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Ah, Holy Jesus

Author: Johann Heermann; Robert Bridges Meter: 11.11.11.5 Appears in 124 hymnals First Line: Ah, holy Jesus, how have you offended Lyrics: 1 Ah, holy Jesus, how have you offended, that mortal judgment has on you descended? By foes derided, by your own rejected, O most afflicted! 2 Who was the guilty? Who brought this upon you? It is my treason, Lord, that has slain you. And I, dear Jesus, I ... Topics: Year A Holy Saturday; Year B Holy Saturday; Year C Holy Saturday Scripture: John 18:15-17 Used With Tune: HERZLIEBSTER JESU
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O Thou Who through this holy week

Author: J. M. Neale Meter: 8.6.8.6 Appears in 53 hymnals First Line: O Thou, Who through this holy week Lyrics: 1 O Thou, Who through this holy week Didst suffer for us all; The sick to heal, the lost to seek, To raise up them that fall: 2 We cannot understand the woe Thy love was pleased to bear: O Lamb of God, we only know That all our hopes are there. 3 Thy feet ...

Holy Saturday

Appears in 628 hymnals Topics: Easter Triduum Holy Saturday

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HERZLIEBSTER JESU

Composer: Johann Crüger Meter: 11.11.11.5 Appears in 124 hymnals Tune Key: A Flat Major Incipit: 11175 12334 22345 Used With Text: Ah, Holy Jesus
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DOWN AT THE CROSS

Composer: John H. Stockton Meter: 9.9.9.5 with refrain Appears in 236 hymnals Tune Key: A Flat Major Incipit: 33211 76153 33553 Used With Text: Down at the Cross
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DUNCANNON

Composer: William J. Kirkpatrick Meter: 8.6.8.6 with refrain Appears in 76 hymnals Tune Key: D Major Incipit: 33211 44332 15323 Used With Text: Ruler of Life, We Crown You Now

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Ah, Holy Jesus

Author: Johann Heermann; Robert Bridges Hymnal: The New Century Hymnal #218 (1995) Meter: 11.11.11.5 First Line: Ah, holy Jesus, how have you offended Lyrics: 1 Ah, holy Jesus, how have you offended, that mortal judgment has on you descended? By foes derided, by your own rejected, O most afflicted! 2 Who was the guilty? Who brought this upon you? It is my treason, Lord, that has slain you. And I, dear Jesus, I ... Topics: Year A Holy Saturday; Year B Holy Saturday; Year C Holy Saturday Scripture: John 18:15-17 Languages: English Tune Title: HERZLIEBSTER JESU

Holy Saturday

Hymnal: Worship (3rd ed.) #817 (1986) Topics: Easter Triduum Holy Saturday

Holy Saturday (Sábado Santo)

Hymnal: Oramos Cantando = We Pray In Song #853 (2013)

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Robert Bridges

1844 - 1930 Paraphraser of "Ah, Holy Jesus" in The New Century Hymnal Robert S. Bridges (b. Walmer, Kent, England, 1844; d. Boar's Hill, Abingdon, Berkshire, England, 1930) In a modern listing of important poets Bridges' name is often omitted, but in his generation he was consid­ered a great poet and fine scholar. He studied medicine and practiced as a physician until 1881, when he moved to the village of Yattendon. He had already written some poetry, but after 1881 his literary career became a full-time occupation, and in 1913 he was awarded the position of poet laureate in England. Bridges published The Yattendon Hymnal (1899), a collection of one hundred hymns (forty-four written or translated by him with settings mainly from the Genevan psalter, arranged for unaccompanied singing. In addition to volumes of poetry, Bridges also published A Practical Discourse on Some Principles of Hymn-Singing (1899) and About Hymns (1911). Bert Polman =================== Bridges, Robert Seymour, M.A., son of J. J. Bridges, of Walmer, Kent, was b. Oct. 23, 1844, and educated at Eton and at Corpus Christi College, Oxford (B.A. 1867, M.A. 1874). He took his M.A. in 1874, but retired from practice in 1882, and now (1906) resides at Yattendon, Berks. He is the author of many poems and plays. He edition and contributed to the Yattendon Hymnal, 1899 (originally printed at the Oxford Univ. Press in parts—Nos. 1-25, 1895; 26-50, 1897; 51-75, 1898; 76-100, 1899). [Rev. James Mearns, M.A.] --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology, New Supplement (1907)

