a subset of the smallchurchmusic.com site) are all actually played by Clyde, and also include piano and piano with organ versions. All recordings are in MP3 format. Churches all around the world use the recordings, with downloads averaging over 60,000 per month. The recordings normally have an introduction, several verses and a slowdown on the last verse. Users are encouraged to use software: Audacity (http://www.audacityteam.org) or Song Surgeon (http://songsurgeon.com) (see http://scm-audacity.weebly.com for more information) to adjust the MP3 number of verses, tempo and pitch to suit their local needs. Copyright notice: Rev. Clyde McLennan, performer in this collection, has assigned his performer rights in this collection to Hymnary.org. Non-commercial use of these recordings is permitted. For permission to use them for any other purposes, please contact manager@hymnary.org. Home/Music(smallchurchmusic.com) List SongsAlphabetically List Songsby Meter List Songs byTune Name About  

Beams of Heaven

Publication Date: 2006 Publisher: General Board of Global Ministries, United Methodist Church Publication Place: Nashville, TN, Cincinnati, OH, New York, NY Editors: Charles Albert Tindley; S. T. Kimbrough, Jr.; Carlton R. Young

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