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Humility

Author: William G. Schell Meter: 8.6.8.6 D Appears in 5 hymnals First Line: Humility, thou secret vale Refrain First Line: Oh, make thy blest abode with me Lyrics: 1 Humility, thou secret vale, Unknown to ... soul shall never die. 2 Humility, how pure thy place! Thou ... And everlasting bliss! [Refrain] 3 Humility, how calm the breast That ... all the time. [Refrain] 4 Humility, thou shoreless sea Of perfect ... Scripture: Proverbs 22:4 Used With Tune: [Humility, thou secret vale] Text Sources: Timeless Truths (http://library.timelesstruths.org/music/Humility); Faith Publishing House, Evening Light Songs, 1949, edited 1987 (201); The Gospel Trumpet Company, Select Hymns, 1911 (374)

Clothe Yourself with Humility

Author: Susan Peterson Meter: 8.6.8.6 Appears in 1 hymnal Lyrics: 1. Clothe yourself with humility; Don’t try to take ...
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Beneath the cross of Jesus

Author: Elizabeth C. Clephane, 1830-1869 Appears in 448 hymnals Lyrics: 1 Beneath the cross of Jesus I fain would take my stand The shadow of a mighty rock Within a weary land. O blessed shelter from the storm, The sinner's sure retreat: O trysting-place, where heavenly love And heavenly justice meet. 2 There lies beyond its ... Topics: Humility Personal Used With Tune: ST. CHRISTOPHER

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HUMILITY

Meter: 8.7.8.7 D Appears in 76 hymnals Tune Sources: Arr. Tune Key: F Major Incipit: 33332 35322 55412 Used With Text: Sitting at the Feet of Jesus
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HUMILITY

Composer: John Goss Meter: 7.7.7.7 D Appears in 51 hymnals Tune Key: G Major Incipit: 12176 55124 33231 Used With Text: See in Yonder Manger Low

HUMILITY (MAINZER)

Composer: Joseph Mainzer, 1801-1851; E.R.B. Meter: 7.7.7.5 Appears in 1 hymnal Tune Key: A Major Incipit: 17123 21212 3432 Used With Text: Sweet the lesson Jesus taught

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Published text-tune combinations (hymns) from specific hymnals
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The Grace of Humility

Author: Clara McAlister Hymnal: Truth in Song #89 (1907) First Line: Clothed with sweet humility Refrain First Line: Humility! humility! Lyrics: 1 Clothed with sweet humility, Let me dwell, dear Lord, ... its waters cover me. Refrain: Humility! humility! Wondrous grace so rich and ... Topics: Humility Languages: English Tune Title: [Clothed with sweet humility]
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Sweet Humility

Author: Charles E. Orr Hymnal: Timeless Truths #709 Meter: 8.6.8.6 D First Line: Humility, O grace so sweet! Refrain First Line: Come softly from thy throne above Lyrics: ... , And scatter meekness there. 2 Humility, in Christ complete, I seek ... with longing prays. [Refrain] 3 Humility, the sweetest cup Of which ... within it sank. [Refrain] 4 Humility, O gift divine, Thine odors ... ] 6 O heaven’s grace—humility! Thy cherished charm I’ll ... Scripture: 1 Peter 5:5 Tune Title: [Humility, O grace so sweet]
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Humility

Author: William G. Schell Hymnal: Timeless Truths #847 Meter: 8.6.8.6 D First Line: Humility, thou secret vale Refrain First Line: Oh, make thy blest abode with me Lyrics: 1 Humility, thou secret vale, Unknown to ... soul shall never die. 2 Humility, how pure thy place! Thou ... And everlasting bliss! [Refrain] 3 Humility, how calm the breast That ... all the time. [Refrain] 4 Humility, thou shoreless sea Of perfect ... Scripture: Proverbs 22:4 Tune Title: [Humility, thou secret vale]