Johann Heermann

1585 - 1647 Author of "Ah, Holy Jesus" in The New Century Hymnal Johann Heermann's (b. Raudten, Silesia, Austria, 1585; d. Lissa, Posen [now Poland], 1647) own suffering and family tragedy led him to meditate on Christ's undeserved suffering. The only surviving child of a poor furrier and his wife, Heermann fulfilled his mother's vow at his birth that, if he lived, he would become a pastor. Initially a teacher, Heermann became a minister in the Lutheran Church in Koben in 1611 but had to stop preaching in 1634 due to a severe throat infection. He retired in 1638. Much of his ministry took place during the Thirty Years' War. At times he had to flee for his life and on several occasions lost all his possessions. Although Heermann wrote many of his hymns and poems during these devastating times, his personal faith and trust in God continued to be reflected in his lyrics. He is judged to be the finest hymn writer in the era between Martin Luther and Paul Gerhardt, one whose work marks a transition from the objective hymns of the Reformation to the more subjective hymns of the seventeenth century. His hymn texts were published in collections such as Devoti Musica Cordis, Hauss- und Hertz-Musica (1630, expanded in 1636, 1644), and Sontags- und Fest-evangelia (1636). Bert Polman =================== Heermann, Johann, son of Johannes Heermann, furrier at Baudten, near Wohlau, Silesia, was born at Baudten, Oct. 11, 1585. He was the fifth but only surviving child of his parents, and during a severe illness in his childhood his mother vowed that if he recovered she would educate him for the ministry, even though she had to beg the necessary money. He passed through the schools at Wohlau; at Fraustadt (where he lived in the house of Valerius Herberger, q. v., who took a great interest in him); the St. Elizabeth gymnasium at Breslau; and the gymnasium at Brieg. At Easter, 1609, he accompanied two young noblemen (sons of Baron Wenzel von Rothkirch), to whom he had been tutor at Brieg, to the University of Strassburg; but an affection of the eyes caused him to return to Baudten in 1610. At the recommendation of Baron Wenzel he was appointed diaconus of Koben, a small town on the Oder, not far from Baudten, and entered on his duties on Ascension Day, 1611, and on St. Martin's Day, 1611, was promoted to the pastorate there. After 1623 he suffered much from an affection of the throat, which compelled him to cease preaching in 1634, his place being supplied by assistants. In October, 1638, he retired to Lissa in Posen, and died there on Septuagesima Sunday (Feb. 17), 1647. (Koch, iii. 16-36; Allgemeine Deutsche Biographie, xi. 247-249, &c.) Much of Heermann's manhood was spent amid the distressing scenes of the Thirty Years' War; and by his own ill health and his domestic trials he was trained to write his beautiful hymns of “Cross and Consolation." Between 1629 and 1634, Koben was plundered four times by the Lichtenstein dragoons and the rough hordes under Wallenstein sent into Silesia by the King of Austria in order to bring about the Counter-Reformation and restore the Roman Catholic faith and practice; while in 1616 the town was devastated by fire, and in 1631 by pestilence. In these troublous years Heermann several times lost all his moveables; once he had to keep away from Koben for seventeen weeks; twice he was nearly sabred; and once, while crossing the Oder in a frail boat loaded almost to sinking, he heard the bullets of the pursuing soldiers whistle just over his head. He bore all with courage and patience, and he and his were wonderfully preserved from death and dishonour. He was thus well grounded in the school of affliction, and in his House and Heart Music some of his finest hymns are in the section entitled "Songs of Tears. In the time of the persecution and distress of pious Christians." As a hymnwriter Heermann ranks with the beat of his century, some indeed regarding him as second only to Gerhardt. He had begun writing Latin poems about 1605, and was crowned as a poet at Brieg on Oct. 8, 1608. He marks the transition from the objective standpoint of the hymnwriters of the Reformation period to the more subjective and experimental school that followed him. His hymns are distinguished by depth and