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James D. Vaughan

1864 - 1941 Composer of "[When this pilgrimage is o'er and we reach that shining shore]" in His Voice of Love Vaughan, James D(avid); b. Dec. 14, 1864, between Lawrence Co. and Giles Co., TN; d. Feb. 9, 1941, Lawrenceburg, TN; music publisher, composer and compiler of gospel songs in shape notation

A. H. Ackley

1887 - 1960 Author of "Satisfied" in Coronation Hymns Alfred Henry Ackley was born 21 January 1887 in Spring Hill, Pennsylvania. He was the youngest son of Stanley Frank Ackley and the younger brother of B. D. Ackley. His father taught him music and he also studied at the Royal Academy of Music in London. He graduated from Westminster Theological Seminary in Maryland and was ordained as a Presbyterian minister in 1914. He served churches in Pennsylvania and California. He also worked with the Billy Sunday and Homer Rodeheaver evangelist team and for Homer Rodeheaver's publishing company. He wrote around 1500 hymns. He died 3 July 1960 in Los Angeles. Dianne Shapiro (from ackleygenealogy.com by Ed Ackley and Allen C. Ackley)

B. D. Ackley

1872 - 1958 Composer of "[When I have finished my pilgrimage here]" in Coronation Hymns Bentley DeForrest Ackley was born 27 September 1872 in Spring Hill, Pennsylvania. He was the oldest son of Stanley Frank Ackley and the brother of A. H. Ackley. In his early years, he traveled with his father and his father's band. He learned to play several musical instruments. By the age of 16, after the family had moved to New York, he began to play the organ for churches. He married Bessie Hill Morley on 20 December 1893. In 1907 he joined the Billy Sunday and Homer Rodeheaver evangelist team as secretary/pianist. He worked for and traveled with the Billy Sunday organization for 8 years. He also worked as an editor for the Homer Rodeheaver publishing company. He composed more than 3000 tunes. He died 3 September 1958 in Winona Hills, Indiana at the age of 85 and is buried in Oakwood Cemetery, Warsaw, Indiana, near his friend Homer Rodeheaver. Dianne Shapiro (from ackleyfamilygenealogy.com by Ed Ackley and Allen C. Ackley)

P. P. Bilhorn

1865 - 1936 Person Name: P. Bilhorn Composer of "[How swiftly the years of our pilgrimage fly]" in Crowning glory no. 2 Pseudonyms: Irene Durfee; P. H. Rob­lin (a an­a­gram of his name). Bilhorn was born on Ju­ly 22, 1865 in Men­do­ta, Il­l­inois. His fam­i­ly name was orig­in­al­ly Pul­horn; it was changed by a judge in Ot­ta­wa, Il­linois, named Abra­ham Lin­coln. Peter and his bro­ther formed the Eu­re­ka Wa­gon and Carriage Works in Chi­ca­go, Il­linois. Lat­er, Pe­ter be­came in­volved in Gos­pel mu­sic and wrote some 2,000 Go­spel songs in his life­time. He al­so invent­ed a folding pump or­gan used at re­viv­als in the late 19th Cen­tu­ry, and found­ed the Bil­horn Fold­ing Or­gan Com­pa­ny in Chi­ca­go, Il­li­nois. His evangelistic work took him into all the states of the Union, Great Britain, and other foreign countries. He was Billy Sunday’s song leader before 1908. He died on De­cem­ber 13, 1936 in Los An­ge­les, Cal­i­for­nia. NN, Hymnary. Source: http://www.hymntime.com/tch/bio/b/i/l/bilhorn_pp.htm

