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Search Results

All:love

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Texts

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Text authorities

The Love of God

Author: Frederick M. Lehman Appears in 67 hymnals First Line: The love of God is greater far Refrain First Line: O love of God, how rich and pure
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What Wondrous Love Is This

Meter: 12.9.12.9 Appears in 226 hymnals First Line: What wondrous love is this, O my soul, O my soul Lyrics: 1 What wondrous love is this, O my soul, ... O my soul, what wondrous love is this, O my soul ... ! What wondrous love is this that caused the ... Topics: God Love and Grace of Scripture: 1 Corinthians 15:54-57 Used With Tune: WONDROUS LOVE Text Sources: American folk hymn
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Love Divine, All Loves Excelling

Author: Charles Wesley Meter: 8.7.8.7 D Appears in 1,728 hymnals Lyrics: 1. Love divine, all loves excelling, joy of heaven, to ... art all compassion, pure, unbounded love thou art; visit us with ... . 2. Breathe, O breathe thy loving Spirit into every troubled breast ... ceasing, glory in thy perfect love. 4. Finish, then, thy new ... Topics: Love Used With Tune: BEECHER

Tunes

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Tune authorities
Audio

AR HYD Y NOS

Meter: 8.4.8.4.8.8.8.4 Appears in 201 hymnals Tune Sources: Welsh traditional; Jones' Relics of the Welsh Bards , 1784 Tune Key: G Major Incipit: 17612 17567 71176 Used With Text: Through the Love of God Our Father
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GIFT OF LOVE

Composer: Hal Hopson Meter: 8.8.8.8 Appears in 188 hymnals Tune Key: G Major Incipit: 51232 16551 71234 Used With Text: When Love Is Found
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JESUS LOVES ME

Appears in 247 hymnals Incipit: 53323 55661 66555 Used With Text: Jesus loves me! this I know

Instances

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Published text-tune combinations (hymns) from specific hymnals
Text

Love Is Freedom's Law

Author: Daniel S. Warner Hymnal: Timeless Truths #176 Meter: 7.6.7.6 D 7.6.7.4 First Line: O love divine, unfathomed! Refrain First Line: O love! supreme affection! Lyrics: ... of peace I follow, O love, our hearts extol! Refrain ... the new creation, Where love is freedom’s law. ... 3 Worlds of ecstatic glory Love opens to our view, ... eternal rest. [Refrain] 4 Love holds a royal scepter, ... heart may fashion, Then love shall reign in thee. ... Scripture: Jeremiah 31:3 Tune Title: [O love divine, unfathomed!]
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Behold What Love

Author: Barney E. Warren Hymnal: Timeless Truths #426 Meter: 8.6.8.6.7.6.7.6 First Line: Behold what love, yes, love divine Refrain First Line: Such love cannot be fathomed Lyrics: 1 Behold what love, yes, love divine, The Father showed to ... sin to free. Refrain: Such love cannot be fathomed, ’Tis like ... . [Refrain] 3 Oh, depths of love to mortals lost, He suffered ... for thee. [Refrain] 4 The love of Christ is warm and ... Scripture: 1 John 3:1 Tune Title: [Behold what love, yes, love divine]
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Love Divine

Author: G. E. B. Hymnal: Timeless Truths #448 Meter: 8.7.8.7 D with refrain First Line: It was love that sent a Savior Refrain First Line: Love so divine Lyrics: ... . Refrain: Love so divine, Love so sublime, Love that is ... my heartache; It was love removed my doubt. [Refrain ... ] 3 It is love that still is knocking At ... knocks again; It is love that solves all problems ... strife; It is love, the love of Jesus, That ... Scripture: John 3:16 Tune Title: [It was love that sent a Savior]

People

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Authors, composers, editors, etc.

James Rowe

1865 - 1933 Author of "Love Lifted Me" in Baptist Hymnal 1991 Pseudonym: James S. Apple. James Rowe was born in England in 1865. He served four years in the Government Survey Office, Dublin Ireland as a young man. He came to America in 1890 where he worked for ten years for the New York Central & Hudson R.R. Co., then served for twelve years as superintendent of the Mohawk and Hudson River Humane Society. He began writing songs and hymns about 1896 and was a prolific writer of gospel verse with more than 9,000 published hymns, poems, recitations, and other works. Dianne Shapiro, from "The Singers and Their Songs: sketches of living gospel hymn writers" by Charles Hutchinson Gabriel (Chicago: The Rodeheaver Company, 1916)