tenderness of feeling; by firm faith and confidence in face of trial; by deep love to Christ, and humble submission to the will of God. Many of them became at once popular, passed into the hymnbooks, and still hold their place among the classics of German hymnody. They appeared principally in— (1) Devoti Musica Cordis. Hauss-und Hertz-Musica &c. Leipzig and Breslau, 1630, with 49 hymns (2nd edition 1636, with 64; 3rd edition 1644, with 69). The first section is entitled "Hymns of Penitence and Consolation from the words of the Ancient Fathers of the Church." Seven of these, however, have no mention in their individual titles of the sources from which they are derived; and the remainder are mostly based not on Latin hymns, but on the prose meditations in Martin Moller's Meditationes sanctorum patrum, or on the mediaeval compilations known as the Meditationes and the Manuale of St. Augustine. (2) Sontags-und Fest-Evangelia. Leipzig and Breslau, 1636, being hymns on the Gospels for Sundays and festivals. (3) Poetische Erquickstunden, Nürnberg, 1656; and its Fernere Fortsetzung, also Nürnberg, 1656 [both in Wernigerode], are poems rather than hymns. The hymns of the Hauss-und Hertz-Musica, with a representative selection from Heermann's other poetical works, were edited by C. E. P. Wackernagel, prefaced by a long biographical and critical introduction, and published at Stuttgart, 1855. Six of the most important of Heermann's hymns are annotated under their respective first lines. The other hymns by Heermann which have passed into English are :— I. Hymns in English common use:-- i. 0 Jesu, du mein Bräutigam. Holy Communion. In his Devoti Musica Cordis, Breslau, 1630, p. 78, in 12 stanzas of 4 lines. Thence in Mützell, 1858, No. 34, in Wackernagel's ed. of his Geistliche Lieder, No. 22, and the Unverfälschter Liedersegen, 1851, No. 283. Seems to be founded on Meditation xi. in the mediaeval compilation known as St. Augustine's Manuale. Translated as:— 0 Jesu, Lord, who once for me, a good translation of stanzas i., ii., iv., v., viii., by A. T. Russell, as No. 158 in his Psalms & Hymns, 1851. Other translations are: (l) 0 Jesu! Bridegroom of my Soul," by J. C. Jacobi, 1722, p. 44 (1732, p. 73). (2) "Dear Saviour, who for me hast borne," by Miss Dunn, 1857. ii. Rett, 0 Herr Jesu, rett dein Ehr. In Time of Trouble. A prayer for deliverance and peace for the Church. In his Devoti Musica Cordis, 1630, p. 119, in 5 stanzas of 4 lines, among the "Songs of Tears." Thence in Mützell, 1858, No. 48, in Wackernagel’s ed., No. 36, and the Unverfälschter Liedersegen, 1851, No. 245. Translated as:— Thine honour rescue, righteous Lord, in full, by Dr. M. Loy, in the Ohio Lutheran Hymnal, 1880. iii. Treuer Wächter Israel. In Time of War. 1630, p. 115, in 13 stanzas of 7 lines, among the "Songs of Tears." In Mützell, 1858, No. 47; in Wackernagel's edition, No. 35, and the Unverfälschter Liedersegen, 1851, No. 594. Lauxmann, in Koch, viii. 549, says of it:— "It is a powerful hymn filled with that prevailing prayer that takes heaven by force," and relates of st. vii.,11. v-7, "Eine Mauer um uns bau," that on Jan. 6, 1814, the Allied Forces were about to enter Schleswig. A poor widow with her daughter and grandson lived in a little house near the entrance of the town. The grandson was reading in his hymnbook those in time of war, and when he came to this said, “It would be a good thing, grandmother, if our Lord God would build a wall around us." Next day all through the town cries of distress were heard, but all was still before their door. On the following morning they had courage to open the door, and lo a snowdrift concealed them from the view of the enemy. On this incident Clemens Brentano composed a beautiful poem "Draus vor Schleswig." It is translated as:— Jesu! as a Saviour, aid. A good tr. of st; vii., viii., xiii., by A. T. Russell, as No. 138 in his Psalms & Hymns, 1851. iv. Zionklagt mit Angst und Schmerzen. Church of Christ. First published in his Devoti Musica Cordis, 2nd ed., 1636 (1644, p. 196), in 6 stanzas of 8 lines, entitled, "From the beautiful golden saying of Isaiah, Chapter xlix." In Mützell, 1858, No. 101, in Wackernagel’s ed., No. 53, and the Unverfälschter Liedersegen, 1851, No. 256. Translated as:— Sion bow'd with anguish weepeth A good translation of stanzas i., iii., v., by A. T. Russell, as No. 141 in his Psalms & Hymns, 1851. Another translation is: "Zion mourns in fear and anguish," by Miss Winkworth, 1869, p. 198. II. Hymns not in English common use:-- v. Ach Jesu! dessen Treu. Love to Christ. 