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When Peace like a River

Author: Horatio Gates Spafford Meter: 11.8.11.9 with refrain Appears in 405 hymnals First Line: When peace like a river attendeth my way Refrain First Line: It is well with my soul Lyrics: 1 When peace like a river attendeth my ... Topics: Peace Scripture: Philippians 4:7 Used With Tune: VILLE DU HAVRE
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Wonderful Peace

Author: W. D. Cornell, 19th Century Appears in 174 hymnals First Line: Far away in the depths of my spirit tonight Refrain First Line: Peace! Peace! wonderful peace Lyrics: ... an infinite calm. Refrain: Peace! Peace! wonderful peace, Coming down from the ... I have in this wonderful peace, Buried deep in the ... resting tonight in this wonderful peace, Resting sweetly in Jesus’ ... that City of peace, Where the Author of peace I shall ... Topics: Peace Spiritual Used With Tune: [Far away in the depths of my spirit tonight]
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Peace, Perfect Peace

Author: Edward H. Bickersteth Appears in 315 hymnals First Line: Peace, perfect peace, in this dark world of sin? Lyrics: ... of Jesus whispers peace within. 2 Peace, perfect peace, by thronging duties ... this is rest. 3 Peace, perfect peace, with sorrows surging round? ... safe and they. 5 Peace, perfect peace, our future all ... on the throne. 6 Peace, perfect peace, death shadowing us ... Topics: Peace, inner Scripture: Isaiah 26:3 Used With Tune: COENA DOMINI

Tunes

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VILLE DU HAVRE

Composer: Philip P. Bliss Meter: Irregular Appears in 158 hymnals Tune Key: D Flat Major Incipit: 55433 23465 43517 Used With Text: It Is Well with My Soul
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TEMPLE

Composer: Sebastian Temple Meter: Irregular Appears in 24 hymnals Tune Key: D Major Incipit: 33333 45353 3333 Used With Text: Make Me a Channel of Your Peace
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WORLD PEACE

Composer: Charles H. Webb; Jill Jackson; S. Miller Meter: Irregular Appears in 16 hymnals Tune Key: C Major Incipit: 11712 34516 41233 Used With Text: Let There Be Peace on Earth

Instances

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Published text-tune combinations (hymns) from specific hymnals
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Peace, Peace; God's Wonderful Peace

Hymnal: Worship and Service Hymnal #541 (1957) Lyrics: Peace, peace; God's wonderful peace Be with you now and evermore. Amen, Amen. Topics: Service Music Closing Sentences Languages: English Tune Title: [Peace, peace; God's wonderful peace]

Peace for the Children

Author: Doreen Lankshear-Smith Hymnal: More Voices #149 (2007) First Line: Peace for the children, peace, peace Lyrics: Peace for the children, ... Topics: Peace Scripture: Isaiah 57:19 Languages: English Tune Title: [Peace for the children, peace peace]

Peace, Peace; God's Wonderful Peace

Hymnal: Hymnal of the Church of God #513 (1971) Languages: English Tune Title: [Peace, peace; God's wonderful peace]

People

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Authors, composers, editors, etc.

A. L. Peace

1844 - 1912 Person Name: Albert Lister Peace Composer of "ST. MARGARET (Peace)" in The Cyber Hymnal Born: Jan­u­ary 26, 1844, Hud­ders­field, Eng­land. Died: March 14, 1912, Blundelsands,England Buried: St. Ma­ry’s Church, Sef­ton, Lancashire

