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Ah, holy Jesus, how hast thou offended

Author: Johann Heermann; Robert Bridges Meter: 11.11.11.5 Appears in 120 hymnals Lyrics: ... upon thee? Alas, my treason, Jesus, hath undone thee! 'Twas ... 4 For me, kind Jesus, was thy incarnation, thy mortal sorrow, and ... thy life's oblation; thy death of ... salvation. 5 Therefore, kind Jesus, since I cannot pay thee ... Text Sources: Based on an 11th century Latin meditation
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All hail the power of Jesus' Name!

Author: Edward Perronet Meter: 8.6.8.6 Appears in 2,944 hymnals Lyrics: All hail the power of Jesus' Name! Let angels ... of David's line, Whom David, Lord did call The God incarnate ... ! Man divine! And crown Him Lord of all! ... And crown Him Lord of all! Sinners, whose love ... And crown Him Lord of all! Let every kindred, ... Topics: The Ascension Day; Parochial Missions Used With Tune: CORONATION
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O Word of God Incarnate

Author: William W. How Meter: 7.6.7.6 D Appears in 428 hymnals Lyrics: 1. O Word of God incarnate, O Wisdom from on ... unchanged, unchanging, O Light of our dark sky: we praise ... is the heaven-drawn picture of Christ, the living Word. ... dear Savior, a lamp of purest gold, to bear before ... nations your true light as of old. O teach your ... Topics: Jesus Christ Incarnation; The Book of the Church : Holy Scripture Used With Tune: MUNICH

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Heaven Shall Not Wait

Publication Date: 1989 Publisher: GIA Publications, Inc. Publication Place: Chicago Editors: John L. Bell

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HERZLIEBSTER JESU

Composer: Johann Crüger Meter: 11.11.11.5 Appears in 116 hymnals Tune Key: f minor Incipit: 11175 12334 22345 Used With Text: Ah, Holy Jesus, How Have You Offended
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DIX

Composer: Conrad Kocher Meter: 7.7.7.7.7.7 Appears in 376 hymnals Tune Key: G Major Incipit: 17121 44367 16555 Used With Text: God of Mercy, God of Grace
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CORONATION

Composer: Oliver Holden Meter: 8.6.8.6 Appears in 450 hymnals Tune Key: G Major Incipit: 51133 31232 13212 Used With Text: All hail the power of Jesus' Name!

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Sweet the Time, Exceeding Sweet

Author: George Burder, 1752-1832 Hymnal: Hymns of the Saints #4 (1982) Topics: Incarnation Scripture: John 4:23-24 Tune Title: HENDON
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Ah, holy Jesus, how hast thou offended

Author: Robert Bridges, 1844-1930; J. Heerman, 1585-1647 Hymnal: Complete Anglican Hymns Old and New #5 (2000) Lyrics: 1 Ah, holy Jesus, how hast thou offended, that ... me, kind Jesu, was thy incarnation, thy mortal sorrow, and thy ... life's oblation; thy death of anguish and thy bitter passion ... Topics: Year A Palm Sunday: Liturgy of the Passion Scripture: 1 Peter 2:24 Languages: English Tune Title: HERZLIDBSTER JESU
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All hail the power of Jesus' name!

Author: E. Perronet, 1779 Hymnal: The Lutheran Hymnary #6 (1913) Lyrics: 1 All hail the power of Jesus' name! Let angels prostrate fall; ... ; The God incarnate, Man divine: And crown Him Lord of all! The ... God incarnate, Man divine, And ... crown Him Lord of all! 4 ... Topics: Jesus Christ Our King Tune Title: [All hail the power of Jesus' name!]