1630, p. 144, in 33 stanzas. One of his finest hymns, full of deep love to Christ, but from its great length very little used in Germany. Translated as, "Ah! Jesus! Lord! whose faithfulness," by Miss Burlingham, in the British Herald, May, 1867, p. 72. vi. Der Tod klopft bei mir an. For the Dying. 1656, p. 22, in 121. Translated as, "That Death is at my door," by Miss Winkworth, 1869, p. 201. vii. Du weinest für Jerusalem. Christ weeping over Jerusalem. 1630, p. 81, in 6 stanzas, entitled, "On the Tears of Christ." Founded on St. Luke xix. 41-44, part of the Gospel for the 10 Sundays after Trinity. The translations are: (1) "With tears o'er lost Jerusalem," by Miss Cox, 1841, p. 159. (2) "Our Lord wept o'er Jerusalem," by Dr. H. Mills, 1845 (1856, p. 295). (3) "Thou weepest o'er Jerusalem," by Miss Winkworth, 1855,p. 70. viii. Herr Jesu Christe mein getreuer Hirte. Holy Communion. 1630, p. 74, in 9 stanzas, founded on M. Moller's Meditationes sanctorum patrum, pt. i. c. 11, and pt. v. c. 2. The translations are: (1) "Dear Saviour, Thou my faithful Shepherd, come” by Miss Dunn, 1857, p. 111. (2) "Lord Jesus Christ, my faithful Shepherd, hear," by Miss Winkworth, 1858, p. 93, repeated in Lyra Eucharistica, 1863-64. ix. Herr unser Gott, lass nicht zu Schanden werden. Christ's Church. 1630, p. 114, as one of the "Songs of Tears," in 5 stanzas. Translated as, "Ah! Lord our God, let them not be confounded," by Miss Winkworth, 1869, p. 197. x. Hilf mir, mein Oott, hilf dass nach dir. Christian Conduct. 1630, p. 32, in 7 stanzas, entitled, "For a better life. From the words of Augustine." Founded on No. i. of the Meditationes current under the name of St. Augustine. This meditation is apparently by St. Anselm of Canterbury. Translated as, "Lord, raise in me a constant Flame," by J. C. Jacobi, 1725, p. 27 (1732, p. 105). xi. Jesu, der du tausend Schmerzen. In Sickness. 1656, in the Fernere Fortsetzung, p. 79, in 12 lines, entitled, "In great bodily pain." Translated as, “Jesu, who didst stoop to prove," by Miss Winkworth, 1869, p. 200. xii. Jesu Tilger meiner Sünden. Lent. 1656, in the Fernere Fortsetzung, p. 1, in 10 lines, entitled, "For Victory in Temptation." Translated as, "Jesu, Victor over sin," by Miss Winkworth, 1869, p. 201. xiii. 0 Jesu, Jesu, Gottes Sohn. Love to Christ, 1630, p. 83, in 7 stanzas, entitled, “Of the Love, which a Christian heart bears to Christ, and will still bear." A beautiful expansion of his motto "Mihi omnia Jesus." The translations are: (1) "What causes me to mourn is this," a translation of stanza ii. by P. H. Molther, as No. 371, in the Moravian Hymn Book, 1789 (1886, No. 461). (2) "O Jesus, Jesus, Son of God," by Miss Burlingham, in the British Herald, Oct. 1865, p. 153, and in Reid's Praise Book, 1872. xiv. Treuer Gott ich muss dir klagen. In Trouble. 1630, p. 103, in 12 stanzas, entitled, "Hymn of a sorrowful heart for increase of faith." Translated as, "Faithful God! I lay before Thee," by J. C. Jacobi, 1720, p. 9(1722, p. 70; 1732, p. 117), and as No. 538 in pt. i. of the Moravian Hymn Book, 1754. xv. Wollt ihr euch nicht, o ihr frommen Christen. Second Advent. 1636, p. 210, in 9 stanzas, entitled, "On the day of the Holy Bishop Nicolaus. Gospel of Luke, 12 Chapter." Translated as: (l) "0 dear Christians, as 'tis needful, wou'd ye," as No. 153 in pt. i. of the Moravian Hymn Book, 1754. (2) “Help us, 0 Christ, to watch and pray," a tr. of st. ix. as st. iii. of No. 868 in the Moravian Hymn Book, 1789 (1849, No. 1221). xvi. Wo soll ich fliehen hin. Lent. 1630, p. 20, in 11 stanzas, entitled, "A hymn of consolation in which a troubled heart lays all its sins in true faith upon Christ. From Tauler." Based on M. Moller's Meditationes, vol. i. pt. i., No. 10. Translated as, "0 whither shall I fly," as No. 447 in pt. i. of the Moravian Hymn Book, 1754. In 1886, No. 279, it begins with "0 Jesus, source of Grace" (stanza ii.). [Rev. James Mearns, M.A.] --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907)

