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When Peace like a River

Author: Horatio Gates Spafford Meter: 11.8.11.9 with refrain Appears in 406 hymnals First Line: When peace like a river attendeth my way Refrain First Line: It is well with my soul Lyrics: 1 When peace like a river attendeth my ... Topics: Peace Scripture: Philippians 4:7 Used With Tune: VILLE DU HAVRE
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Wonderful Peace

Author: W. D. Cornell, 19th Century Appears in 174 hymnals First Line: Far away in the depths of my spirit tonight Refrain First Line: Peace! Peace! wonderful peace Lyrics: ... an infinite calm. Refrain: Peace! Peace! wonderful peace, Coming down from the ... I have in this wonderful peace, Buried deep in the ... resting tonight in this wonderful peace, Resting sweetly in Jesus’ ... that City of peace, Where the Author of peace I shall ... Topics: Peace Spiritual Used With Tune: [Far away in the depths of my spirit tonight]
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Peace, Perfect Peace

Author: Edward H. Bickersteth Appears in 315 hymnals First Line: Peace, perfect peace, in this dark world of sin? Lyrics: ... of Jesus whispers peace within. 2 Peace, perfect peace, by thronging duties ... this is rest. 3 Peace, perfect peace, with sorrows surging round? ... safe and they. 5 Peace, perfect peace, our future all ... on the throne. 6 Peace, perfect peace, death shadowing us ... Topics: Peace, inner Scripture: Isaiah 26:3 Used With Tune: COENA DOMINI

Tunes

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PEACE

Composer: Frederick N. Shackley Appears in 1 hymnal Used With Text: Peace
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PEACE

Composer: George W. Chadwick Meter: 10.10.10.6 with refrain Appears in 18 hymnals Tune Key: A Flat Major Incipit: 55511 71232 13334 Used With Text: I Sought the Lord, and Afterward I Knew
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[There comes to my heart one sweet strain]

Composer: P. Bilhorn Appears in 70 hymnals Incipit: 53213 51775 43264 Used With Text: Sweet Peace, the Gift of God's Love

Instances

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Published text-tune combinations (hymns) from specific hymnals
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Peace

Author: Burton H. Winslow Hymnal: The Praise Book for Young People's Societies, Church Prayer Meetings and Sunday Schools #268 (1906) First Line: Sweetest word of Jesus Refrain First Line: Word of words the sweetest Lyrics: ... Saviour’s blessed word, “Peace, I give you peace.” Refrain: Word of ... o’er Bethlehem’s plain. Peace on earth from heaven, May ... shall own its sway, Peace, most blessed peace. 2 On the cross ... Saviour’s blessed word, “Peace, I give you peace.” [Refrain] 3 Hear ... Topics: Peace Tune Title: PEACE
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I Sought the Lord, and Afterward I Knew

Author: Anonymous Hymnal: Trinity Hymnal (Rev. ed.) #466 (1990) Meter: 10.10.10.6 with refrain Lyrics: 1 I sought the Lord, and afterward I knew he moved my soul to seek him, seeking me; it was not I that found, O Savior true, no, I was found of thee. 2 Thou didst reach forth thy hand and mine enfold; I walked and sank not on the storm-vexed sea - 'twas not ... Topics: Election; The Way of Salvation Salvation by Grace; Christ Love and Grace of; Grace Sovereign ; Holy Spirit Efficacious Grace of Scripture: 1 John 4:19 Languages: English Tune Title: PEACE
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Wonderful Peace

Author: Rev. W. D. Cornell Hymnal: The Finest of the Wheat No. 2 #7 (1894) First Line: Far away in the depths of my spirit tonight Refrain First Line: Peace, peace, wonderful peace Tune Title: [Far away in the depths of my spirit tonight]

People

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Authors, composers, editors, etc.