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Johann Heermann

1585 - 1657 Author of "Ah, Holy Jesus, How Have You Offended" in Psalter Hymnal (Gray) Heermann, Johann, son of Johannes Heermann, furrier at Baudten, near Wohlau, Silesia, was born at Baudten, Oct. 11, 1585. He was the fifth but only surviving child of his parents, and during a severe illness in his childhood his mother vowed that if he recovered she would educate him for the ministry, even though she had to beg the necessary money. He passed through the schools at Wohlau; at Fraustadt (where he lived in the house of Valerius Herberger, q. v., who took a great interest in him); the St. Elizabeth gymnasium at Breslau; and the gymnasium at Brieg. At Easter, 1609, he accompanied two young noblemen (sons of Baron Wenzel von Rothkirch), to whom he had been tutor at Brieg, to the University of Strassburg; but an affection of the eyes caused him to return to Baudten in 1610. At the recommendation of Baron Wenzel he was appointed diaconus of Koben, a small town on the Oder, not far from Baudten, and entered on his duties on Ascension Day, 1611, and on St. Martin's Day, 1611, was promoted to the pastorate there. After 1623 he suffered much from an affection of the throat, which compelled him to cease preaching in 1634, his place being supplied by assistants. In October, 1638, he retired to Lissa in Posen, and died there on Septuagesima Sunday (Feb. 17), 1647. (Koch, iii. 16-36; Allgemeine Deutsche Biographie, xi. 247-249, &c.) Much of Heermann's manhood was spent amid the distressing scenes of the Thirty Years' War; and by his own ill health and his domestic trials he was trained to write his beautiful hymns of “Cross and Consolation." Between 1629 and 1634, Koben was plundered four times by the Lichtenstein dragoons and the rough hordes under Wallenstein sent into Silesia by the King of Austria in order to bring about the Counter-Reformation and restore the Roman Catholic faith and practice; while in 1616 the town was devastated by fire, and in 1631 by pestilence. In these troublous years Heermann several times lost all his moveables; once he had to keep away from Koben for seventeen weeks; twice he was nearly sabred; and once, while crossing the Oder in a frail boat loaded almost to sinking, he heard the bullets of the pursuing soldiers whistle just over his head. He bore all with courage and patience, and he and his were wonderfully preserved from death and dishonour. He was thus well grounded in the school of affliction, and in his House and Heart Music some of his finest hymns are in the section entitled "Songs of Tears. In the time of the persecution and distress of pious Christians." As a hymnwriter Heermann ranks with the beat of his century, some indeed regarding him as second only to Gerhardt. He had begun writing Latin poems about 1605, and was crowned as a poet at Brieg on Oct. 8, 1608. He marks the transition from the objective standpoint of the hymnwriters of the Reformation period to the more subjective and experimental school that followed him. His hymns are distinguished by depth and tenderness of feeling; by firm faith and confidence in face of trial; by deep love to Christ, and humble submission to the will of God. Many of them became at once popular, passed into the hymnbooks, and still hold their place among the classics of German hymnody. They appeared principally in— (1) Devoti Musica Cordis. Hauss-und Hertz-Musica &c. Leipzig and Breslau, 1630, with 49 hymns (2nd edition 1636, with 64; 3rd edition 1644, with 69). The first section is entitled "Hymns of Penitence and Consolation from the words of the Ancient Fathers of the Church." Seven of these, however, have no mention in their individual titles of the sources from which they are derived; and the remainder are mostly based not on Latin hymns, but on the prose meditations in Martin Moller's Meditationes