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My Hope Is Built on Nothing Less

Author: Edward Mote, 1797-1874 Meter: 8.8.8.8.8.8 Appears in 946 hymnals Lyrics: 1 My hope is built on nothing less Than Jesus' blood and righteousness; I dare to make no other claim But wholly lean on Jesus' name. On Christ, the solid rock, I stand; All other ground is sinking sand. 2 When darkness veils his lovely face, I rest on his ... Topics: Justification; Justification Used With Tune: MAGDALEN
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Rock of Ages, Cleft for Me

Author: Augustus M. Toplady, 1740-78 Meter: 7.7.7.7.7.7 Appears in 2,555 hymnals Lyrics: 1 Rock of Ages, cleft for me, Let me hide myself in thee; Let the water and the blood From thy riven side which flowed Be of sin the double cure: Cleanse me from its guilt and pow'r. 2 Not the labors of my hands Can fulfill thy law's demands. Could my zeal ... Topics: Justification; Justification Used With Tune: TOPLADY
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To God Be the Glory

Author: Fanny J. Crosby, 1820-1915 Meter: 11.11.11.11 with refrain Appears in 180 hymnals First Line: To God be the glory, great things he has done! Refrain First Line: Praise the Lord! Praise the Lord! Lyrics: 1 To God be the glory; great things he has done! He so loved the world that he gave us his Son, Who yielded his life an atonement for sin And opened the life-gate that all may go in. Praise the Lord! Praise the Lord! Let the earth hear his voice! Refrain: ... Topics: Justification; Justification Used With Tune: TO GOD BE THE GLORY

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JUSTIFICATION

Composer: J. Eagleton Meter: 8.8.8.8 Appears in 7 hymnals Incipit: 55555 67111 17564
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SOLID ROCK

Composer: William B. Bradbury Meter: 8.8.8.8 with refrain Appears in 226 hymnals Tune Key: F Major Incipit: 51353 32234 44217 Used With Text: My Hope Is Built on Nothing Less
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NEW BRITAIN

Meter: 8.6.8.6 Appears in 248 hymnals Tune Sources: Columbian Harmony , Cincinnati, 1829, alt. Tune Key: F Major Incipit: 51313 21655 13132 Used With Text: Amazing Grace--How Sweet the Sound

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Repentance and Free Pardon; or, Justification and Sanctification

Hymnal: Doctor Watts's imitation of the Psalms of David, to which is added a collection of hymns; the whole applied to the state of the Christian Church in general (3rd ed.) #56b (1786) First Line: Blest is the man, forever blest Lyrics: 1 Blest is the man, forever blest, Whose guilt is pardon'd by his God, Whose sins with sorrow are confess'd, And cover'd with his Saviour's blood. 2 Before his judgment seat the Lord No more permits his crimes to rise; He pleads no merit of reward, And not ... Topics: Justification free; Justification free Scripture: Psalm 32 Languages: English
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Repentance and Free Pardon; or, Justification and Sanctification

Hymnal: Doctor Watts's Imitation of the Psalms of David #56b (1790) First Line: Blest is the man, forever blest Lyrics: 1 Blest is the man, forever blest, Whose guilt is pardon'd by his God, Whose sins with sorrow are confess'd, And cover'd with his Saviour's blood. 2 Before his judgment seat the Lord Nor more permits his crimes to rise; He pleads no merit of reward, And ... Topics: Justification free; Justification free Scripture: Psalm 32 Languages: English
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Repentance and Free Pardon; or, Justification and Sanctification

Hymnal: Doctor Watts's Imitation of the Psalms of David, corrected and enlarged, to which is added a collection of hymns; the whole applied to the state of the Christian Church in general (2nd ed.) #61b (1786) First Line: Blest is the man, forever blest Lyrics: 1 Blest is the man, forever blest, Whose guilt is pardon'd by his God, Whose sins with sorrow are confess'd, And cover'd with his Saviour's blood. 2 Before his judgement seat the Lord No more permits his crimes to rise; He pleads no merit of reward, And ... Topics: Justification free; Justification free Scripture: Psalm 32 Languages: English