A. L. Peace

1844 - 1912 Person Name: Albert Lister Peace Composer of "ST. MARGARET (Peace)" in The Cyber Hymnal Born: Jan­u­ary 26, 1844, Hud­ders­field, Eng­land. Died: March 14, 1912, Blundelsands,England Buried: St. Ma­ry’s Church, Sef­ton, Lancashire

Orlando Gibbons

1583 - 1625 Person Name: Orlando Gibbons, 1583-1625 Composer of "SONG 46 (GIBBONS)" in The Hymnary of the United Church of Canada Orlando Gibbons (baptised 25 December 1583 – 5 June 1625) was an English composer, virginalist and organist of the late Tudor and early Jacobean periods. He was a leading composer in the England of his day. Gibbons was born in Cambridge and christened at Oxford the same year – thus appearing in Oxford church records. Between 1596 and 1598 he sang in the Choir of King's College, Cambridge, where his brother Edward Gibbons (1568–1650), eldest of the four sons of William Gibbons, was master of the choristers. The second brother Ellis Gibbons (1573–1603) was also a promising composer, but died young. Orlando entered the university in 1598 and achieved the degree of Bachelor of Music in 1606. James I appointed him a Gentleman of the Chapel Royal, where he served as an organist from at least 1615 until his death. In 1623 he became senior organist at the Chapel Royal, with Thomas Tomkins as junior organist. He also held positions as keyboard player in the privy chamber of the court of Prince Charles (later King Charles I), and organist at Westminster Abbey. He died at age 41 in Canterbury of apoplexy, and a monument to him was built in Canterbury Cathedral. A suspicion immediately arose that Gibbons had died of the plague, which was rife in England that year. Two physicians who had been present at his death were ordered to make a report, and performed an autopsy, the account of which survives in The National Archives: We whose names are here underwritten: having been called to give our counsels to Mr. Orlando Gibbons; in the time of his late and sudden sickness, which we found in the beginning lethargical, or a profound sleep; out of which, we could never recover him, neither by inward nor outward medicines, & then instantly he fell in most strong, & sharp convulsions; which did wring his mouth up to his ears, & his eyes were distorted, as though they would have been thrust out of his head & then suddenly he lost both speech, sight and hearing, & so grew apoplectical & lost the whole motion of every part of his body, & so died. Then here upon (his death being so sudden) rumours were cast out that he did die of the plague, whereupon we . . . caused his body to be searched by certain women that were sworn to deliver the truth, who did affirm that they never saw a fairer corpse. Yet notwithstanding we to give full satisfaction to all did cause the skull to be opened in our presence & we carefully viewed the body, which we found also to be very clean without any show or spot of any contagious matter. In the brain we found the whole & sole cause of his sickness namely a great admirable blackness & syderation in the outside of the brain. Within the brain (being opened) there did issue out abundance of water intermixed with blood & this we affirm to be the only cause of his sudden death. His death was a shock to peers and the suddenness of his passing drew comment more for the haste of his burial – and of its location at Canterbury rather than the body being returned to London. His wife, Elizabeth, died a little over a year later, aged in her mid-30s, leaving Orlando's eldest brother, Edward, to care for the children left orphans by this event. Of these children only the eldest son, Christopher Gibbons, went on to become a musician. One of the most versatile English composers of his time, Gibbons wrote a quantity of keyboard works, around thirty fantasias for viols, a number of madrigals (the best-known being "The Silver Swan"), and many popular verse anthems. His choral music is distinguished by his complete mastery of counterpoint, combined with his wonderful gift for melody. Perhaps his most well known verse anthem is This is the record of John, which sets an Advent text for solo countertenor or tenor, alternating with full chorus. The soloist is required to demonstrate considerable technical facility at points, and the work at once expresses the rhetorical force of the text, whilst never being demonstrative or bombastic. He also produced two major settings of Evensong, the Short Service and the Second Service. The former includes a beautifully expressive Nunc dimittis, while the latter is an extended composition, combining verse and full sections. Gibbons's full anthems include the expressive O Lord, in thy wrath, and the Ascension Day anthem O clap your hands together for eight voices. He contributed six pieces to the first printed collection of keyboard music in England, Parthenia (to which he was by far the youngest of the three contributors), published in about 1611. Gibbons's surviving keyboard output comprises some 45 pieces. The polyphonic fantasia and dance forms are the best represented genres. Gibbons's writing exhibits full mastery of three- and four-part counterpoint. Most of the fantasias are complex, multisectional pieces, treating multiple subjects imitatively. Gibbons's approach to melody in both fantasias and dances features a capability for almost limitless development of simple musical ideas, on display in works such as Pavane in D minor and Lord Salisbury's Pavan and Galliard. In the 20th century, the Canadian pianist Glenn Gould championed Gibbons's music, and named him as his favorite composer. Gould wrote of Gibbons's hymns and anthems: "ever since my teen-age years this music ... has moved me more deeply than any other sound experience I can think of." In one interview, Gould compared Gibbons to Beethoven and Webern: ...despite the requisite quota of scales and shakes in such half-hearted virtuoso vehicles as the Salisbury Galliard, one is never quite able to counter the impression of music of supreme beauty that lacks its ideal means of reproduction. Like Beethoven in his last quartets, or Webern at almost any time, Gibbons is an artist of such intractable commitment that, in the keyboard field, at least, his works work better in one's memory, or on paper, than they ever can through the intercession of a sounding-board. To this day, Gibbons's obit service is commemorated every year in King's College Chapel, Cambridge. --wikipedia.org