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Charles Wesley

1707 - 1788 Author of "For humility and protection" in Hymnal of the Methodist Episcopal Church Charles Wesley, M.A. was the great hymn-writer of the Wesley family, perhaps, taking quantity and quality into consideration, the great hymn-writer of all ages. Charles Wesley was the youngest son and 18th child of Samuel and Susanna Wesley, and was born at Epworth Rectory, Dec. 18, 1707. In 1716 he went to Westminster School, being provided with a home and board by his elder brother Samuel, then usher at the school, until 1721, when he was elected King's Scholar, and as such received his board and education free. In 1726 Charles Wesley was elected to a Westminster studentship at Christ Church, Oxford, where he took his degree in 1729, and became a college tutor. In the early part of the same year his religious impressions were much deepened, and he became one of the first band of "Oxford Methodists." In 1735 he went with his brother John to Georgia, as secretary to General Oglethorpe, having before he set out received Deacon's and Priest's Orders on two successive Sundays. His stay in Georgia was very short; he returned to England in 1736, and in 1737 came under the influence of Count Zinzendorf and the Moravians, especially of that remarkable man who had so large a share in moulding John Wesley's career, Peter Bonier, and also of a Mr. Bray, a brazier in Little Britain. On Whitsunday, 1737, he "found rest to his soul," and in 1738 he became curate to his friend, Mr. Stonehouse, Vicar of Islington, but the opposition of the churchwardens was so great that the Vicar consented that he "should preach in his church no more." Henceforth his work was identified with that of his brother John, and he became an indefatigable itinerant and field preacher. On April 8, 1749, he married Miss Sarah Gwynne. His marriage, unlike that of his brother John, was a most happy one; his wife was accustomed to accompany him on his evangelistic journeys, which were as frequent as ever until the year 1756," when he ceased to itinerate, and mainly devoted himself to the care of the Societies in London and Bristol. Bristol was his headquarters until 1771, when he removed with his family to London, and, besides attending to the Societies, devoted himself much, as he had done in his youth, to the spiritual care of prisoners in Newgate. He had long been troubled about the relations of Methodism to the Church of England, and strongly disapproved of his brother John's "ordinations." Wesley-like, he expressed his disapproval in the most outspoken fashion, but, as in the case of Samuel at an earlier period, the differences between the brothers never led to a breach of friendship. He died in London, March 29, 1788, and was buried in Marylebone churchyard. His brother John was deeply grieved because he would not consent to be interred in the burial-ground of the City Road Chapel, where he had prepared a grave for himself, but Charles said, "I have lived, and I die, in the Communion of the Church of England, and I will be buried in the yard of my parish church." Eight clergymen of the Church of England bore his pall. He had a large family, four of whom survived him; three sons, who all became distinguished in the musical world, and one daughter, who inherited some of her father's poetical genius. The widow and orphans were treated with the greatest kindness and generosity by John Wesley. As a hymn-writer Charles Wesley was unique. He is said to have written no less than 6500 hymns, and though, of course, in so vast a number some are of unequal merit, it is perfectly marvellous how many there are which rise to the highest degree of excellence. His feelings on every occasion of importance, whether private or public, found their best expression in a hymn. His own conversion, his own marriage, the earthquake panic, the rumours of an invasion from France, the defeat of Prince Charles Edward at Culloden, the Gordon riots, every Festival of the Christian Church, every doctrine of the Christian Faith, striking scenes in Scripture history, striking scenes which came within his own view, the deaths of friends as they passed away, one by one, before him, all furnished occasions for the exercise of his divine gift. Nor must we forget his hymns for little children, a branch of sacred poetry in which the mantle of Dr. Watts seems to have fallen upon him. It would be simply impossible within our space to enumerate even those of the hymns which have become really classical. The saying that a really good hymn is as rare an appearance as that of a comet is falsified by the work of Charles Wesley; for hymns, which are really good in every respect, flowed from his pen in quick succession, and death alone stopped the course of the perennial stream. It has been the common practice, however for a hundred years or more to ascribe all translations from the German to John Wesley, as he only of the two brothers knew that language; and to assign to Charles Wesley all the original hymns except such as are traceable to John Wesley through his Journals and other works. The list of 482 original hymns by John and Charles Wesley listed in this Dictionary of Hymnology have formed an important part of Methodist hymnody and show the enormous influence of the Wesleys on the English hymnody of the nineteenth century. -- Excerpts from John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907) ================== Charles Wesley, the son of Samuel Wesley, was born at Epworth, Dec. 18, 1707. He was educated at Westminster School and afterwards at Christ Church, Oxford, where he graduated M.A. In 1735, he took Orders and immediately proceeded with his brother John to Georgia, both being employed as missionaries of the S.P.G. He returned to England in 1736. For many years he engaged with his brother in preaching the Gospel. He died March 29, 1788. To Charles Wesley has been justly assigned the appellation of the "Bard of Methodism." His prominence in hymn writing may be judged from the fact that in the "Wesleyan Hymn Book," 623 of the 770 hymns were written by him; and he published more than thirty poetical works, written either by himself alone, or in conjunction with his brother. The number of his separate hymns is at least five thousand. --Annotations of the Hymnal, Charles Hutchins, M.A., 1872.