sanctorum patrum, or on the mediaeval compilations known as the Meditationes and the Manuale of St. Augustine. (2) Sontags-und Fest-Evangelia. Leipzig and Breslau, 1636, being hymns on the Gospels for Sundays and festivals. (3) Poetische Erquickstunden, Nürnberg, 1656; and its Fernere Fortsetzung, also Nürnberg, 1656 [both in Wernigerode], are poems rather than hymns. The hymns of the Hauss-und Hertz-Musica, with a representative selection from Heermann's other poetical works, were edited by C. E. P. Wackernagel, prefaced by a long biographical and critical introduction, and published at Stuttgart, 1855. Six of the most important of Heermann's hymns are annotated under their respective first lines. The other hymns by Heermann which have passed into English are :— I. Hymns in English common use:-- i. 0 Jesu, du mein Bräutigam. Holy Communion. In his Devoti Musica Cordis, Breslau, 1630, p. 78, in 12 stanzas of 4 lines. Thence in Mützell, 1858, No. 34, in Wackernagel's ed. of his Geistliche Lieder, No. 22, and the Unverfälschter Liedersegen, 1851, No. 283. Seems to be founded on Meditation xi. in the mediaeval compilation known as St. Augustine's Manuale. Translated as:— 0 Jesu, Lord, who once for me, a good translation of stanzas i., ii., iv., v., viii., by A. T. Russell, as No. 158 in his Psalms & Hymns, 1851. Other translations are: (l) 0 Jesu! Bridegroom of my Soul," by J. C. Jacobi, 1722, p. 44 (1732, p. 73). (2) "Dear Saviour, who for me hast borne," by Miss Dunn, 1857. ii. Rett, 0 Herr Jesu, rett dein Ehr. In Time of Trouble. A prayer for deliverance and peace for the Church. In his Devoti Musica Cordis, 1630, p. 119, in 5 stanzas of 4 lines, among the "Songs of Tears." Thence in Mützell, 1858, No. 48, in Wackernagel’s ed., No. 36, and the Unverfälschter Liedersegen, 1851, No. 245. Translated as:— Thine honour rescue, righteous Lord, in full, by Dr. M. Loy, in the Ohio Lutheran Hymnal, 1880. iii. Treuer Wächter Israel. In Time of War. 1630, p. 115, in 13 stanzas of 7 lines, among the "Songs of Tears." In Mützell, 1858, No. 47; in Wackernagel's edition, No. 35, and the Unverfälschter Liedersegen, 1851, No. 594. Lauxmann, in Koch, viii. 549, says of it:— "It is a powerful hymn filled with that prevailing prayer that takes heaven by force," and relates of st. vii.,11. v-7, "Eine Mauer um uns bau," that on Jan. 6, 1814, the Allied Forces were about to enter Schleswig. A poor widow with her daughter and grandson lived in a little house near the entrance of the town. The grandson was reading in his hymnbook those in time of war, and when he came to this said, “It would be a good thing, grandmother, if our Lord God would build a wall around us." Next day all through the town cries of distress were heard, but all was still before their door. On the following morning they had courage to open the door, and lo a snowdrift concealed them from the view of the enemy. On this incident Clemens Brentano composed a beautiful poem "Draus vor Schleswig." It is translated as:— Jesu! as a Saviour, aid. A good tr. of st; vii., viii., xiii., by A. T. Russell, as No. 138 in his Psalms & Hymns, 1851. iv. Zionklagt mit Angst und Schmerzen. Church of Christ. First published in his Devoti Musica Cordis, 2nd ed., 1636 (1644, p. 196), in 6 stanzas of 8 lines, entitled, "From the beautiful golden saying of Isaiah, Chapter xlix." In Mützell, 1858, No. 101, in Wackernagel’s ed., No. 53, and the Unverfälschter Liedersegen, 1851, No. 256. Translated as:— Sion bow'd with anguish weepeth A good translation of stanzas i., iii., v., by A. T. Russell, as No. 141 in his Psalms & Hymns, 1851. Another translation is: "Zion mourns in fear and anguish," by Miss Winkworth, 1869, p. 198. II. Hymns not in English common use:-- v. Ach Jesu! dessen Treu. Love to Christ. 