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We praise Thee, O God, our Lord and our King!

Author: Rev. Ambrose M. Schmidt, 1857- Appears in 8 hymnals Topics: Heresies Used With Tune: LYONS
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The Church's one foundation

Author: Rev. Samuel John Stone, 1839- Appears in 749 hymnals Topics: Heresies Used With Tune: AURELIA

The golden heresy of truth

Author: G. W. Russell Appears in 1 hymnal First Line: The generations as they rise

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AURELIA

Composer: S. S. Wesley (1810-1876) Meter: 7.6.7.6 D Appears in 471 hymnals Tune Key: E Flat Major Incipit: 33343 32116 54345 Used With Text: The church’s one foundation
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WEBB

Composer: George James Webb Meter: 7.6.7.6 D Appears in 497 hymnals Tune Key: B Flat Major Incipit: 51131 16151 2325 Used With Text: The Church's One Foundation
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ST. CATHERINE

Composer: H. F. Hemy, 1818-88; J. G. Walton, 1821-1905 Meter: 8.8.8.8.8.8 Appears in 336 hymnals Tune Key: G Major Incipit: 32117 12671 17651 Used With Text: Awake, Thou Spirit, Who Didst Fire

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Published text-tune combinations (hymns) from specific hymnals

The golden heresy of truth

Author: G. W. Russell Hymnal: Hymns for the Celebration of Life #d226 (1964) First Line: The generations as they rise

The church’s one foundation

Author: S. J. Stone (1839-1900) Hymnal: Hymns for Today's Church (2nd ed.) #501 (1987) Meter: 7.6.7.6 D Lyrics: her long divided by heresy and sect; yet she ... Topics: God's Church Unity and Growth; Pentecost 12 The Witnessing Community; Pentecost 3 The Life of the Baptized; Pentecost 2 The Church's Unity and Fellowship; Pentecost 2 The People of God; Trinity Sunday The Trinity; Lent 2, The King and the Kingdom Conflict; Epiphany 4, Revelation The New Temple; The Remnant of Israel; Pentecost 13 The Suffering Community Scripture: Ephesians 5:25-27 Tune Title: AURELIA
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The Church's One Foundation

Author: Samuel J. Stone Hymnal: Hymns of Faith #77 (1980) Lyrics: ... , By schisms rent asunder, By heresies distressed; Yet saints their watch ... Topics: Church Militant and Triumphant; Worship; Church Militant and Triumphant; Worship Scripture: Matthew 16:18 Tune Title: [The Church's one foundation]