James Montgomery

1771 - 1854 Author of "On His pilgrimage of woe" in Sacred Poems and Hymns Montgomery, James, son of John Montgomery, a Moravian minister, was born at Irvine, Ayrshire, Nov. 4, 1771. In 1776 he removed with his parents to the Moravian Settlement at Gracehill, near Ballymena, county of Antrim. Two years after he was sent to the Fulneck Seminary, Yorkshire. He left Fulneck in 1787, and entered a retail shop at Mirfield, near Wakefield. Soon tiring of that he entered upon a similar situation at Wath, near Rotherham, only to find it quite as unsuitable to his taste as the former. A journey to London, with the hope of finding a publisher for his youthful poems ended in failure; and in 1792 he was glad to leave Wath for Shefield to join Mr. Gales, an auctioneer, bookseller, and printer of the Sheffield Register newspaper, as his assistant. In 1794 Mr. Gales left England to avoid a political prosecution. Montgomery took the Sheffield Register in hand, changed its name to The Sheffield Iris, and continued to edit it for thirty-one years. During the next two years he was imprisoned twice, first for reprinting therein a song in commemoration of "The Fall of the Bastille," and the second for giving an account of a riot in Sheffield. The editing of his paper, the composition and publication of his poems and hynms, the delivery of lectures on poetry in Sheffield and at the Royal Institution, London, and the earnest advocacy of Foreign Missions and the Bible Society in many parts of the country, gave great variety but very little of stirring incident to his life. In 1833 he received a Royal pension of £200 a year. He died in his sleep, at the Mount, Sheffield, April 30, 1854, and was honoured with a public funeral. A statue was erected to his memory in the Sheffield General Cemetery, and a stained glass window in the Parish Church. A Wesleyan chapel and a public hall are also named in his honour. Montgomery's principal poetical works, including those which he edited, were:— (1) Prison Amusements, 1797; (2) The Wanderer of Switzerland, 1806; (3) The West Indies, 1807; (4) The World before the Flood, 1813; (5) Greenland and Other Poems, 1819; (6) Songs of Zion, 1822; (7) The Christian Psalmist, 1825; (8) The Christian Poet, 1825; (9) The Pelican Island, 1828; (10) The Poet’s Portfolio, 1835; (11) Original Hymns for Public, Private, and Social Devotion, 1853. He also published minor pieces at various times, and four editions of his Poetical Works, the first in 1828, the second in 1836, the third in 1841, and the fourth in 1854. Most of these works contained original hymns. He also contributed largely to Collyer's Collection, 1812, and other hymnbooks published during the next 40 years, amongst which the most noticeable was Cotterill's Selections of 1819, in which more than 50 of his compositions appeared. In his Christian Psalmist, 1825, there are 100 of his hymns, and in his Original Hymns, 1853, 355 and 5 doxologies. His Songs of Zion, 1822, number 56. Deducting those which are repeated in the Original Hymns, there remain about 400 original compositions. Of Montgomery's 400 hymns (including his versions of the Psalms) more than 100 are still in common use. With the aid of Montgomery's MSS. we have given a detailed account of a large number. The rest are as follows:— i. Appeared in Collyer's Collection, 1812. 1. Jesus, our best beloved Friend. Personal Dedication to Christ. 2. When on Sinai's top I see. Sinai, Tabor, and Calvary. ii. Appeared in Cotterill's Selection, 1819. 3. Come to Calvary's holy mountain. The Open Fountain. 4. God in the high and holy place. God in Nature. The cento in Com. Praise, 1879, and others, "If God hath made this world so fair," is from this hymn. 5. Hear me, O Lord, in my distress. Ps. cxliii. 6. Heaven is a place of rest from sin. Preparation for Heaven. 7. I cried unto the Lord most just. Ps. cxlii. 8. Lord, let my prayer like incense rise. Ps. cxxxix. 9. O bless the Lord, my soul! His grace to thee proclaim. Ps. ciii. 10. Out of the depths of woe. Ps. cxxx. Sometimes "When from the depths of woe." 11. The world in condemnation lay. Redemption. 12. Where are the dead? In heaven or hell? The Living and the Dead. iii. Appeared in his Songs of Zion, 1822. 13. Give glory to God in the highest. Ps. xxix. 14. Glad was my heart to hear. Ps. cxxii. 15. God be merciful to me. Ps. lxix. 16. God is my strong salvation. Ps. xxvii. 17. Hasten, Lord, to my release. Ps. lxx. 18. Have mercy on me, O my God. Ps. li. 19. Hearken, Lord, to my complaints. Ps. xlii. 20. Heralds of creation cry. Ps. cxlviii. 21. How beautiful the sight. Ps. cxxxiii. 22. How precious are Thy thoughts of peace. Ps. cxxxix. 23. I love the Lord, He lent an ear. Ps. cxvi. 24. In time of tribulation. Ps. lxxvii. 