1630, p. 144, in 33 stanzas. One of his finest hymns, full of deep love to Christ, but from its great length very little used in Germany. Translated as, "Ah! Jesus! Lord! whose faithfulness," by Miss Burlingham, in the British Herald, May, 1867, p. 72. vi. Der Tod klopft bei mir an. For the Dying. 1656, p. 22, in 121. Translated as, "That Death is at my door," by Miss Winkworth, 1869, p. 201. vii. Du weinest für Jerusalem. Christ weeping over Jerusalem. 1630, p. 81, in 6 stanzas, entitled, "On the Tears of Christ." Founded on St. Luke xix. 41-44, part of the Gospel for the 10 Sundays after Trinity. The translations are: (1) "With tears o'er lost Jerusalem," by Miss Cox, 1841, p. 159. (2) "Our Lord wept o'er Jerusalem," by Dr. H. Mills, 1845 (1856, p. 295). (3) "Thou weepest o'er Jerusalem," by Miss Winkworth, 1855,p. 70. viii. Herr Jesu Christe mein getreuer Hirte. Holy Communion. 1630, p. 74, in 9 stanzas, founded on M. Moller's Meditationes sanctorum patrum, pt. i. c. 11, and pt. v. c. 2. The translations are: (1) "Dear Saviour, Thou my faithful Shepherd, come” by Miss Dunn, 1857, p. 111. (2) "Lord Jesus Christ, my faithful Shepherd, hear," by Miss Winkworth, 1858, p. 93, repeated in Lyra Eucharistica, 1863-64. ix. Herr unser Gott, lass nicht zu Schanden werden. Christ's Church. 1630, p. 114, as one of the "Songs of Tears," in 5 stanzas. Translated as, "Ah! Lord our God, let them not be confounded," by Miss Winkworth, 1869, p. 197. x. Hilf mir, mein Oott, hilf dass nach dir. Christian Conduct. 1630, p. 32, in 7 stanzas, entitled, "For a better life. From the words of Augustine." Founded on No. i. of the Meditationes current under the name of St. Augustine. This meditation is apparently by St. Anselm of Canterbury. Translated as, "Lord, raise in me a constant Flame," by J. C. Jacobi, 1725, p. 27 (1732, p. 105). xi. Jesu, der du tausend Schmerzen. In Sickness. 1656, in the Fernere Fortsetzung, p. 79, in 12 lines, entitled, "In great bodily pain." Translated as, “Jesu, who didst stoop to prove," by Miss Winkworth, 1869, p. 200. xii. Jesu Tilger meiner Sünden. Lent. 1656, in the Fernere Fortsetzung, p. 1, in 10 lines, entitled, "For Victory in Temptation." Translated as, "Jesu, Victor over sin," by Miss Winkworth, 1869, p. 201. xiii. 0 Jesu, Jesu, Gottes Sohn. Love to Christ, 1630, p. 83, in 7 stanzas, entitled, “Of the Love, which a Christian heart bears to Christ, and will still bear." A beautiful expansion of his motto "Mihi omnia Jesus." The translations are: (1) "What causes me to mourn is this," a translation of stanza ii. by P. H. Molther, as No. 371, in the Moravian Hymn Book, 1789 (1886, No. 461). (2) "O Jesus, Jesus, Son of God," by Miss Burlingham, in the British Herald, Oct. 1865, p. 153, and in Reid's Praise Book, 1872. xiv. Treuer Gott ich muss dir klagen. In Trouble. 1630, p. 103, in 12 stanzas, entitled, "Hymn of a sorrowful heart for increase of faith." Translated as, "Faithful God! I lay before Thee," by J. C. Jacobi, 1720, p. 9(1722, p. 70; 1732, p. 117), and as No. 538 in pt. i. of the Moravian Hymn Book, 1754. xv. Wollt ihr euch nicht, o ihr frommen Christen. Second Advent. 1636, p. 210, in 9 stanzas, entitled, "On the day of the Holy Bishop Nicolaus. Gospel of Luke, 12 Chapter." Translated as: (l) "0 dear Christians, as 'tis needful, wou'd ye," as No. 153 in pt. i. of the Moravian Hymn Book, 1754. (2) “Help us, 0 Christ, to watch and pray," a tr. of st. ix. as st. iii. of No. 868 in the Moravian Hymn Book, 1789 (1849, No. 1221). xvi. Wo soll ich fliehen hin. Lent. 1630, p. 20, in 11 stanzas, entitled, "A hymn of consolation in which a troubled heart lays all its sins in true faith upon Christ. From Tauler." Based on M. Moller's Meditationes, vol. i. pt. i., No. 10. Translated as, "0 whither shall I fly," as No. 447 in pt. i. of the Moravian Hymn Book, 1754. In 1886, No. 279, it begins with "0 Jesus, source of Grace" (stanza ii.). [Rev. James Mearns, M.A.] --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907)