Lowell Mason

1792 - 1872 Arranger of "AZMON" in The United Methodist Hymnal Dr. Lowell Mason (the degree was conferred by the University of New York) is justly called the father of American church music; and by his labors were founded the germinating principles of national musical intelligence and knowledge, which afforded a soil upon which all higher musical culture has been founded. To him we owe some of our best ideas in religious church music, elementary musical education, music in the schools, the popularization of classical chorus singing, and the art of teaching music upon the Inductive or Pestalozzian plan. More than that, we owe him no small share of the respect which the profession of music enjoys at the present time as contrasted with the contempt in which it was held a century or more ago. In fact, the entire art of music, as now understood and practiced in America, has derived advantage from the work of this great man. Lowell Mason was born in Medfield, Mass., January 8, 1792. From childhood he had manifested an intense love for music, and had devoted all his spare time and effort to improving himself according to such opportunities as were available to him. At the age of twenty he found himself filling a clerkship in a banking house in Savannah, Ga. Here he lost no opportunity of gratifying his passion for musical advancement, and was fortunate to meet for the first time a thoroughly qualified instructor, in the person of F. L. Abel. Applying his spare hours assiduously to the cultivation of the pursuit to which his passion inclined him, he soon acquired a proficiency that enabled him to enter the field of original composition, and his first work of this kind was embodied in the compilation of a collection of church music, which contained many of his own compositions. The manuscript was offered unavailingly to publishers in Philadelphia and in Boston. Fortunately for our musical advancement it finally secured the attention of the Boston Handel and Haydn Society, and by its committee was submitted to Dr. G. K. Jackson, the severest critic in Boston. Dr. Jackson approved most heartily of the work, and added a few of his own compositions to it. Thus enlarged, it was finally published in 1822 as The Handel and Haydn Society Collection of Church Music. Mason's name was omitted from the publication at his own request, which he thus explains, "I was then a bank officer in Savannah, and did not wish to be known as a musical man, as I had not the least thought of ever making music a profession." President Winchester, of the Handel and Haydn Society, sold the copyright for the young man. Mr. Mason went back to Savannah with probably $500 in his pocket as the preliminary result of his Boston visit. The book soon sprang into universal popularity, being at once adopted by the singing schools of New England, and through this means entering into the church choirs, to whom it opened up a higher field of harmonic beauty. Its career of success ran through some seventeen editions. On realizing this success, Mason determined to accept an invitation to come to Boston and enter upon a musical career. This was in 1826. He was made an honorary member of the Handel and Haydn Society, but declined to accept this, and entered the ranks as an active member. He had been invited to come to Boston by President Winchester and other musical friends and was guaranteed an income of $2,000 a year. He was also appointed, by the influence of these friends, director of music at the Hanover, Green, and Park Street churches, to alternate six months with each congregation. Finally he made a permanent arrangement with the Bowdoin Street Church, and gave up the guarantee, but again friendly influence stepped in and procured for him the position of teller at the American Bank. In 1827 Lowell Mason became president and conductor of the Handel and Haydn Society. It was the beginning of a career that was to win for him as has been already stated the title of "The Father of American Church Music." Although this may seem rather a bold claim it is not too much under the circumstances. Mr. Mason might have been in the average ranks of musicianship had he lived in Europe; in America he was well in advance of his surroundings. It was not too high praise (in spite of Mason's very simple style) when Dr. Jackson wrote of his song collection: "It is much the best book I have seen published in this country, and I do not hesitate to give it my most decided approbation," or that the great contrapuntist, Hauptmann, should say the harmonies of the tunes were dignified and churchlike and that the counterpoint was good, plain, singable and melodious. Charles C. Perkins gives a few of the reasons why Lowell Mason was the very man to lead American music as it then existed. He says, "First and foremost, he was not so very much superior to the members as to be unreasonably impatient at their shortcomings. Second, he was a born teacher, who, by hard work, had fitted himself to give instruction in singing. Third, he was one of themselves, a plain, self-made man, who could understand them and be understood of them." The personality of Dr. Mason was of great use to the art and appreciation of music in this country. He was of strong mind, dignified manners, sensitive, yet sweet and engaging. Prof. Horace Mann, one of the great educators of that day, said he would walk fifty miles to see and hear Mr. Mason teach if he could not otherwise have that advantage. Dr. Mason visited a number of the music schools in Europe, studied their methods, and incorporated the best things in his own work. He founded the Boston Academy of Music. The aim of this institution was to reach the masses and introduce music into the public schools. Dr. Mason resided in Boston from 1826 to 1851, when he removed to New York. Not only Boston benefited directly by this enthusiastic teacher's instruction, but he was constantly traveling to other societies in distant cities and helping their work. He had a notable class at North Reading, Mass., and he went in his later years as far as Rochester, where he trained a chorus of five hundred voices, many of them teachers, and some of them coming long distances to study under him. Before 1810 he had developed his idea of "Teachers' Conventions," and, as in these he had representatives from different states, he made musical missionaries for almost the entire country. He left behind him no less than fifty volumes of musical collections, instruction books, and manuals. As a composer of solid, enduring church music. Dr. Mason was one of the most successful this country has introduced. He was a deeply pious man, and was a communicant of the Presbyterian Church. Dr. Mason in 1817 married Miss Abigail Gregory, of Leesborough, Mass. The family consisted of four sons, Daniel Gregory, Lowell, William and Henry. The two former founded the publishing house of Mason Bros., dissolved by the death of the former in 19G9. Lowell and Henry were the founders of the great organ manufacturer of Mason & Hamlin. Dr. William Mason was one of the most eminent musicians that America has yet produced. Dr. Lowell Mason died at "Silverspring," a beautiful residence on the side of Orange Mountain, New Jersey, August 11, 1872, bequeathing his great musical library, much of which had been collected abroad, to Yale College. --Hall, J. H. (c1914). Biographies of Gospel Song and Hymn Writers. New York: Fleming H. Revell Company.