William B. Bradbury

1816 - 1868 Composer of "ALETTA" in Church Hymnal, Mennonite The churchgoing people of today are generally familiar with the name Wm. B. Bradbury. Many have cherished that name from childhood. Most of us began our musical experiences by singing his songs, and as early experiences are the most lasting, we will carry these melodies, with their happy associations, through life. Mr. Bradbury, in his day, created a style of juvenile music, especially Sunday-school music, that swept the country. He set the pattern for his successors in Sunday-school song-making, and those who have harped on the key-note that he struck have been most successful. True, we have improved some in the way of hymns, and a smoother voicing of the parts, but there are still many Sunday-school song writers who regard Mr. Bradbury's writings as the ideal. William Batchelder Bradbury was born at York, York County, Maine, October 6, 1816. He came of a good family. He spent the first few years of his life on his father's farm, and rainy days would be spent in the shoe-shop, as was the general custom in those days. He loved music, and would spend his spare hours in studying and practicing such music as he could find. In 1830 his parents removed to Boston, where he saw and heard for the first time a piano and organ, as well as various other instruments. The effect was to lead him to devote his life to the service of music. Accordingly he took lessons upon the organ, and as early as 1831: had achieved some reputation as an organist. He attended Dr. Mason's singing classes, and later was admitted into his celebrated Bowdoin Street church choir, and the Doctor proved to be a valuable and steadfast friend. After some months he was asked to preside at the organ of a certain church at a salary of twenty-five dollars per annum. On trying the organ he found it to be one of those ancient affairs which required the keys to be pulled up as well as pressed down, and he suggested that his pay should be at least fifty dollars, since the playing required this double duty. It was not long till a better paying situation was offered him — that of one hundred dollars a year. At the age of twenty he was still singing in Dr. Mason's choir, when one evening at recess, the Doctor laid his hand on his shoulder, and said "William, I have an application for a teacher at Machias, Maine, to teach three large singing schools, besides private pupils, and I believe you are just the man for the place." He was overjoyed and delighted. He sent his terms, which were accepted, and achieved success. After a busy year and a half of work at Machias, he returned to Boston to marry his sweetheart, and then located at St. Johns, New Brunswick. Here the people did not take sufficient interest in his work, and he returned to Boston. Then came a call to take charge of the music of the First Baptist Church of Brooklyn. Dr. Mason gave him a letter of introduction. At the time of his taking charge of the organ at the Brooklyn church there was some opposition to the organ among the members, but he took pains to play it so well, and in such good taste, that he speedily won all to favor its use. After a year's work here the important era in his career began. He took charge of the choir and organ of the Baptist Tabernacle, New York City, and in addition started a singing class for the young. This first class was visited by many superintendents and others interested in Sunday-schools, who were uniformly delighted with what they saw and heard, and the originator of the movement soon found himself engaged in many similar schools in various parts of the city. These classes became very popular. In the Spring Street Church there was a class of over six hundred. From these schools sprang the celebrated "Juvenile Musical Festivals," as they were called, held at the Broadway Tabernacle, which, for some years, were such a prominent feature among the musical events of the city. Those annual concerts were occasions never to be forgotten by any who were present. The sight itself was a thrilling one. A thousand children were seated on a gradually rising platform, which spread the scene, as it were, most gracefully before the eye. About two-thirds of the class were girls, dressed uniformly in white with a white wreath and blue sash. The boys were dressed in jackets with collars turned over, something in the Byron style. When all were ready, a chord was struck on the piano — a thousand children instantly arose, presenting a sight that can be far more easily imagined than described. Of the musical effect produced by such a chorus we will not attempt to speak. Mr. Bradbury improved every occasion of these large gatherings to impress upon the public the necessity of musical instruction in the public schools, and in time he had the satisfaction of seeing music taught as a regular study in the public schools of New York. While he was teaching among the children, he would occasionally compose a song for them, and to their delight. So he decided to make a book. The Young Choir was the result. This was in 1841. Being an inexperienced writer, he got Dr. Hastings to correct his music. The book was a success, and others followed. Mr. Bradbury had a desire to go to Europe and study with some of the masters there, and on the second day of July, 1847, he took passage for England, accompanied by his wife and daughter. They were thirty days on the ocean. He remained in London some weeks, and made good use of his time while there. He made the acquaintance of Jenny Lind, then quite unknown to American fame. He arrived in Leipsic, Germany, September 11th, where he made arrangements to begin his studies without delay. Wenzel was his teacher for the piano and organ, Boehme for voice and Hauptmann for harmony. This city was the home of Mendelssohn, whose death occurred only a few weeks after Mr. Bradbury's arrival, and whose funeral he had the sad privilege of attending. It need scarcely be stated that Mr. Bradbury pursued his studies with the greatest assiduity. While thus zealously devoting himself to personal cultivation and improvement, Mr. Bradbury was in no danger of losing sight of the work at home for which he was preparing himself. He visited many public and private schools, and familiarized himself thoroughly with all the German methods of popular musical instruction. He also made the acquaintance of many prominent musicians. He made a short but very interesting tour across the Alps into Switzerland, After his return to New York, in 1849, he devoted his entire time to teaching, conducting conventions, composing, and editing music books. In 1851, in connection with his brother, E. Gr. Bradbury, he commenced the manufacture of the Bradbury pianos, which at one time were quite popular. Prof. Wm. B. Bradbury was one of the great trio (the other two being Drs. Mason and Root) to which the church and vocal music of this country owe much. Mr. Bradbury was an excellent composer. His melodies have an easy, natural flow, and his harmonies are simple and natural, and many of his hymn-tunes and gospel songs still in use are among the best that American writers have produced. He was unceasingly active, having edited fifty-nine books of sacred and secular music, a large part of which were his own work. Professor Bradbury was an excellent conductor and teacher. He was always kind, patient, and full of sympathy for others. Mr. Bradbury died at his residence, Montclair, N. J., January 8, 1868, leaving a widow, four daughters and a son. He will always occupy a prominent place in American musical history. --Hall, J. H. (c1914). Biographies of Gospel Song and Hymn Writers. New York: Fleming H. Revell Company.