Henry Francis Lyte

1793 - 1847 Person Name: Henry F. Lyte Author of "God of Mercy, God of Grace" in Psalms for All Seasons Lyte, Henry Francis, M.A., son of Captain Thomas Lyte, was born at Ednam, near Kelso, June 1, 1793, and educated at Portora (the Royal School of Enniskillen), and at Trinity College, Dublin, of which he was a Scholar, and where he graduated in 1814. During his University course he distinguished himself by gaining the English prize poem on three occasions. At one time he had intended studying Medicine; but this he abandoned for Theology, and took Holy Orders in 1815, his first curacy being in the neighbourhood of Wexford. In 1817, he removed to Marazion, in Cornwall. There, in 1818, he underwent a great spiritual change, which shaped and influenced the whole of his after life, the immediate cause being the illness and death of a brother clergyman. Lyte says of him:— "He died happy under the belief that though he had deeply erred, there was One whose death and sufferings would atone for his delinquencies, and be accepted for all that he had incurred;" and concerning himself he adds:— "I was greatly affected by the whole matter, and brought to look at life and its issue with a different eye than before; and I began to study my Bible, and preach in another manner than I had previously done." From Marazion he removed, in 1819, to Lymington, where he composed his Tales on the Lord's Prayer in verse (pub. in 1826); and in 1823 he was appointed Perpetual Curate of Lower Brixham, Devon. That appointment he held until his death, on Nov. 20, 1847. His Poems of Henry Vaughan, with a Memoir, were published in 1846. His own Poetical works were:— (1) Poems chiefly Religious 1833; 2nd ed. enlarged, 1845. (2) The Spirit of the Psalms, 1834, written in the first instance for use in his own Church at Lower Brixham, and enlarged in 1836; (3) Miscellaneous Poems (posthumously) in 1868. This last is a reprint of the 1845 ed. of his Poems, with "Abide with me" added. (4) Remains, 1850. Lyte's Poems have been somewhat freely drawn upon by hymnal compilers; but by far the larger portion of his hymns found in modern collections are from his Spirit of the Psalms. In America his hymns are very popular. In many instances, however, through mistaking Miss Auber's (q. v.) Spirit of the Psalms, 1829, for his, he is credited with more than is his due. The Andover Sabbath Hymn Book, 1858, is specially at fault in this respect. The best known and most widely used of his compositions are "Abide with me, fast falls the eventide;” “Far from my heavenly home;" "God of mercy, God of grace;" "Pleasant are Thy courts above;" "Praise, my soul, the King of heaven;" and "There is a safe and secret place." These and several others are annotated under their respective first lines: the rest in common use are:— i. From his Poems chiefly Religious, 1833 and 1845. 1. Above me hangs the silent sky. For Use at Sea. 2. Again, 0 Lord, I ope mine eyes. Morning. 3. Hail to another Year. New Year. 4. How good, how faithful, Lord, art Thou. Divine care of Men. 5. In tears and trials we must sow (1845). Sorrow followed by Joy. 6. My [our] rest is in heaven, my [our] rest is not here. Heaven our Home. 7. 0 Lord, how infinite Thy love. The Love of God in Christ. 8. Omniscient God, Thine eye divine. The Holy Ghost Omniscient. 9. The leaves around me falling. Autumn. 10. The Lord hath builded for Himself. The Universe the Temple of God. 11. Vain were all our toil and labour. Success is of God. 12. When at Thy footstool, Lord, I bend. Lent. 13. When earthly joys glide swift away. Ps. cii. 14. Wilt Thou return to me, O Lord. Lent. 15. With joy we hail the sacred day. Sunday. ii. From his Spirit of the Psalms, 1834. 16. Be merciful to us, O God. Ps. lvii. 17. Blest is the man who knows the Lord. Ps. cxii. 18. Blest is the man whose spirit shares. Ps. xli. 19. From depths of woe to God I cry. Ps. cxxxx. 20. Gently, gently lay Thy rod. Ps. vi. 21. Glorious Shepherd of the sheep. Ps. xxiii. 22. Glory and praise to Jehovah on high. Ps. xxix. 23. God in His Church is known. Ps. lxxvi. 24. God is our Refuge, tried and proved. Ps. xlvi. 25. Great Source of my being. Ps. lxxiii. 