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John Wesley

1703 - 1791 Person Name: John B. Wesley, 1703-91 Translator of "Jesus, Your Blood and Righteousness" in Christian Worship John Wesley, the son of Samuel, and brother of Charles Wesley, was born at Epworth, June 17, 1703. He was educated at the Charterhouse, London, and at Christ Church, Oxford. He became a Fellow of Lincoln College, Oxford, and graduated M.A. in 1726. At Oxford, he was one of the small band consisting of George Whitefield, Hames Hervey, Charles Wesley, and a few others, who were even then known for their piety; they were deridingly called "Methodists." After his ordination he went, in 1735, on a mission to Georgia. The mission was not successful, and he returned to England in 1738. From that time, his life was one of great labour, preaching the Gospel, and publishing his commentaries and other theological works. He died in London, in 1791, in his eighty-eighth year. His prose works are very numerous, but he did not write many useful hymns. It is to him, however, and not to his brother Charles, that we are indebted for the translations from the German. --Annotations of the Hymnal, Charles Hutchins, M.A., 1872 ====================== John Wesley, M.A., was born at Epworth Rectory in 1703, and, like the rest of the family, received his early education from his mother. He narrowly escaped perishing in the fire which destroyed the rectory house in 1709, and his deliverance made a life-long impression upon him. In 1714 he was nominated on the foundation of Charterhouse by his father's patron, the Duke of Buckingham, and remained at that school until 1720, when he went up, with a scholarship, from Charterhouse to Christ Church, Oxford. Having taken his degree, he received Holy Orders from the Bishop of Oxford (Dr. Potter) in 1725. In 1726 he was elected Fellow of Lincoln College, and remained at Oxford until 1727, when he returned into Lincolnshire to assist his father as curate at Epworth and Wroot. In 1729 he was summoned back to Oxford by his firm friend, Dr. Morley, Rector of Lincoln, to assist in the College tuition. There he found already established the little band of "Oxford Methodists" who immediately placed themselves under his direction. In 1735 he went, as a Missionary of the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel, to Georgia, where a new colony had been founded under the governorship of General Oglethorpe. On his voyage out he was deeply impressed with the piety and Christian courage of some German fellow travellers, Moravians. During his short ministry in Georgia he met with many discouragements, and returned home saddened and dissatisfied both with himself and his work; but in London he again fell in with the Moravians, especially with Peter Bohler; and one memorable night (May 24, 1738) he went to a meeting in Aldersgate Street, where some one was reading Luther's preface to the Epistle to the Romans. There, "About a quarter before nine, while he was describing the change which God works in the heart through faith in Christ, I felt my heart strangely warmed. I felt I did trust in Christ, Christ alone, for salvation; and an assurance was given me, that He had taken away my sins, even mine, and saved me from the law of sin and death." From that moment his future course was sealed; and for more than half a century he laboured, through evil report and good report, to spread what he believed to be the everlasting Gospel, travelling more miles, preaching more sermons, publishing more books of a practical sort, and making more converts than any man of his day, or perhaps of any day, and dying at last, March 2, 1791, in harness, at the patriarchal age of 88. The popular conception of the division of labour between the two brothers in the Revival, is that John was the preacher, and Charles the hymnwriter. But this is not strictly accurate. On the one hand Charles was also a great preacher, second only to his brother and George Whitefield in the effects which he produced. On the other hand, John by no means relegated to Charles the exclusive task of supplying the people with their hymns. John Wesley was not the sort of man to depute any part of his work entirely to another: and this part was, in his opinion, one of vital importance. With that wonderful instinct for gauging the popular mind, which was one element in his success, he saw at once that hymns might be utilized, not only for raising the devotion, but also for instructing, and establishing the faith of his disciples. He intended the hymns to be not merely a constituent part of public worship, but also a kind of creed in verse. They were to be "a body of experimental and practical divinity." "In what other publication," he asks in his Preface to the Wesleyan Hymn Book, 1780 (Preface, Oct. 20,1779), "have you so distinct and full an account of Scriptural Christianity; such a declaration of the heights and depths of religion, speculative and practical; so strong cautions against the most plausible errors, particularly those now most prevalent; and so clear directions for making your calling and election sure; for perfecting holiness in the fear of God?" The part which he actually took in writing the hymns, it is not easy to ascertain; but it is certain that more than thirty translations from the German, French and Spanish (chiefly from the German) were exclusively his; and there are some original hymns, admittedly his composition, which are not unworthy to stand by the side of his brother's. His translations from the German especially have had a wide circulation. Although somewhat free as translations they embody the fire and energy of the originals. It has been the common practice, however for a hundred years or more to ascribe all translations from the German to John Wesley, as he only of the two brothers knew that language; and to assign to Charles Wesley all the original hymns except such as are traceable to John Wesley through his Journals and other works. The list of 482 original hymns by John and Charles Wesley listed in this Dictionary of Hymnology have formed an important part of Methodist hymnody and show the enormous influence of the Wesleys on the English hymnody of the nineteenth century. -- Excerpts from John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907) =================== See also in: Hymn Writers of the Church