Johann Crüger

1598 - 1662 Composer of "HERZLIEBSTER JESU" in The New Century Hymnal Johann Crüger (b. Grossbriesen, near Guben, Prussia, Germany, 1598; d. Berlin, Germany, 1662) Crüger attended the Jesuit College at Olmutz and the Poets' School in Regensburg, and later studied theology at the University of Wittenberg. He moved to Berlin in 1615, where he published music for the rest of his life. In 1622 he became the Lutheran cantor at the St. Nicholas Church and a teacher for the Gray Cloister. He wrote music instruction manuals, the best known of which is Synopsis musica (1630), and tirelessly promoted congregational singing. With his tunes he often included elaborate accom­paniment for various instruments. Crüger's hymn collection, Neues vollkomliches Gesangbuch (1640), was one of the first hymnals to include figured bass accompaniment (musical shorthand) with the chorale melody rather than full harmonization written out. It included eighteen of Crüger's tunes. His next publication, Praxis Pietatis Melica (1644), is considered one of the most important collections of German hymnody in the seventeenth century. It was reprinted forty-four times in the following hundred years. Another of his publications, Geistliche Kirchen Melodien (1649), is a collection arranged for four voices, two descanting instruments, and keyboard and bass accompaniment. Crüger also published a complete psalter, Psalmodia sacra (1657), which included the Lobwasser translation set to all the Genevan tunes. Bert Polman =============================== Crüger, Johann, was born April 9, 1598, at Gross-Breese, near Guben, Brandenburg. After passing through the schools at Guben, Sorau and Breslau, the Jesuit College at Olmütz, and the Poets' school at Regensburg, he made a tour in Austria, and, in 1615, settled at Berlin. There, save for a short residence at the University of Wittenberg, in 1620, he employed himself as a private tutor till 1622. In 1622 he was appointed Cantor of St. Nicholas's Church at Berlin, and also one of the masters of the Greyfriars Gymnasium. He died at Berlin Feb. 23, 1662. Crüger wrote no hymns, although in some American hymnals he appears as "Johann Krüger, 1610,” as the author of the supposed original of C. Wesley's "Hearts of stone relent, relent" (q.v.). He was one of the most distinguished musicians of his time. Of his hymn tunes, which are generally noble and simple in style, some 20 are still in use, the best known probably being that to "Nun danket alle Gott" (q.v.), which is set to No. 379 in Hymns Ancient & Modern, ed. 1875. His claim to notice in this work is as editor and contributor to several of the most important German hymnological works of the 16th century, and these are most conveniently treated of under his name. (The principal authorities on his works are Dr. J. F. Bachmann's Zur Geschichte der Berliner Gesangbücher 1857; his Vortrag on P. Gerhard, 1863; and his edition of Gerhardt's Geistliche Lieder, 1866. Besides these there are the notices in Bode, and in R. Eitner's Monatshefte für Musik-Geschichte, 1873 and 1880). These works are:— 1. Newes vollkömmliches Gesangbuch, Augspur-gischer