25. Jehovah is great, and great be His praise. Ps. xlviii. Sometimes, "0 great is Jehovah, and great is His Name." 26. Judge me, O Lord, in righteousness. Ps. xliii. 27. Lift up your heads, ye gates, and wide. Ps.xxiv. 28. Lord, let me know mine [my] end. Ps. xxxi. 29. Of old, 0 God, Thine own right hand. Ps. lxxx. 30. O God, Thou art [my] the God alone. Ps. lxiii. 31. 0 Lord, our King, how excellent. Ps. viii. Sometimes, "0 Lord, how excellent is Thy name." 32. O my soul, with all thy powers. Ps. ciii. 33. One thing with all my soul's desire. Ps. xxvii. From this, "Grant me within Thy courts a place." 34. Searcher of hearts, to Thee are known. Ps. cxxxix. 35. Thank and praise Jehovah's name. Ps. cvii. 36. Thee will I praise, O Lord in light. Ps. cxxxviii. 37. The Lord is King; upon His throne. Ps. xciii. 38. The Lord is my Shepherd, no want shall I know. Ps. xxiii. 39. The tempter to my soul hath said. Ps. iii. 40. Thrice happy he who shuns the way. Ps. i. 41. Thy glory, Lord, the heavens declare. Ps. xix. 42. Thy law is perfect, Lord of light. Ps. xix. 43. Who make the Lord of hosts their tower. Ps. cxxv. 44. Yea, I will extol Thee. Ps. xxx. iv. Appeared in his Christian Psalmist. 1825. 45. Fall down, ye nations, and adore. Universal adoration of God desired. 46. Food, raiment, dwelling, health, and friends. The Family Altar. 47. Go where a foot hath never trod. Moses in the desert. Previously in the Leeds Congregational Collection, 1822. 48. Green pastures and clear streams. The Good Shepherd and His Flock. 49. Less than the least of all. Mercies acknowledged. 50. Not to the mount that burned with fire [flame]. Communion of Saints. 51. On the first Christian Sabbath eve. Easter Sunday Evening. 52. One prayer I have: all prayers in one. Resignation. 53. Our heavenly Father hear. The Lord's Prayer. 54. Return, my soul, unto thy rest. Rest in God. 55. Spirit of power and might, behold. The Spirit's renewing desired. 56. The Christian warrior, see him stand. The Christian Soldier. Sometimes, "Behold the Christian warrior stand." 57. The days and years of time are fled. Day of Judgment. 58. The glorious universe around. Unity. 59. The pure and peaceful mind. A Children's Prayer. 60. This is the day the Lord hath made (q. v.). Sunday. 61. Thy word, Almighty Lord. Close of Service. 62. What secret hand at morning light ? Morning. 63. While through this changing world we roam. Heaven. 64. Within these walls be peace. For Sunday Schools. v. Appeared in his Original Hymns, 1853. 65. Behold yon bright array. Opening a Place of Worship. 66. Behold the book whose leaves display. Holy Scriptures. 67. Come ye that fear the Lord. Confirmation. 68. Home, kindred, friends, and country, these. Farewell to a Missionary. 69. Let me go, the day is breaking. Jacob wrestling. 70. Not in Jerusalem alone. Consecration of a Church. 71. Praise the high and holy One. God the Creator. In common with most poets and hymnwriters, Montgomery strongly objected to any correction or rearrangement of his compositions. At the same time he did not hesitate to alter, rearrange, and amend the productions of others. The altered texts which appeared in Cotterill's Selections, 1819, and which in numerous instances are still retained in some of the best hymnbooks, as the "Rock of Ages," in its well-known form of three stanzas, and others of equal importance, were made principally by him for Cotterill's use. We have this confession under his own hand. As a poet, Montgomery stands well to the front; and as a writer of hymns he ranks in popularity with Wesley, Watts, Doddridge, Newton, and Cowper. His best hymns were written in his earlier years. In his old age he wrote much that was unworthy of his reputation. His finest lyrics are "Angels from the realms of glory," "Go to dark Gethsemane," "Hail to the Lord's Anointed," and "Songs of praise the angels sang." His "Prayer is the soul's sincere desire," is an expanded definition of prayer of great beauty; and his "Forever with the Lord" is full of lyric fire and deep feeling. The secrets of his power as a writer of hymns were manifold. His poetic genius was of a high order, higher than most who stand with him in the front rank of Christian poets. His ear for rhythm was exceedingly accurate and refined. His knowledge of Holy Scripture was most extensive. His religious views were broad and charitable. His devotional spirit was of the holiest type. With the faith of a strong man he united the beauty and simplicity of a child. Richly poetic without exuberance, dogmatic without uncharitableness, tender without sentimentality, elaborate without diffusiveness, richly musical without apparent effort, he has bequeathed to the Church of Christ wealth which could onlv have come from a true genius and a sanctified! heart. --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907)