Chas. H. Gabriel

1856 - 1932 Composer of "[My heart's not haughty, Lord]" in Bible Songs Pseudonymns: C. D. Emerson, S. B. Jackson, Jennie Ree

D. S. Warner

1842 - 1895 Person Name: Daniel S. Warner Author of "Humility of Heart" in Timeless Truths Warner, Daniel Sidney. (near Marshallville, Wayne County, Ohio, 1842--1895). Church of God. Reared on an Ohio farm. During the Civil War, he substituted for a brother. Later he taught school. He attended Oberlin College briefly in 1865. By 1867 he was licensed to preach by the Western Ohio Eldership of the Church of God (Winebrennerian). His experience in preaching was gained on circuits in Nebraska and Ohio. In 1874 he was in trouble with the Eldership for preaching entire sanctification. Soon he joined the Indiana Eldership. In 1881 he was in trouble with this Eldership over sectism. Warner was an associate editor of the Herals of Gospel Freedom in 1878. this paper was merged with the Pilgrim about 1881, and the new paper was called the Gospel Trumpet, with Warner as its editor. Warner was forced to move the paper about, seeing for firm financial foundations. The publishing work was at last established in Grand Junction, Michigan, enabling Warner to travel more extensively with a group of evangelists. Warner's time was spent in editing the Trumpet, writing books, tracts, and songs, and making evangelistic tours of the United States. --John W.V. Smith, DNAH Archives =================================== Daniel Sidney Warner, 1842-1895 Born: June 25, 1842, Bris­tol (now Mar­shall­ville), Ohio. Died: De­cem­ber 12, 1895, Grand Junc­tion, Mi­chi­gan, of pneu­mon­ia. Buried: Near Grand Junc­tion, Mi­chi­gan, at the edge of the Church of God camp­ground that was once there. As of 1880, Warner was liv­ing in Rome Ci­ty, In­di­a­na. His works in­clude: Echoes From Glo­ry, with Bar­ney War­ren (Grand Junc­tion, Mi­chi­gan: The Gos­pel Trump­et Pub­lish­ing Com­pa­ny, 1893) Lyrics-- Ah Poor Ali­en Far from the Fold of Love Ah Poor Sin­ner, Think of Cal­va­ry All This World, Its Wealth and Hon­or All Ye People, Come Down to the Judg­ment Be­gun Along a Dark and Gloomy Path Are You of the Holy Rem­nant Are You Rea­dy, Wait­ing for the Lord? Are You Sow­ing Seeds of Kind­ness? Asleep in Je­sus, Oh, How Sweet A Gentle Hand Un­seen by Us A Long Time I Wan­dered Away Beautiful, Peace­ful Zi­on Behold a Form upon the Lone­ly Mount Behold, What Love, What Bound­less Love Bond of Per­fect­ness, The Borne Away in Mind and Spir­it Brighter Days Are Sweet­ly Dawn­ing By Thy Blessed Word Obey­ing Can the Spir­it of a Mor­tal Church of God, Thou Spot­less Vir­gin Church of the Liv­ing God Come, Be­hold the Love of Je­sus Come unto Me, All Ye That La­bor Come, With­in That Upper Cham­ber Dear Friends, We Have Pre­cious Tidings of Old Don’t Re­sist the Ho­ly Spirit Down into the Flow­ing Ri­ver Do You Tr­iumph, O My Bro­ther? Ere Christ Will Reign Within Thy Heart Fair C­ity of the Gos­pel Day Far Down o’er the Ag­es a Prom­ise Di­vine Fill Me with Thy Spir­it From My Soul and All With­in From the Mount of Heav­en­ly Vi­sion God Is Sit­ting in the Aw­ful Val­ley God Is Sweep­ing through the Na­tions God of Mer­cy, God of Love Great Peace Have They That Love Thy Law Hallelujah to Je­sus! Hark, in the Bi­ble a Warn­ing Hear the Tid­ings of a King­dom Hear the Voice of Our Com­mand­er Hear Ye the Moan of a Soul That Is Lost Here We Meet and Part in Je­sus His Yoke Is Ea­sy How Often I’ve Pondered My Struggles Within How Sweet Is My Walk with Je­sus! How Sweet This Bond of Per­fect­ness I Am Rest­ing in Je­sus, Hal­le­lu­jah! I Know My Name Is There I Heard the Dear Re­deem­er Say I Lost My Life for Je­sus on the Cross I Ought to Love My Sav­ior I Seem to Hear an An­gel Choir I Will Be with Thee, O, Child of Love I Will Part with Thee, Old Mas­ter I Will Trust Thee, O My Fa­ther If Thou Wilt Know the Foun­tain Deep I’ll Sing of a Ri­ver Di­vine In the Cham­bers of Thy Bo­som In the Light of God In the Morn­ing of the Lord Is the Spirit Glow­ing in Thy Heart? It Is Writ­ten in the Bi­ble I’ve Found a Friend in Je­sus I’ve Found My Lord and He Is Mine I’ve Reached the Land of