W. A. Ogden

1841 - 1897 Composer of "[When on the wild tumultuous sea]" in Fair as the Morning. Hymns and Tunes for Praise in the Sunday-School William A. Ogden, 1841-1897 Born: Oc­to­ber 10, 1841, Frank­lin Coun­ty, Ohio. Died: Oc­to­ber 14, 1897, To­le­do, Ohio. When Ogden was six years old, his fam­i­ly moved to In­di­a­na. He began stu­dy­ing mu­sic in lo­cal sing­ing schools at age 8, and could read church mu­sic fair­ly well by age 10. A lit­tle la­ter, he could write a mel­o­dy by hear­ing it sung or played. When he was 18, he be­came a chor­ist­er in his home church. At the out­break of the Amer­i­can ci­vil war, Og­den en­list­ed in the 30th In­di­a­na Vol­un­teer In­fant­ry. Duri­ng the war he or­gan­ized a male choir, which be­came well known throug­hout the Ar­my of the Cum­ber­land. After the war, Og­den re­turned home and re­sumed his mu­sic­al stu­dies. Among his teach­ers were Lowell Mason, Thom­as Hast­ings, E. E. Baily, and B. F. Bak­er, pres­i­dent of the Bos­ton Mu­sic School. As his skills de­vel­oped, Ogden is­sued his first song book, The Sil­ver Song, in 1870; it be­came im­mense­ly pop­u­lar, sell­ing 500,000 co­pies. He went on to pub­lish num­er­ous other song books. In ad­di­tion to com­pos­ing, Og­den taught at ma­ny schools in the Unit­ed States and Ca­na­da. In 1887, he be­came sup­er­in­tend­ent of mu­sic in the pub­lic schools of To­le­do, Ohio. His works in­clude: New Sil­ver Songs for Sun­day School (Tole­do, Ohio: W. W. Whit­ney, 1872) Crown of Life (Tole­do, Ohio: W. W. Whit­ney, 1875) Notes of Vic­to­ry, with Ed­mund Lo­renz (Day­ton, Ohio: Unit­ed Breth­ren Publishing Com­pa­ny, 1885) The Way of Life (Tole­do, Ohio: W. W. Whit­ney, 1886) Gathered Jew­els (Tole­do, Ohio: W. W. Whit­ney, 1886) Lyrics-- Baptize Us Anew Everlasting Life He Is Able to De­li­ver Thee I’ve a Mess­age from the Lord On a Christ­mas Morn­ing Ring Out the Bells for Christ­mas Scattering Pre­cious Seed Seeking the Lost Where He Leads I’ll Fol­low Working, O Christ, with Thee Music-- All Things Are Rea­dy Bright For­ev­er­more, The Bring Them In Clark’s Grove Come to the Feast Eye of Faith, The Gathering Home Gracious Re­deem­er, The More Than Con­quer­ors Star in the East Steer To­ward the Light There Is Joy We’ll Work --hymntime.com/tch ============================== Ogden, W. A., is the author of “The blessed Saviour died for me, On the Cross" (Good Friday) and of the music thereto in I. D. Sankey's Sacred Songs and Solos. --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology, Appendix, Part II (1907) ============================== The DNAH Archives also has a profile of Ogden from the Portrait and biographical record of city of Toledo and Lucas and Wood counties, Ohio (1895) and a transcription of the Toledo News-Bee article of 16 October 1897 describing how the city paid tribute to Ogden at his death with resolutions, school closings, and funeral program.