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S. J. Stone

1839 - 1900 Person Name: S. J. Stone (1839-1900) Author of "The church’s one foundation" in Hymns for Today's Church (2nd ed.) Stone, Samuel John, a clergyman of the Church of England, the son of Rev. William Stone, was born at Whitmore, Staffordshire, April 25, 1839. He was educated at Pembroke College, Oxford, where he was graduated B.A. in 1862. Later he took orders and served various Churches. He succeeded his father at St. Paul's, Haggerstown, in 1874. He was the author of many original hymns and translations, which were collected and published in 1886. His hymns are hopeful in spirit and skillfully constructed. He published several poetic volumes. He died November 19, 1900 --Hymn Writers of the Church, 1915 (Charles Nutter) ============================ Stone, Samuel John, M.A., son of the Rev. William Stone, M.A., was born at Whitmore, Staffordshire, April 25, 1839, and educated at the Charterhouse; and at Pembroke College, Oxford, B.A. 1862; and M.A. 1872. On taking Holy Orders he became Curate of Windsor in 1862, and of St. Paul's, Haggerston, 1870. In 1874 he succeeded his father, at St. Paul's, Haggerston. Mr. Stone's poetical works are (1) Lyra Fidelium, 1866; (2) The Knight of Intercession and Other Poems, 1872, 6th edition, 1887; (3) Sonnets of the Christian Year, first printed in the Leisure Hour, and then published by the R. T. Society, 1875; (4) Hymns, a collection of his original pieces and translations, 1886. He has also published Order of The Consecutive Church Service for Children, with Original Hymns, 1883. Mr. Stone's hymns, most of which are in common use, and several of which have a wide popularity, include:— 1. A sower went to sow his seed. The Sower. In his Hymns, 1886, the author says this hymn was ”Written specially in allusion to the sixteen years' work of the first Vicar [his Father] of St. Paul's, Haggerston, to whom the Parish was given in 1858, without Church, or School, or "Vicarage, or Endowment." 2. Bear the troubles of thy life. Patience. A translation of Thomas a Kempis's “Ad versa mundi tolera" (p. 23, ii.) made for the Rev. S. Kettlewell's Thomas á Kempis, 1882. 3. By Paul at war in Gentile lands. St. Mark. Written at Windsor in 1870, and published in his Knight of Intercession, 1872. 4. By Shepherds first was heard. Carol. Written in 1885, and published in the Parochial Magazine, 1885. 5. By Thy love which shone for aye. Litany of the Love of God. Written at Haggerston in 1883, and printed in the Monthly Packet, 1884. 6. Christ the Wisdom and the Power. For Church Workers. Written for the Church Society of St. Paul's, Haggerston in 1812, and published in The Knight of Intercession, 1872. 7. Dark is the sky that overhangs my soul. Sorrow succeeded by Joy. Written at Windsor in 1869 for the Monthly Packet, and printed therein 1869. Published in The Knight of Intercession, 1872, under the title of "Light at Eventide." 8. Deeply dark and deeply still. The Transfiguration. Written in 1871 and published in The Knight of Intercession, 1872. 9. Eastward, ever eastward. Processional for Sunday Morning. Written at Haggerston in 1876, and published in the Monthly Packet, 1884. 10. Faith, who sees beyond the portal. Faith, Hope, and Charity. Written at Windsor in 1869, and published in the Monthly Packet, 1869, and The Knight of Intercession, 1872. 11. Far off our brethren's voices. Missions. Written for the First Day of Intercession for Foreign Missions, 1871, and published in The Knight of Intercession, 1872. "For Colonial Missions." 12. Give the word, Eternal King. Missions. Written for the First Day of Intercession for Foreign Missions, 1871. 13. Glory in heaven to God. Christmas Carol. Written in 1882 for G. H. Leslie's Cantata The First Christmas Morn, 1882. 14. God the Father, All, and One. For Unity. Written in 1883 for Canon G. Venables's Service for Unity, and appeared in the Monthly Packet, 1884. 15. God the Father's Only Son. Offices of Christ. Published in his Lyra Fidelium, 1866, on Article ii.of the Apostles' Creed, "And in Jesus Christ His Only Son our Lord." 16. God the Spirit, we adore Thee. The Holy Ghost. Published in his Lyra Fidelium, 1866, or) Article viii. of the Apostles' Creed, "I believe in the Holy Ghost." 17. Great Captain of God's armies. For Purity. Written in 1884 for the Church of England Purity Society, and printed in Church Bells, April 10, 1885. 18. Homeward we pass in peace. Close of Divine Service. Written in 1884 at Haggerston; and included in the author's Hymns, 1886, as a "Hymn after Benediction." 19. How can we praise Thee, Father? For the Fatherless. Written by request for "The Church of England Central Home for Waifs and Strays," 1882, and printed in the Monthly Packet, 1884. 20. Is there no hope for those who lie? Missions. Written in 1870 for the Monthly Packet; and also included in The Knight of Intercession, 1872. 21. Jesu, to my heart most precious. Jesus, All in All. A translation of Thomas á Kempis's "De dulcedine Jesu," made for the Rev. S. Kettlewell's Thomas á Kempis, 1882. 22. Lo! They were, and they are, and shall be. St. Michael and All Angels. Written in 1875 for The Scottish Guardian, in which it was given in 1875. 23. Lord Christ, my Master dear. For Church Workers. Written for the Sunday School Teachers of St. Paul's, Haggerston, 1885, and given in his Hymns, 1886. 24. Lord of the harvest, it is right and meet. Missions, Thanksgiving. Written for the Second Day of Intercession for Foreign Missions, 1871, and published in The Knight of Intercession, 1872. In the 1889 Appendix to Hymns Ancient & Modern it is somewhat altered. 25. Most true, most High; O Trinity. Holy Trinity. A translation of Thomas á Kempis's "O vera summa Trinitas" made for the Rev. S. Kettlewell's Thomas á Kempis, 1882. 26. My Saviour! I behold Thy life. Passiontide. Published in his Lyra Fidelium, 1866, on Article iv. of the Apostles' Creed, "Suffered under Pontius Pilate, was Crucified, Dead, and Buried." 27. Need hath the golden city none. Evening. Written at Windsor in 1869, and was published in the Monthly Packet in 1870. Also in The Knight of Intercession, 1872. 