Pure De­light Jesus Drank the Cup of Sor­row Jesus Has Taken My Load of Sin Jesus, Thou a Fount­ain Art Last Great Day, The Let Us Sing an In­vi­ta­tion Let Us Sing a Sweet Song of the Home of the Soul Let Us Sing the Name of Je­sus Life Is Not a Mys­tic Dream Light in Our Dark­ness, Bro­ther Lord Our Shep­herd, The Listen, Sin­ner, to the Voice Lord, the Shades of Night Lo, Heav­en Now Opens to Rap­tur­ous View Lo the King­dom of Hea­ven We See Lo, wisdom Crieth in the Streets Mansion Is Wai­ting in Glo­ry, A Men Speak of a Church Tri­umph­ant Mighty Mes­sen­gers Are Run­ning My Je­sus Died for Me up­on the Cross My Name Is in the Book of Life My Soul in Trou­ble Roamed My Soul Is Sa­tis­fied My Soul Is Saved from Sin Not in the Tem­ples Made with Hands Now My Pil­grim toils Are Over Now the Great King of Ba­bel O Blessed Je­sus, for Thee W Are Wait­ing O Blessed Je­sus, Thy Love Is Su­preme O Careless Sin­ner, Wake to Mer­cy’s Call O God, In­spire Our Morn­ing Hymn O How Can Any­one Re­fuse O How Sublime Is the Life of the Christ­ian O Let Us Sing the Mighty Love O Love Di­vine, Un­fa­thomed! O Praise the Lord, My Soul Is Saved O Precious Bi­ble! Burn­ing Words from Hea­ven O Sin­ner, Come Home to the Sav­ior O W Love the Child­ren’s Mee­ting O What Deep and Pure Com­pas­sion O Wor­ship God, the Fa­ther O Ye Pil­grims, Sing an Ex­hor­ta­tion O’er the Door of Hea­ven’s King­dom Oft My Heart Has Bled with Sor­row Oh, Wor­ship God the Fa­ther, Just and True Oh, Come and Praise the Lord To­day Oh, When We Re­mem­ber the Good­ness O Who Can Stand the Judg­ment Day Oh, Why Should I Be Lost Onward Moves the Great Eter­nal Our God Is Love, the An­gels Know Perishing Souls at Stake Tod­ay! Pilgrim of Je­sus, o’er Life’s Trou­bled Sea Praise the Lord with Songs of Glo­ry Rejoice, Little Ones, in the Pro­mise Di­vine River of Peace Salvation Is the Sweet­est Thing See the Great King of Ba­bel Shall I Tell You Why I Ceased from Fol­ly? Shall My Soul As­cend with Rap­ture Shield of Faith, The Since I Have Found My Sa­vior Sing of Salvation, O, it Was Love Sinner, will You Lose Your Soul Sunbeams Spark­ling and Glanc­ing Sweet Fellowship, Thy Crys­tal Tide Sweetly Whis­pered the Lord in My Mind Take the Shield of Faith, My Bro­ther Tell Me, Pil­grim, Traveling Home­ward Tell Me, Watch­man, Oh, What of the Morn­ing There Are Some Rays of Hope Di­vine There Are Tidings of a Land Far Away There Is a Blest Pa­vil­ion There Is a Grace Few Mor­tals Find There Is a Story I Oft­en Must Pon­der There Is Joy in the Ser­vice of the Mas­ter There Was a Bright and Love­ly Boy There’s an An­gel of Mer­cy from Hea­ven There’s a Fact No Mortal Ever Can Deny There’s a Fount­ain of Blood That Atones for the Soul There’s a Land of Ev­er­last­ing Song There’s a Peace­ful Valley of De­ci­sion Found There’s a Song We Love to Sing There’s an Awful Day That’s Com­ing There’s Mercy, Poor Sin­ner, for Thee There’s Mu­sic in My Soul This Is Why I Love My Sav­ior Tho’ All Along My Hap­py Pil­grim Race Time Enough, the Slug­gard Cries Time On­ward Flows Like a R­iver Vast Trusting in Je­sus, My Sa­vior and Friend ’Twas Sung by the Po­ets Two Little Hands Are Sweet­ly Fold­ed Unheeding Win­ter’s Cru­el Blast Un­i­verse Is God’s Do­main, The We Are Com­ing, Hal­le­lu­jah! We Are Going Home to Hea­ven’s Gold­en City We Are the Hap­py Child­ren We Have Met To­day on the Old Camp­ground We Have Reached an Aw­ful Era We Have Read in Sac­red Sto­ry We Stand upon the Sea of Glass We Tread up­on the Aw­ful Verge We Will Work for Je­sus We’ll Fol­low the Lord All the Way We’re a Hap­py Christ­ian Band What Awful Dark­ness Shrouds All the Earth! When Lost in the Dark­ness of Guilt and Despair When We Pass the Gold­en Sum­mer Where Art Thou, Wan­d’ring Sin­ner? Where Shall We Look for Help in Af­flict­ion? While Sleep­ing Care­less on the Brink Whiter Than Snow Who but the Christ­ian Is Hap­py and Free? Who Can Sing the Won­drous Love of the Son Di­vine?? Who Is My Life but Christ Alone? Who Will Suf­fer with the Sav­ior? Why Should a Doubt or Fear Arise? Why Should a Mor­tal Man Com­plain? Wonderful Fount­ain of Glo­ry --hymntime.com/tch