Confession, &c, Berlin, 1640 [Library of St. Nicholas's Church, Berlin], with 248 hymns, very few being published for the first time. 2. Praxis pietatis melica. Das ist: Ubung der Gottseligkeit in Christlichen und trostreichen Gesängen. The history of this, the most important work of the century, is still obscure. The 1st edition has been variously dated 1640 and 1644, while Crüger, in the preface to No. 3, says that the 3rd edition appeared in 1648. A considerable correspondence with German collectors and librarians has failed to bring to light any of the editions which Koch, iv. 102, 103, quotes as 1644, 1647, 1649, 1650, 1651, 1652, 1653. The imperfect edition noted below as probably that of 1648 is the earliest Berlin edition we have been able to find. The imperfect edition, probably ix. of 1659, formerly in the hands of Dr. Schneider of Schleswig [see Mützell, 1858, No. 264] was inaccessible. The earliest perfect Berlin edition we have found is 1653. The edition printed at Frankfurt in 1656 by Caspar Röteln was probably a reprint of a Berlin edition, c. 1656. The editions printed at Frankfurt-am-Main by B. C. Wust (of which the 1666 is in the preface described as the 3rd) are in considerable measure independent works. In the forty-five Berlin and over a dozen Frankfurt editions of this work many of the hymns of P. Gerhardt, J. Franck, P. J. Spener, and others, appear for the first time, and therein also appear many of the best melodies of the period. 3. Geistliche Kirchen-Melodien, &c, Leipzig, 1649 [Library of St. Katherine's Church, Brandenburg]. This contains the first stanzas only of 161 hymns, with music in four vocal and two instrumental parts. It is the earliest source of the first stanzas of various hymns by Gerhardt, Franck, &c. 4. D. M. Luther's und anderer vornehmen geisU reichen und gelehrten Manner Geistliche Lieder und Psalmen, &c, Berlin, 1653 [Hamburg Town Library], with 375 hymns. This was edited by C. Runge, the publisher, and to it Crüger contributed some 37 melodies. It was prepared at the request of Luise Henriette (q.v.), as a book for the joint use of the Lutherans and the Re¬formed, and is the earliest source of the hymns ascribed to her, and of the complete versions of many hymns by Gerhardt and Franck. 5. Psalmodia Sacra, &c, Berlin, 1658 [Royal Library, Berlin]. The first section of this work is in an ed. of A. Lobwasser's German Psalter; the second, with a similar title to No. 4, and the date 1657, is practically a recast of No. 4,146 of those in 1653 being omitted, and the rest of the 319 hymns principally taken from the Praxis of 1656 and the hymn-books of the Bohemian Brethren. New eds. appeared in 1676, 1700, 1704, 1711, and 1736. [Rev. James Mearns, M.A.] -- Excerpt from John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907) ======================= Crüger, Johann, p. 271, ii. Dr. J. Zahn, now of Neuendettelsau, in Bavaria, has recently acquired a copy of the 5th ed., Berlin, 1653, of the Praxis. --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology, Appendix, Part II (1907)



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