Dan Damon

b. 1955 Person Name: Daniel Charles Damon Author of "Dear Jesus, as God's Love Expressed" in Scripture Song Database Daniel Charles Damon (b. 1955) is an internationally published writer of hymn texts and tunes and is Associate Editor of Hymnody for Hope Publishing Company, Carol Stream, Illinois. Damon is also a jazz pianist and has played in many hotels and clubs in the San Francisco Bay area. He holds degrees from Greenville College, Greenville, Illinois (BME, 1977) and Pacific School of Religion, Berkeley, California (MDiv, 1987). He is an ordained Elder in the United Methodist Church in the San Francisco Bay area and a life member of the Hymn Society in the United States and Canada. Several single-author collections of Damon's hymns have been published: Faith Will Sing (Carol Stream, 1993), The Sound of Welcome (Carol Stream, 1998), To the Thirsty World (Nashville, 2002), Fields of Mercy (Carol Stream, 2007), and Garden of Joy (Carol Stream, 2011). He collaborated with text writer Gracia Grindal in A Treasury of Faith: Lectionary Hymns Series A (Colfax. 2012). Damon's hymns have been included in several major hymnals and supplements. He has also written hymn translations from Vietnamese, Portuguese, and Shona languages, and, with Patrick Matsikenyiri, edited Njalo, A Collection of 16 Hymns in the African Tradition (Nashville, 1996). He has released three recordings of hymns, carols, and traditional songs, and a solo piano recording of jazz standards (available at www.damonstuneshop.com). Damon has presented his work at national conferences of the Hymn Society in the United States and Canada and the Fellowship of United Methodists in Music and Worship Arts. He is a contributor to the Canterbury Dictionary of Hymnology. In 2016, Damon was made a Fellow of the hymn Society, the highest honor The Hymn Society can confer. Dan Damon

Hymnals

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Published hymn books and other collections

The Methodist Hymn-Book with Tunes

Publication Date: 1933 Publisher: Methodist Conference Office Publication Place: London

Small Church Music

Editors: Martin E. Leckebusch Description: The SmallChurchMusic site was launched in 2006, growing out of the requests from those struggling to provide suitable music for their services and meetings. Rev. Clyde McLennan was ordained in mid 1960’s and was a pastor in many small Australian country areas, and therefore was acutely aware of this music problem. Having also been trained as a Pipe Organist, recordings on site (which are a subset of the smallchurchmusic.com site) are all actually played by Clyde, and also include piano and piano with organ versions. All recordings are in MP3 format. Churches all around the world use the recordings, with downloads averaging over 60,000 per month. The recordings normally have an introduction, several verses and a slowdown on the last verse. Users are encouraged to use software: Audacity (http://www.audacityteam.org) or Song Surgeon (http://songsurgeon.com) (see http://scm-audacity.weebly.com for more information) to adjust the MP3 number of verses, tempo and pitch to suit their local needs. Copyright notice: Rev. Clyde McLennan, performer in this collection, has assigned his performer rights in this collection to Hymnary.org. Non-commercial use of these recordings is permitted. For permission to use them for any other purposes, please contact manager@hymnary.org. Home/Music(smallchurchmusic.com) List SongsAlphabetically List Songsby Meter List Songs byTune Name About  

Trinity Songs of Faith, Hope and Love

Publication Date: 1910 Publisher: Southern Music Co. Publication Place: Cullman, Ala. Editors: J. H. Showalter; H. F. Morris; Southern Music Co.

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