28. None else but Thee for evermore. God the Father. The opening hymn of his Lyra Fidelium, 1866, on Article i. of the Apostles' Creed, "I believe in God the Father Almighty, Maker of Heaven and Earth." 29. 0 joy, the purest, noblest. Evening. A translation in two parts of Thomas á Kempis's "O qualis quantaque laetitia" made for the Rev. S. Kettlewell's Thomas á Kempis, 1882. Pt. ii. begins "State of divinest splendour!" 30. 0 Thou by Whom the saints abide. Litany of the Holy Spirit. Written for a Confirmation at Haggerston, 1875, and included in the 3rd edition of The Knight of Intercession, 1875. 31. 0 Thou Whose love paternal. Holy Matrimony. Written at Windsor in 1863. 32. On Olivet a little band. Ascension. Published in his Lyra Fidelium, 1866, on Article vi. of the Apostles’ Creed, “He ascended into Heaven," &c. 33. Peace: legacy of mystic power. Peace . Written in 1882 for The Society of St. Katharine for Invalids, and published in the Monthly Packet, 1884. 34. Remember Me, show forth My death. Holy Communion. Written at Windsor for the Monthly Packet, in 1870; and included in The Knight of Intercession, 1872. 35. The Son forsook the Father's home. Christmas. Published in his Lyra Fidelium, 1866, on Art. iii. of the Apostles' Creed, “Who was conceived by the Holy Ghost, Born of the Virgin Mary." 36. The old year's long campaign is o'er. The New Year. Written at Windsor in 1868, and published in The Knight of Intercession, 1872. 37. The whole creation groans and cries. Travail of the Creation. Written at Windsor for the Monthly Packet, 1869, and included in The Knight of Intercession, 1872. 38. The world is sad with hopes that die. Everlasting Life. Published in his Lyra Fidelium, 1866, on Art. xii. of the Apostles' Creed, "The Life Everlasting." 39. Their names are names of Kings. Saints Days. Written at Windsor for the Monthly Packet in 1869, and included in The Knight of Intercession, 1872. 40. There is an ancient river. The Spiritual River. Written at Windsor for the Monthly Packet, in 1870; and given in The Knight of Intercession, 1872. 41. Thou Who hast charged Thine elder sons. For School Teachers. Written in 1881 for St. Katharine's Training College for Mistresses; and subsequently adapted for use by teachers of both sexes. 42. Thou Who didst love us when our woes began. Temperance. Written for the Church of England Temperance Society Magazine, 1866. 43. Through midnight gloom from Macedon. Missions. Written for the First Day of Intercession for Foreign Missions, 1871. 44. Unchanging God, hear from eternal heaven. On behalf of the Jews. Written for the East London Mission to the Jews, 1885. It is included in an abridged form in the 1889 Appendix to Hymns Ancient & Modern. 45. While the Shepherds kept their vigil. Christmas Carol. Written at Windsor in 1868. 46. Winter in his heart of gloom. The Resurrection of the Body. Published in his Lyra Fidelium, 1866, on Article xi. of the Apostles' Creed, "The Resurrection of the Body." 47. Wistful are our waiting eyes. The Judgment. Published in his Lyra Fidelium, 1866, on Art. vii. of the Apostles' Creed, "From thence He shall come to judge the quick and the dead." 48. Ye faithful few of Israel's captive days. Holy Scriptures. Written at Windsor for the Monthly Packet, in 1869. Some of Mr. Stone's finer hymns, including "Round the Sacred City gather;" "The Church's One Foundation;" "Weary of earth and laden with my sin," and others, are annotated under their respective first lines. These, together with the 48 above, are given in his Hymns, 1886, some of the translations being recast. Additional translations from Thomas á Kempis are also noted under his name. Another hymn, inseparably associated with Mr. Stone's name is:— 49. Lord of our Soul's salvation. National Thanksgiving. This was ordered by command of Her Majesty the Queen to be sung at the Thanksgiving for the recovery of H. R. H. The Prince of Wales, on Feb. 27, 1872. In its original form it was in 7 stanzas of 8 lines, and was thus sung throughout the country. Owing however to the necessary restrictions as to time in the Cathedral service, a selection of four verses only--the First, a combination of the 2nd and 4th, the 6th, and the 7th--was adapted by the author for use in St. Paul's." The full text was included in The Knight of Intercession, 1872. Mr. Stone's hymns vary considerably in metre and subject, and thus present a pleasing variety not always found in the compositions of popular hymnwriters. His best hymns are well designed and clearly expressed. The tone is essentially dogmatic and hopeful. The absence of rich poetic thought and graceful fancy is more than atoned for by a masterly condensation of Scripture facts and of Church teaching given tersely and with great vigour. His changes and antitheses are frequently abrupt, in many instances too much so for congregational purposes, and his vocabulary is somewhat limited. His rhythm, except where broken either by long or by compound words, is rarely at fault, and his rhyme is usually perfect. A few of his hymns are plaintive and pathetic, as the tender "Weary of earth and laden with my sin;" others are richly musical, as "Lord of the harvest! it is right and meet:" but the greater part are strongly outspoken utterances of a manly faith, where dogma, prayer, and praise are interwoven with much skill. Usually the keynote of his song is Hope. He died Nov. 19, 1900. -- John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907) ===================== Stone, S. J. , p. 1095, i. Of his hymns noted there the following appeared in Mission Life, 1872, vol. iii., pt. ii., pp. 685-88. No. 11, "Far off our brethren's voices," for Church Missionary Hymn Book, Colonial Missions, and No. 12, "Give the word, Eternal King," and No. 43, "Through midnight gloom from Macedon," for "Foreign Missions." In addition the following are also in common use:— 1. Awake, 0 Lord, the zeal of those who stand. Intercession for the Clergy. In the Church Missionary Hymn Book, 1899. 2. England, by thine own Saint Alban. St. Alban. In C. W. A. Brooke's Additional Hymns, 1903. 3. Our God of love Who reigns above. For Children. Appeared in the Church Monthly, July 1899, and Hymns Ancient & Modern, 1904. --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology, New Supplement (1907)