Charlotte Elliott

1789 - 1871 Person Name: Charlotte Elliott, 1789-1871 Author of "Just as I Am, without One Plea" in Lutheran Book of Worship Elliott, Charlotte, daughter of Charles Elliott, of Clapham and Brighton, and granddaughter of the Rev. H. Venn, of Huddersfield, was born March 18, 1789. The first 32 years of her life were spent mostly at Clapham. In 1823 she removed to Brighton, and died there Sept. 22, 1871. To her acquaintance with Dr. C. Malan, of Geneva, is attributed much of the deep spiritual-mindedness which is so prominent in her hymns. Though weak and feeble in body, she possessed a strong imagination, and a well-cultured and intellectual mind. Her love of poetry and music was great, and is reflected in her verse. Her hymns number about 150, a large percentage of which are in common use. The finest and most widely known of these are, "Just as I am” and "My God, my Father, while I stray." Her verse is characterized by tenderness of feeling, plaintive simplicity, deep devotion, and perfect rhythm. For those in sickness and sorrow she has sung as few others have done. Her hymns appeared in her brother's Psalms & Hymns and elsewhere as follows:— (1) Psalms and Hymns for Public, Private, and Social Worship; selected by the Rev. H. V. Elliott, &c., 1835-48. In this Selection her signature is "C. E." (2) The Christian Remembrancer Pocket Book. This was originally edited by Miss Kiernan, of Dublin. Miss Elliott undertook the editorship in 1834. (3) The Invalid's Hymn Book. This was originally compiled by Miss Kiernan, but before publication was re-arranged by Miss Elliott, who also added 23 hymns in the first edition., 1834. These were increased in the following edition to the sixth in 1854, when her contributions amounted to 112. From that date no change was made in the work. (4) Hours of Sorrow Cheered and Comforted; or, Thoughts in Verse, 1836. (5) Morning and Evening Hymns for a Week, printed privately in 1839 for sale for a benevolent institution in Brighton, and published in 1842. (6) Thoughts in Verse on Sacred Subjects, 1869. Miss Elliott's Poems were published, with a Memoir by her sister, Mrs. Babington, in 1873, and an additional volume of Leaves from her unpublished Journals and Poems, also appeared in 1870. In addition to her more important hymns, which are annotated under their respective first lines, there are in common use:— i. From The Invalid's Hymn-book, 1834-1841:— 1. Clouds and darkness round about thee. (1841.) Resignation. 2. Not willingly dost Thou afflict [reject]. (1841.) Divine Chastisement. 3. 0 God, may I look up to Thee. (1841.) Teach us to Pray. 4. This is enough; although 'twere sweet. (1834.) On being debarred from Divine Worship. 5. With tearful eyes I look around. (1841.) The Invitation "Come Unto Me." ii. From H. V. Elliott's Psalms & Hymns, 1835-1839:— 6. Glorious was that primal light. Christmas. 7. Hail, holy day, most blest, most dear. Easter. 8. My only Saviour, when I feel. Jesus His people's Rest. 9. Now let our heavenly plants and flowers. Monday Morning. 10. The Sabbath-day has reached its close. Sunday Evening. iii. From Miss Elliott's Hours of Sorrow, 1836:— 11. Father, when Thy child is dying. Prayer for a Departing Spirit. 12. Leaning on Thee, my Guide, my Friend. Death Anticipated. 13. My God, is any hour so sweet? The Hour of Prayer. 14. 0 faint and feeble-hearted. Resignation enforced. 15. There is a holy sacrifice. The Contrite Heart. iv. From her Hymns for a Week, 1839:— 16. Guard well thy lips; none, none can know. Thursday Morning. 17. There is a spot of consecrated ground. Pt. i. 18. This is the mount where Christ's disciples see. Pt. ii. Monday Evening. 19. This is the day to tune with care. Saturday Morning. v. From Thoughts in Verse on Sacred Subjects, 1869:— 20. As the new moons of old were given. On a Birthday. 21. I need no other plea. Pt. i. 22. I need no prayers to saints. Pt. ii. Christ, All in All. 23. Jesus, my Saviour, look on me. Christ, All in All. Several of the earlier of these hymns were repeated in the later works, and are thus sometimes attributed to the wrong work. [Rev. James Davidson, B.A.] -- John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907) ================ Elliott, Charlotte, p. 328, i. Other hymns are:— 1. O how I long to reach my home. Heaven desired. From the Invalid's Hymn Book, 1834. 2. The dawn approaches, golden streaks. Second Advent. From Thoughts in Verse, &c, 1869. Of her hymns noted on p. 328, Nos. 6, 7, 8, 9, 10,11, and 13, all appeared in the 1st edition of Elliott's Psalms & Hymns, 1835. --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology, Appendix, Part II (1907) ======================== Elliott, Charlotte, pp. 328, i.; 1561, ii. Further research enables us to give amended dates to some of her hymns as follows:— 1. With tearful eyes I look around (No. 5). This is in the 1835 Appendix to The Invalid's Hymn Book. 2. My only Saviour, when I feel (No. 8). Also in the 1835 Appendix. 3. Father, when Thy child is dying (No. 11). In the 1833 Appendix. 4. I want that adorning divine, p. 559, i. In the Christian Remembrancer 1848, p. 22. --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology, New Supplement (1907)