26. Hear, O Lord, our supplication. Ps. lxiv. 27. How blest the man who fears the Lord. Ps.cxxviii. 28. Humble, Lord, my haughty spirit. Ps. cxxxi. 29. In this wide, weary world of care. Ps. cxxxii. 30. In vain the powers of darkness try. Ps.lii. 31. Jehovah speaks, let man be awed. Ps. xlix. 32. Judge me, O Lord, and try my heart. Ps. xxvi. 33. Judge me, O Lord, to Thee I fly. Ps. xliii. 34. Lord, I have sinned, but O forgive. Ps. xli. 35. Lord, my God, in Thee I trust. Ps. vii. 36. Lord of the realms above, Our Prophet, &c. Ps.xlv. 37. Lone amidst the dead and dying. Ps. lxii. 38. Lord God of my salvation. Ps. lxxxviii. 39. Lord, I look to Thee for all. Ps. xxxi. 40. Lord, I would stand with thoughtful eye. Ps. lxix. 41. Lord, my God, in Thee I trust. Ps. vii. 42. My God, my King, Thy praise I sing. Ps. cviii. 43. My God, what monuments I see. Ps. xxxvi. 44. My spirit on [to] Thy care. Ps. xxxi. 45. My trust is in the Lord. Ps. xi. 46. Not unto us, Almighty Lord [God]. Ps. cxv. 47. O God of glory, God of grace. Ps. xc. 48. O God of love, how blest are they. Ps. xxxvii. 49. O God of love, my God Thou art. Ps. lxiii. 50. O God of truth and grace. Ps. xviii. 51. O had I, my Saviour, the wings of a dove. Ps. lv. 52. O how blest the congregation. Ps. lxxxix. 53. O how safe and [how] happy he. Ps. xci. 54. O plead my cause, my Saviour plead. Ps. xxxv. 55. O praise the Lord, 'tis sweet to raise. Ps. cxlvii. 56. O praise the Lord; ye nations, pour. Ps. cxvii. 57. O praise ye the Lord With heart, &c. Ps. cxlix. 58. O that the Lord's salvation. Ps. xiv. 59. O Thou Whom thoughtless men condemn. Ps. xxxvi. 60. Of every earthly stay bereft. Ps. lxxiv. 61. Our hearts shall praise Thee, God of love. Ps. cxxxviii. 62. Pilgrims here on earth and strangers. Ps. xvi. 63. Praise for Thee, Lord, in Zion waits. Ps. lxv. 64. Praise to God on high be given. Ps. cxxxiv. 65. Praise ye the Lord, His servants, raise. Ps. cxiii. 66. Redeem'd from guilt, redeem'd from fears. Ps. cxvi. 67. Save me by Thy glorious name. Ps. liv. 68. Shout, ye people, clap your hands. Ps. xlvii. 69. Sing to the Lord our might. Ps. lxxxi. 70. Strangers and pilgrims here below. Ps. cix. 71. Sweet is the solemn voice that calls. Ps. cxxii. 72. The Church of God below. Ps. lxxxvii. 73. The Lord is King, let earth be glad. Ps. xcvii. 74. The Lord is on His throne. Ps. xciii. 75. The Lord is our Refuge, the Lord is our Guide. Ps. xlvii. 76. The mercies of my God and King. Ps. lxxxix. 77. The Lord Who died on earth for men. Ps. xxi. 78. Tis a pleasant thing to fee. Ps. cxxxiii. 79. Thy promise, Lord, is perfect peace. Ps. iii. 80. Unto Thee I lift mine [my] eyes. Ps. cxxiii. 81. Whom shall [should] we love like Thee? Ps. xviii. Lyte's versions of the Psalms are criticised where their sadness, tenderness and beauty are set forth. His hymns in the Poems are characterized by the same features, and rarely swell out into joy and gladness. --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907) ================== Lyte, Henry Francis, p. 706, i. Additional versions of Psalms are in common use:-- 1. Lord, a thousand foes surround us. Psalms lix. 2. Praise, Lord, for Thee in Zion waits. Psalms lxv. 3. The Christian like his Lord of old. Psalms cxl. 4. The Lord of all my Shepherd is. Psalms xxiii. 5. The Lord of heaven to earth is come. Psalms xcviii. 6. Thy mercy, Lord, the sinner's hope. Psalms xxxvi. 7. To Thee, O Lord, in deep distress. Psalms cxlii. Sometimes given as "To God I turned in wild distress." 8. Uphold me, Lord, too prone to stray. Psalms i. 9. When Jesus to our [my] rescue came. Psalms cxxvi. These versions appeared in the 1st edition of Lyte's Spirit of the Psalms, 1834. It must be noted that the texts of the 1834, the 1836, and the 3rd ed., 1858, vary considerably, but Lyte was not responsible for the alterations and omissions in the last, which was edited by another hand for use at St. Mark's, Torquay. Lyte's version of Psalms xxix., "Glory and praise to Jehovah on high" (p. 706, ii., 22), first appeared in his Poems, 1st ed., 1833, p. 25. Read also No. 39 as "Lord, I look for all to Thee." --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology, Appendix, Part II (1907)