Hymnals

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Published hymn books and other collections

Small Church Music

Editors: Edward Caswall Description: The SmallChurchMusic site was commenced in 2006 grew out of the requests from those struggling to provide suitable music for their services and meetings. Rev. Clyde McLennan was ordained in mid 1960’s and was a pastor in many small Australian country areas, and therefore was acutely aware of this music problem. Having also been trained as a Pipe Organist, recordings on site (which are a subset of the smallchurchmusic.com site) are all actually played by Clyde, and also include piano and piano with organ versions. All recordings are in MP3 format. Churches all around the world use the recordings, with downloads averaging over 60,000 per month. The recordings normally have an introduction, several verses and a slowdown on the last verse. Users are encouraged to use software: Audacity (http://www.audacityteam.org) or Song Surgeon (http://songsurgeon.com) (see http://scm-audacity.weebly.com for more information) to adjust the MP3 number of verses, tempo and pitch to suit their local needs. Copyright notice: Rev. Clyde McLennan, performer in this collection, has assigned his performer rights in this collection to Hymnary.org. Non-commercial use of these recordings is permitted. For permission to use them for any other purposes, please contact manager@hymnary.org. Home/Music(smallchurchmusic.com) List SongsAlphabetically List Songsby Meter List Songs byTune Name About  

Christian Classics Ethereal Hymnary

Publication Date: 2007 Publisher: Grand Rapids, MI: Christian Classics Ethereal Library

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These are organ and solo trumpet pieces for the Lenten and Easter season. The folio contains a sepa…
Edward Caswell's familiar Christmas text is set to the hymn tune HUMILITY by John Goss. David Cherw…
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