John Newton

1725 - 1807 Person Name: John Newton, 1725-1807 Author (st. 1-3) of "Amazing Grace--How Sweet the Sound" in Christian Worship Newton, John, who was born in London, July 24, 1725, and died there Dec. 21, 1807, occupied an unique position among the founders of the Evangelical School, due as much to the romance of his young life and the striking history of his conversion, as to his force of character. His mother, a pious Dissenter, stored his childish mind with Scripture, but died when he was seven years old. At the age of eleven, after two years' schooling, during which he learned the rudiments of Latin, he went to sea with his father. His life at sea teems with wonderful escapes, vivid dreams, and sailor recklessness. He grew into an abandoned and godless sailor. The religious fits of his boyhood changed into settled infidelity, through the study of Shaftesbury and the instruction of one of his comrades. Disappointing repeatedly the plans of his father, he was flogged as a deserter from the navy, and for fifteen months lived, half-starved and ill-treated, in abject degradation under a slave-dealer in Africa. The one restraining influence of his life was his faithful love for his future wife, Mary Catlett, formed when he was seventeen, and she only in her fourteenth year. A chance reading of Thomas à Kempis sowed the seed of his conversion; which quickened under the awful contemplations of a night spent in steering a water-logged vessel in the face of apparent death (1748). He was then twenty-three. The six following years, during which he commanded a slave ship, matured his Christian belief. Nine years more, spent chiefly at Liverpool, in intercourse with Whitefield, Wesley, and Nonconformists, in the study of Hebrew and Greek, in exercises of devotion and occasional preaching among the Dissenters, elapsed before his ordination to the curacy of Olney, Bucks (1764). The Olney period was the most fruitful of his life. His zeal in pastoral visiting, preaching and prayer-meetings was unwearied. He formed his lifelong friendship with Cowper, and became the spiritual father of Scott the commentator. At Olney his best works—-Omicron's Letters (1774); Olney Hymns (1779); Cardiphonia, written from Olney, though published 1781—were composed. As rector of St. Mary Woolnoth, London, in the centre of the Evangelical movement (1780-1807) his zeal was as ardent as before. In 1805, when no longer able to read his text, his reply when pressed to discontinue preaching, was, "What, shall the old African blasphemer stop while he can speak!" The story of his sins and his conversion, published by himself, and the subject of lifelong allusion, was the base of his influence; but it would have been little but for the vigour of his mind (shown even in Africa by his reading Euclid drawing its figures on the sand), his warm heart, candour, tolerance, and piety. These qualities gained him the friendship of Hannah More, Cecil, Wilberforce, and others; and his renown as a guide in experimental religion made him the centre of a host of inquirers, with whom he maintained patient, loving, and generally judicious correspondence, of which a monument remains in the often beautiful letters of Cardiphonia. As a hymnwriter, Montgomery says that he was distanced by Cowper. But Lord Selborne's contrast of the "manliness" of Newton and the "tenderness" of Cowper is far juster. A comparison of the hymns of both in The Book of Praise will show no great inequality between them. Amid much that is bald, tame, and matter-of-fact, his rich acquaintance with Scripture, knowledge of the heart, directness and force, and a certain sailor imagination, tell strongly. The one splendid hymn of praise, "Glorious things of thee are spoken," in the Olney collection, is his. "One there is above all others" has a depth of realizing love, sustained excellence of expression, and ease of