Samuel Sebastian Wesley

1810 - 1876 Person Name: S. S. Wesley (1810-1876) Composer of "AURELIA" in Hymns for Today's Church (2nd ed.) Son of composer Samuel Wesley, and grandson of Methodist hymnwriter Charles Wesley.

Catherine Winkworth

1827 - 1878 Person Name: C. Winkworth, 1827-78 Translator of "Awake, Thou Spirit, Who Didst Fire" in Evangelical Lutheran Hymnary Catherine Winkworth is "the most gifted translator of any foreign sacred lyrics into our tongue, after Dr. Neale and John Wesley; and in practical services rendered, taking quality with quantity, the first of those who have laboured upon German hymns. Our knowledge of them is due to her more largely than to any or all other translators; and by her two series of Lyra Germanica, her Chorale Book, and her Christian Singers of Germany, she has laid all English-speaking Christians under lasting obligation." --Annotations of the Hymnal, Charles Hutchins, M.A., 1872 ======================== Winkworth, Catherine, daughter of Henry Winkworth, of Alderley Edge, Cheshire, was born in London, Sep. 13, 1829. Most of her early life was spent in the neighbourhood of Manchester. Subsequently she removed with the family to Clifton, near Bristol. She died suddenly of heart disease, at Monnetier, in Savoy, in July, 1878. Miss Winkworth published:— Translations from the German of the Life of Pastor Fliedner, the Founder of the Sisterhood of Protestant Deaconesses at Kaiserworth, 1861; and of the Life of Amelia Sieveking, 1863. Her sympathy with practical efforts for the benefit of women, and with a pure devotional life, as seen in these translations, received from her the most practical illustration possible in the deep and active interest which she took in educational work in connection with the Clifton Association for the Higher Education of Women, and kindred societies there and elsewhere. Our interest, however, is mainly centred in her hymnological work as embodied in her:— (1) Lyra Germanica, 1st Ser., 1855. (2) Lyra Germanica, 2nd Ser., 1858. (3) The Chorale Book for England (containing translations from the German, together with music), 1863; and (4) her charming biographical work, the Christian Singers of Germany, 1869. In a sympathetic article on Miss Winkworth in the Inquirer of July 20, 1878, Dr. Martineau says:— "The translations contained in these volumes are invariably faithful, and for the most part both terse and delicate; and an admirable art is applied to the management of complex and difficult versification. They have not quite the fire of John Wesley's versions of Moravian hymns, or the wonderful fusion and reproduction of thought which may be found in Coleridge. But if less flowing they are more conscientious than either, and attain a result as poetical as severe exactitude admits, being only a little short of ‘native music'" Dr. Percival, then Principal of Clifton College, also wrote concerning her (in the Bristol Times and Mirror), in July, 1878:— "She was a person of remarkable intellectual and social gifts, and very unusual attainments; but what specially distinguished her was her combination of rare ability and great knowledge with a certain tender and sympathetic refinement which constitutes the special charm of the true womanly character." Dr. Martineau (as above) says her religious life afforded "a happy example of the piety which the Church of England discipline may implant.....The fast hold she retained of her discipleship of Christ was no example of ‘feminine simplicity,' carrying on the childish mind into maturer years, but the clear allegiance of a firm mind, familiar with the pretensions of non-Christian schools, well able to test them, and undiverted by them from her first love." Miss Winkworth, although not the earliest of modern translators from the German into English, is certainly the foremost in rank and popularity. Her translations are the most widely used of any from that language, and have had more to do with the modern revival of the English use of German hymns than the versions of any other writer. -- John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907) ============================ See also in: Hymn Writers of the Church

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