Edward Perronet

1721 - 1792 Author of "All hail the power of Jesus' Name!" in The Hymnal Edward Perronet was the son of the Rev. Vincent Perronet, Vicar of Shoreham, Kent. For some time he was an intimate associate of the Wesleys, at Canterbury and Norwich. He afterwards became pastor of a dissenting congregation. He died in 1792. In 1784, he published a small volume, entitled "Occasional Verses, Moral and Social;" a book now extremely rare. At his death he is said to have left a large sum of money to Shrubsole, who was organist at Spafield's Chapel, London, and who had composed the tune "Miles Lane" for "All hail the power of Jesus' Name!" --Annotations of the Hymnal, Charles Hutchins, M.A. 1872. ------ Perronet, Edward. The Perronets of England, grandfather, father, and son, were French emigres. David Perronet came to England about 1680. He was son of the refugee Pasteur Perronet, who had chosen Switzerland as his adopted country, where he ministered to a Protestant congregation at Chateau D'Oex. His son, Vincent Perronet, M.A., was a graduate of Queen's College, Oxford, though his name is not found in either Anthony Woods's Athenae Oxonienses nor his Fasti, nor in Bliss's apparatus of additional notes. He became, in 1728, Vicar of Shoreham, Kent. He is imperishably associated with the Evangelical Revival under the Wesleys and Whitefield. He cordially cooperated with the movement, and many are the notices of him scattered up and down the biographies and Journals of John Wesley and of Selina, Countess of Huntingdon. He lived to the venerable age of ninety-one; and pathetic and beautiful is the account of John Wesley's later visits to the white-haired saint (b. 1693, d. May 9, 1785).* His son Edward was born in 1726. He was first educated at home under a tutor, but whether he proceeded to the University (Oxford) is uncertain. Born, baptized, and brought up in the Church of England, he had originally no other thought than to be one of her clergy. But, though strongly evangelical, he had a keen and searching eye for defects. A characteristic note to The Mitre, in referring to a book called The Dissenting Gentleman's answer to the Rev. Mr. White, thus runs:—"I was born, and am like to die, in the tottering communion of the Church of England; but I despise her nonsense; and thank God that I have once read a book that no fool can answer, and that no honest man will". The publication of The Mitre is really the first prominent event in his life. A copy is preserved in the British Museum, with title in the author's holograph, and manuscript notes; and on the fly-leaf this:— "Capt. Boisragon, from his oblig'd and most respectful humble servt. The Author. London, March 29th, 1757." The title is as follows:— The Mitre; a Sacred Poem (1 Samuel ii. 30). London: printed in the year 1757. This strangely overlooked satire is priceless as a reflex of contemporary ecclesiastical opinion and sentiment. It is pungent, salted with wit, gleams with humour, hits off vividly the well-known celebrities in Church and State, and is well wrought in picked and packed words. But it is a curious production to have come from a "true son" of the Church of England. It roused John Wesley's hottest anger. He demanded its instant suppression; and it was suppressed (Atmore's Methodist Memorial, p. 300, and Tyerman, ii. 240-44, 264, 265); and yet it was at this period the author threw himself into the Wesleys' great work. But evidences abound in the letters and journals of John Wesley that he was intermittently rebellious and vehement to even his revered leader's authority. Earlier, Edward Perronet dared all obloquy as a Methodist. In 1749 Wesley enters in his diary: "From Rochdale went to Bolton, and soon found that the Rochdale lions were lambs in comparison with those of Bolton. Edward Perronet was thrown down and rolled in mud and mire. Stones were hurled and windows broken" (Tyerman's Life and Times of the Rev. John Wesley, M.A., 3 vols., 1870 ; vol. ii. 57). In 1750 John Wesley writes: ”Charles and you [Edward Perronet] behave as I want you to do; but you cannot, or will not, preach where I desire. Others can and will preach where I desire, but they do not behave as I want them to do. I have a fine time between the one and the other. I think Charles and you have in the general a right sense of what it is to serve as sons in the