Hymnals

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Published hymn books and other collections

Small Church Music

Editors: John Hampden Gurney Description: The SmallChurchMusic site was commenced in 2006 grew out of the requests from those struggling to provide suitable music for their services and meetings. Rev. Clyde McLennan was ordained in mid 1960’s and was a pastor in many small Australian country areas, and therefore was acutely aware of this music problem. Having also been trained as a Pipe Organist, recordings on site (which are a subset of the smallchurchmusic.com site) are all actually played by Clyde, and also include piano and piano with organ versions. All recordings are in MP3 format. Churches all around the world use the recordings, with downloads averaging over 60,000 per month. The recordings normally have an introduction, several verses and a slowdown on the last verse. Users are encouraged to use software: Audacity (http://www.audacityteam.org) or Song Surgeon (http://songsurgeon.com) (see http://scm-audacity.weebly.com for more information) to adjust the MP3 number of verses, tempo and pitch to suit their local needs. Copyright notice: Rev. Clyde McLennan, performer in this collection, has assigned his performer rights in this collection to Hymnary.org. Non-commercial use of these recordings is permitted. For permission to use them for any other purposes, please contact manager@hymnary.org. Home/Music(smallchurchmusic.com) List SongsAlphabetically List Songsby Meter List Songs byTune Name About  

Christian Classics Ethereal Hymnary

Publication Date: 2007 Publisher: Grand Rapids, MI: Christian Classics Ethereal Library

Perfect Peace

Publication Date: 1946 Publisher: Stamps Quartet Music Co. Publication Place: Dallas, Tex. Editors: Albert Edward Brumley; Stamps Quartet Music Co.

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