Haldor Lillenas

1885 - 1959 Person Name: H. L. Author of "That will Be Heaven Enough for Me" in New Songs of Pentecost No. 3 Born: No­vem­ber 19, 1885, Stord Is­land (near Ber­gen), Nor­way. Died: Au­gust 18, 1959, As­pen, Co­lo­ra­do. Buried: Flor­al Hills Cem­e­te­ry, Kan­sas Ci­ty, Mis­so­uri. Pseudonyms-- Vir­gin­ia Rose Gold­en Laverne Gray Richard Hainsworth Rev. H. N. Lines Robert Whitmore Ferne Winters Lillenas em­i­grat­ed to Amer­i­ca as a child; his fam­i­ly set­tled first in South Da­ko­ta, then moved to Or­e­gon in 1889. He at­tend­ed Deets Pa­ci­fic Bi­ble Coll­ege in Los An­ge­les, Cal­i­for­nia (later re­named to Pa­sa­de­na Coll­ege); stu­died mu­sic at the Sie­gel-My­ers School of Mu­sic in Chi­ca­go, Il­li­nois; and re­ceived an hon­or­ary Doc­tor of Mu­sic de­gree from Ol­i­vet Na­za­rene Coll­ege. His first pas­tor­ate was in Lom­poc, Cal­i­for­nia, in 1910; he lat­er pas­tored in Redlands, Cal­i­for­nia, and In­dianapolis, In­diana. In 1924, he found­ed the Lil­le­nas Mu­sic Com­pa­ny (bought by the Na­za­rene Pub­lish­ing Com­pa­ny in 1930), and worked as an ed­it­or there un­til his re­tire­ment in 1950. Haldor mar­ried Ber­tha Mae Wil­son, a song­writ­er like him­self. He and Ber­tha were el­ders in the Church of the Na­za­rene. Hal­dor tra­veled as an evan­gel­ist, then pas­tored sev­er­al church­es, 1914-1924. In his life­time, he wrote some 4,000 hymns, and sup­plied songs for ma­ny evan­gel­ists. His works in­clude: Special Sac­red Songs, 1919 New Sac­red Songs Strains of Love Special Sac­red Songs No. 2 Sources: Hustad, p. 273 Schwanz, pp. 69-76 http://www.hymntime.com/tch/bio/l/i/l/lillenas_h.htm