development. "How sweet the name of Jesus sounds" is in Scriptural richness superior, and in structure, cadence, and almost tenderness, equal to Cowper's "Oh! for a closer walk with God." The most characteristic hymns are those which depict in the language of intense humiliation his mourning for the abiding sins of his regenerate life, and the sense of the withdrawal of God's face, coincident with the never-failing conviction of acceptance in The Beloved. The feeling may be seen in the speeches, writings, and diaries of his whole life. [Rev. H. Leigh Bennett, M.A.] A large number of Newton's hymns have some personal history connected with them, or were associated with circumstances of importance. These are annotated under their respective first lines. Of the rest, the known history of which is confined to the fact that they appeared in the Olney Hymns, 1779, the following are in common use:— 1. Be still, my heart, these anxious cares. Conflict. 2. Begone, unbelief, my Saviour is near. Trust. 3. By the poor widow's oil and meal. Providence. 4. Chief Shepherd of Thy chosen sheep. On behalf of Ministers. 5. Darkness overspreads us here. Hope. 6. Does the Gospel-word proclaim. Rest in Christ. 7. Fix my heart and eyes on Thine. True Happiness. 8. From Egypt lately freed. The Pilgrim's Song. 9. He Who on earth as man was Known. Christ the Rock. 10. How blest are they to whom the Lord. Gospel Privileges. 11. How blest the righteous are. Death of the Righteous. 12. How lost was my [our] condition. Christ the Physician. 13. How tedious and tasteless the hours. Fellowship with Christ. 14. How welcome to the saints [soul] when pressed. Sunday. 15. Hungry, and faint, and poor. Before Sermon. 16. In mercy, not in wrath, rebuke. Pleading for Mercy. 17. In themselves, as weak as worms. Power of Prayer. 18. Incarnate God, the soul that knows. The Believer's Safety. 19. Jesus, Who bought us with His blood. The God of Israel. "Teach us, 0 Lord, aright to plead," is from this hymn. 20. Joy is a [the] fruit that will not grow. Joy. 21. Let hearts and tongues unite. Close of the Year. From this "Now, through another year," is taken. 22. Let us adore the grace that seeks. New Year. 23. Mary to her [the] Saviour's tomb. Easter. 24. Mercy, 0 Thou Son of David. Blind Bartimeus. 25. My harp untun'd and laid aside. Hoping for a Revival. From this "While I to grief my soul gave way" is taken. 26. Nay, I cannot let thee go. Prayer. Sometimes, "Lord, I cannot let Thee go." 27. Now may He Who from the dead. After Sermon. 28. 0 happy they who know the Lord, With whom He deigns to dwell. Gospel Privilege. 29. O Lord, how vile am I. Lent. 30. On man in His own Image made. Adam. 31. 0 speak that gracious word again. Peace through Pardon. 32. Our Lord, Who knows full well. The Importunate Widow. Sometimes altered to "Jesus, Who knows full well," and again, "The Lord, Who truly knows." 33. Physician of my sin-sick soul. Lent. 34. Pleasing spring again is here. Spring. 35. Poor, weak, and worthless, though I am. Jesus the Friend. 36. Prepare a thankful song. Praise to Jesus. 37. Refreshed by the bread and wine. Holy Communion. Sometimes given as "Refreshed by sacred bread and wine." 38. Rejoice, believer, in the Lord. Sometimes “Let us rejoice in Christ the Lord." Perseverance. 39. Salvation, what a glorious plan. Salvation. 40. Saviour, shine and cheer my soul. Trust in Jesus. The cento "Once I thought my mountain strong," is from this hymn. 41. Saviour, visit Thy plantation. Prayer for the Church. 42. See another year [week] is gone. Uncertainty of Life. 43. See the corn again in ear. Harvest. 44. Sinner, art thou still secure? Preparation for the Future. 45. Sinners, hear the [thy] Saviour's call. Invitation. 46. Sovereign grace has power alone. The two Malefactors. 47. Stop, poor sinner, stop and think. Caution and Alarm. 48. Sweeter sounds than music knows. Christmas. 