William B. Bradbury

1816 - 1868 Composer of "ALETTA" in Church Hymnal, Mennonite The churchgoing people of today are generally familiar with the name Wm. B. Bradbury. Many have cherished that name from childhood. Most of us began our musical experiences by singing his songs, and as early experiences are the most lasting, we will carry these melodies, with their happy associations, through life. Mr. Bradbury, in his day, created a style of juvenile music, especially Sunday-school music, that swept the country. He set the pattern for his successors in Sunday-school song-making, and those who have harped on the key-note that he struck have been most successful. True, we have improved some in the way of hymns, and a smoother voicing of the parts, but there are still many Sunday-school song writers who regard Mr. Bradbury's writings as the ideal. William Batchelder Bradbury was born at York, York County, Maine, October 6, 1816. He came of a good family. He spent the first few years of his life on his father's farm, and rainy days would be spent in the shoe-shop, as was the general custom in those days. He loved music, and would spend his spare hours in studying and practicing such music as he could find. In 1830 his parents removed to Boston, where he saw and heard for the first time a piano and organ, as well as various other instruments. The effect was to lead him to devote his life to the service of music. Accordingly he took lessons upon the organ, and as early as 1831: had achieved some reputation as an organist. He attended Dr. Mason's singing classes, and later was admitted into his celebrated Bowdoin Street church choir, and the Doctor proved to be a valuable and steadfast friend. After some months he was asked to preside at the organ of a certain church at a salary of twenty-five dollars per annum. On trying the organ he found it to be one of those ancient affairs which required the keys to be pulled up as well as pressed down, and he suggested that his pay should be at least fifty dollars, since the playing required this double duty. It was not long till a better paying situation was offered him — that of one hundred dollars a year. At the age of twenty he was still singing in Dr. Mason's choir, when one evening at recess, the Doctor laid his hand on his shoulder, and said "William, I have an application for a teacher at Machias, Maine, to teach three large singing schools, besides private pupils, and I believe you are just the man for the place." He was overjoyed and delighted. He sent his terms, which were accepted, and achieved success. After a busy year and a half of work at Machias, he returned to Boston to marry his sweetheart, and then located at St. Johns, New Brunswick. Here the people did not take sufficient interest in his work, and he returned to Boston. Then came a call to take charge of the music of the First Baptist Church of Brooklyn. Dr. Mason gave him a letter of introduction. At the time of his taking charge of the organ at the Brooklyn church there was some opposition to the organ among the members, but he took pains to play it so well, and in such good taste, that he speedily won all to favor its use. After a year's work here the important era in his career began. He took charge of the choir and organ of the Baptist Tabernacle, New York City, and in addition started a singing class for the young. This first class was visited by many superintendents and others interested in Sunday-schools, who were uniformly delighted with what they saw and heard, and the originator of the movement soon found himself engaged in many similar schools in various parts of the city. These classes became very popular. In the Spring Street Church there was a class of over six hundred. From these schools sprang the celebrated "Juvenile Musical Festivals," as they were called, held at the Broadway Tabernacle, which, for some years, were such a prominent feature among the musical events of the city. Those annual concerts were occasions never to be forgotten by any who were present. The sight itself was a thrilling one. A thousand children were seated on a gradually rising platform, which spread the scene, as it were, most gracefully before the eye. About two-thirds of the class were girls, dressed uniformly in white with a white wreath and blue sash. The boys were dressed in jackets with collars turned over, something in the Byron style. When all were ready, a chord was struck on the piano — a thousand children instantly arose, presenting a sight that can be far more easily imagined than described. Of the musical effect produced by such a chorus we will not attempt to speak. Mr. Bradbury improved every occasion of these large gatherings to impress upon the public the necessity of musical instruction in the public schools, and in time he had the satisfaction of seeing music taught as a regular study in the public schools of New York. While he was teaching among the children, he would occasionally compose a song for them, and to their delight. So he decided to make a book. The Young Choir was the result. This was in 1841. Being an inexperienced writer, he got Dr. Hastings to correct his music. The book was a success, and others followed. Mr. Bradbury had a desire to go to Europe and study with some of the masters there, and on the second day of July, 1847, he took passage for England, accompanied by his wife and daughter. They were thirty days on the ocean. He remained in London some weeks, and made good use of his time while there. He made the acquaintance of Jenny Lind, then quite unknown to American fame. He arrived in Leipsic, Germany, September 11th, where he made arrangements to begin his studies without delay. Wenzel was his teacher for the piano and organ, Boehme for voice and Hauptmann for harmony. This city was the home of Mendelssohn, whose death occurred only a few weeks after Mr. Bradbury's arrival, and whose funeral he had the sad privilege of attending. It need scarcely be stated that Mr. Bradbury pursued his studies with the greatest assiduity. While thus zealously devoting himself to personal cultivation and improvement, Mr. Bradbury was in no danger of losing sight of the work at home for which he was preparing himself. He visited many public and private schools, and familiarized himself thoroughly with all the German methods of popular musical instruction. He also made the acquaintance of many prominent musicians. He made a short but very interesting tour across the Alps into Switzerland, After his return to New York, in 1849, he devoted his entire time to teaching, conducting conventions, composing, and editing music books. In 1851, in connection with his brother, E. Gr. Bradbury, he commenced the manufacture of the Bradbury pianos, which at one time were quite popular. Prof. Wm. B. Bradbury was one of the great trio (the other two being Drs. Mason and Root) to which the church and vocal music of this country owe much. Mr. Bradbury was an excellent composer. His melodies have an easy, natural flow, and his harmonies are simple and natural, and many of his hymn-tunes and gospel songs still in use are among the best that American writers have produced. He was unceasingly active, having edited fifty-nine books of sacred and secular music, a large part of which were his own work. Professor Bradbury was an excellent conductor and teacher. He was always kind, patient, and full of sympathy for others. Mr. Bradbury died at his residence, Montclair, N. J., January 8, 1868, leaving a widow, four daughters and a son. He will always occupy a prominent place in American musical history. --Hall, J. H. (c1914). Biographies of Gospel Song and Hymn Writers. New York: Fleming H. Revell Company.

Hymnals

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Published hymn books and other collections

Small Church Music

Editors: John Hampden Gurney Description: The SmallChurchMusic site was commenced in 2006 grew out of the requests from those struggling to provide suitable music for their services and meetings. Rev. Clyde McLennan was ordained in mid 1960’s and was a pastor in many small Australian country areas, and therefore was acutely aware of this music problem. Having also been trained as a Pipe Organist, recordings on site (which are a subset of the smallchurchmusic.com site) are all actually played by Clyde, and also include piano and piano with organ versions. All recordings are in MP3 format. Churches all around the world use the recordings, with downloads averaging over 60,000 per month. The recordings normally have an introduction, several verses and a slowdown on the last verse. Users are encouraged to use software: Audacity (http://www.audacityteam.org) or Song Surgeon (http://songsurgeon.com) (see http://scm-audacity.weebly.com for more information) to adjust the MP3 number of verses, tempo and pitch to suit their local needs. Copyright notice: Rev. Clyde McLennan, performer in this collection, has assigned his performer rights in this collection to Hymnary.org. Non-commercial use of these recordings is permitted. For permission to use them for any other purposes, please contact manager@hymnary.org. Home/Music(smallchurchmusic.com) List SongsAlphabetically List Songsby Meter List Songs byTune Name About  

Christian Classics Ethereal Hymnary

Publication Date: 2007 Publisher: Grand Rapids, MI: Christian Classics Ethereal Library

Perfect Peace

Publication Date: 1946 Publisher: Stamps Quartet Music Co. Publication Place: Dallas, Tex. Editors: Albert Edward Brumley; Stamps Quartet Music Co.

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Ten Pieces for Piano and Solo Instrument Arrangements and original compositions. The Peace of Ch…
This beloved prayer is set here for unaccompanied voices in a very spare and quiet dialog between ba…
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