gospel; and if all our helpers had had the same, the work of God would have prospered better both in England and Ireland. I have not one preacher with me, and not six in England, whose wills are broken to serve me" (ibid. ii. 85, and Whitehead's Life of Wesley, ii. 259). In 1755 arrangements to meet the emergency created by its own success had to be made for Methodism. As one result, both Edward and Charles Perronet broke loose from John Wesley's law that none of his preachers or "helpers" were to dispense the Sacraments, but were still with their flocks to attend the parish churches. Edward Perronet asserted his right to administer the Sacraments as a divinely-called preacher ibid. ii. 200). At that time he was resident at Canterbury, "in a part of the archbishop's old palace" (ibid. ii. 230. In season and out of season he "evangelized." Onward, he became one of the Countess of Huntingdon's "ministers" in a chapel in Watling Street, Canterbury. Throughout he was passionate, impulsive, strong-willed; but always lived near his divine Master. The student-reader of Lives of the Wesleys will be "taken captive" by those passages that ever and anon introduce him. He bursts in full of fire and enthusiasm, yet ebullient and volatile. In the close of his life he is found as an Independent or Congregational pastor of a small church in Canterbury. He must have been in easy worldly circumstances, as his will shows. He died Jan. 2, 1792, and was buried in the cloisters of the great cathedral, Jan. 8. His Hymns were published anonymously in successive small volumes. First of all came Select Passages of the Old and New Testament versified; London: Printed by H. Cock, mdcclvi. … A second similar volume is entitled A Small Collection of Hymns, &c, Canterbury: printed in the year dcclxxxii. His most important volume was the following:— Occasional Verses, moral and sacred. Published for the instruction and amusement of the Candidly Serious and Religious. London, printed for the Editor: And Sold by J. Buckland in Paternoster Row; and T. Scollick, in the City Road, Moorfields, mdcclxxxv. pp. 216 (12°). [The British Museum copy has the two earlier volumes bound up with this.] The third hymn in this scarce book is headed, “On the Resurrection," and is, ”All hail the power of Jesus' name". But there are others of almost equal power and of more thorough workmanship. In my judgment, "The Lord is King" (Psalm xcvi. 16) is a great and noble hymn. It commences:— “Hail, holy, holy, holy Loud! Let Pow'rs immortal sing; Adore the co-eternal Word, And shout, the Lord is King." Very fine also is "The Master's Yoke—the Scholar's Lesson," Matthew xi. 29, which thus opens:— O Grant me, Lord, that sweet content That sweetens every state; Which no internal fears can rent, Nor outward foes abate." A sacred poem is named "The Wayfaring Man: a Parody"; and another, "The Goldfish: a Parody." The latter has one splendid line on the Cross, "I long to share the glorious shame." "The Tempest" is striking, and ought to be introduced into our hymnals; and also "The Conflict or Conquest over the Conqueror, Genesis xxxii. 24". Still finer is "Thoughts on Hebrews xii.," opening:— "Awake my soul—arise! And run the heavenly race; Look up to Him who holds the prize, And offers thee His grace." "A Prayer for Mercy on Psalm cxix. 94," is very striking. On Isaiah lxv. 19, is strong and unmistakable. "The Sinner's Resolution," and "Thoughts on Matthew viii. 2," and on Mark x. 51, more than worthy of being reclaimed for use. Perronet is a poet as well as a pre-eminently successful hymnwriter. He always sings as well as prays. It may be added that the brief paraphrase after Ovid given below, seems to echo the well-known lines in Gray's immortal elegy:— "How many a gem unseen of human eyes, Entomb'd in earth, a sparkling embryo lies; How many a rose, neglected as the gem, Scatters its sweets and rots upon its stem: So many a mind, that might a meteor shone, Had or its genius or its friend been known; Whose want of aid from some maternal hand, Still haunts the shade, or quits its native land." [Rev. A. B. Grosart, D.D., LL.D.] * Agnew's Protestant Exiles from France in the Reign of Louis XIV. confounds Vincent the father with Edward his son. -- John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907)



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