49. Sweet was the time when first I felt. Joy in Believing. 50. Ten thousand talents once I owed. Forgiveness and Peace. 51. The grass and flowers, which clothe the field. Hay-time. 52. The peace which God alone reveals. Close of Service. 53. Thy promise, Lord, and Thy command. Before Sermon. 54. Time, by moments, steals away. The New Year. 55. To Thee our wants are known. Close of Divine Service. 56. We seek a rest beyond the skies. Heaven anticipated. 57. When any turn from Zion's way. Jesus only. 58. When Israel, by divine command. God, the Guide and Sustainer of Life. 59. With Israel's God who can compare? After Sermon. 60. Yes, since God Himself has said it. Confidence. 61. Zion, the city of our God. Journeying Zionward. -- John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907) ================= Newton, J., p. 803, i. Another hymn in common use from the Olney Hymns, 1779, is "Let me dwell on Golgotha" (Holy Communion). --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology, Appendix, Part II (1907) ----- John Newton was born in London, July 24, 1725. His mother died when he was seven years old. In his eleventh year he accompanied his father, a sea captain, on a voyage. For several years his life was one of dissipation and crime. He was disgraced while in the navy. Afterwards he engaged in the slave trade. Returning to England in 1748, the vessel was nearly wrecked in a storm. This peril forced solemn reflection upon him, and from that time he was a changed man. It was six years, however, before he relinquished the slave trade, which was not then regarded as an unlawful occupation. But in 1754, he gave up sea-faring life, and holding some favourable civil position, began also religious work. In 1764, in his thirty-ninth year, he entered upon a regular ministry as the Curate of Olney. In this position he had intimate intercourse with Cowper, and with him produced the "Olney Hymns." In 1779, Newton became Rector of S. Mary Woolnoth, in London, in which position he became more widely known. It was here he died, Dec. 21, 1807, His published works are quite numerous, consisting of sermons, letters, devotional aids, and hymns. He calls his hymns "The fruit and expression of his own experience." --Annotations of the Hymnal, Charles Hutchins, M.A. 1872 See also in: Hymn Writers of the Church =======================

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Small Church Music

Editors: Isaac Watts Description: The SmallChurchMusic site was commenced in 2006 grew out of the requests from those struggling to provide suitable music for their services and meetings. Rev. Clyde McLennan was ordained in mid 1960’s and was a pastor in many small Australian country areas, and therefore was acutely aware of this music problem. Having also been trained as a Pipe Organist, recordings on site (which are a subset of the smallchurchmusic.com site) are all actually played by Clyde, and also include piano and piano with organ versions. All recordings are in MP3 format. Churches all around the world use the recordings, with downloads averaging over 60,000 per month. The recordings normally have an introduction, several verses and a slowdown on the last verse. Users are encouraged to use software: Audacity (http://www.audacityteam.org) or Song Surgeon (http://songsurgeon.com) (see http://scm-audacity.weebly.com for more information) to adjust the MP3 number of verses, tempo and pitch to suit their local needs. Copyright notice: Rev. Clyde McLennan, performer in this collection, has assigned his performer rights in this collection to Hymnary.org. Non-commercial use of these recordings is permitted. For permission to use them for any other purposes, please contact manager@hymnary.org. Home/Music(smallchurchmusic.com) List SongsAlphabetically List Songsby Meter List Songs byTune Name About  



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