E. A. Hoffman

1839 - 1929 Person Name: E. A. H. Author of "The home of peace and rest" in Celestial Showers No. 1, a collection of gospel songs used in Rev. I. Toliver's Meetings Elisha Hoffman (1839-1929) after graduating from Union Seminary in Pennsylvania was ordained in 1868. As a minister he was appointed to the circuit in Napoleon, Ohio in 1872. He worked with the Evangelical Association's publishing arm in Cleveland for eleven years. He served in many chapels and churches in Cleveland and in Grafton in the 1880s, among them Bethel Home for Sailors and Seamen, Chestnut Ridge Union Chapel, Grace Congregational Church and Rockport Congregational Church. In his lifetime he wrote more than 2,000 gospel songs including"Leaning on the everlasting arms" (1894). The fifty song books he edited include Pentecostal Hymns No. 1 and The Evergreen, 1873. Mary Louise VanDyke ============ Hoffman, Elisha Albright, author of "Have you been to Jesus for the cleansing power?" (Holiness desired), in I. D. Sankey's Sacred Songs and Solos, 1881, was born in Pennsylvania, May 7, 1839. --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology, Appendix, Part II (1907) ==============

Frank M. Davis

1839 - 1896 Composer of "[We are journeying on in our pilgrimage garb]" in Notes of Praise

John B. Vaughan

1862 - 1918 Author of "We Shall Know Each Other There" in The Cyber Hymnal John B. Vaughan (sometimes misspelled Vaughn), 1862-1918 Born: June 16, 1862, El­bert Coun­ty, Georg­ia. Died: July 18, 1918, Athens, Georg­ia. Buried: Oco­nee Hill Cem­e­te­ry, Athens, Georgia. Vaughan was a Gos­pel song writ­er and mu­sic pub­lish­er. At one time he taught at the South­ern De­vel­op­ment Nor­mal mu­sic school in Wa­co, Tex­as. Lyrics-- Beautiful Home Some­where There’ll Be Room Enough ’Twill Be Glo­ry By and By We Shall See the King --http://www.hymntime.com --http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=23551328

J. H. Tenney

1840 - 1918 Person Name: J. H. T. Composer of "[By and by, when our pilgrimage is over]" in Celestial Showers No. 1, a collection of gospel songs used in Rev. I. Toliver's Meetings John Harrison Tenney, 1840-1918 Born: No­vem­ber 22, 1840, Row­ley, Mass­a­chu­setts. Born just af­ter the pre­si­den­tial cam­paign of "Tip­pe­ca­noe and Ty­ler, too," Ten­ney was named af­ter Amer­i­can pre­si­dent Will­iam Hen­ry Har­ri­son. A dea­con in the Con­gre­ga­tion­al Church in Line­brook, Mass­a­chu­setts, he ed­it­ed or was as­so­ci­ate ed­it­or of over 30 books, and con­trib­ut­ed to hun­dreds more. His works in­clude: Amer­i­can Male Choir Temperance Jew­els, with Eli­sha Hoff­man (Bos­ton, Mass­a­chu­setts: Ol­iv­er Dit­son & Com­pa­ny, 1879) Bells of Vic­to­ry, with Eli­sha Hoff­man (Bos­ton, Mass­a­chu­setts: Oliv­er Dit­son & Com­pa­ny, 1888) Gems of Gos­pel Song Golden Sun­beams Sharon’s Dewy Rose Songs of Faith Shining Light Songs of Joy Sparkling and Bright Spiritual Songs, Nos. 1 and 2 Sweet Fields of Eden The Bea­con Light The Sing­ing School Ban­ner The An­them Of­fer­ing The Amer­i­can An­them Book The Crown of Praise Sources-- Hall, pp. 219-22 Music-- Asilomar Bogotá Beyond the Swell­ing Flood Cancún Come to Je­sus Ever Will I Pray Hallowed Hour of Pray­er Jesus Is Pass­ing This Way Jubilate! My An­chor Is Hold­ing Nothing Be­tween Onward Christ­ian Sol­diers Sabbath Bell San Fran­cis­co We’ll Ne­ver Say Good­bye Where Will You Spend Eter­ni­ty? --www.hymntime.com/tch

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