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Search Results

All:prayer

Looking for other resources related to Prayer? Check out PreachingandWorship.org.

Texts

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Sweet Hour of Prayer

Author: William Walford Meter: 8.8.8.8 Appears in 1,151 hymnals First Line: Sweet hour of prayer! sweet hour of prayer Lyrics: 1. Sweet hour of prayer! sweet hour of prayer! that calls me from ... , sweet hour of prayer! 2. Sweet hour of prayer! sweet hour of ... , sweet hour of prayer! 3. Sweet hour of prayer! sweet hour of ... prayer! thy wings shall my ... Topics: Sanctifiying and Perfecting Grace Prayer, Trust, Hope; Prayer Used With Tune: SWEET HOUR
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O Lord, Hear My Prayer

Author: Taizé Community Appears in 37 hymnals First Line: O Lord, hear my prayer, O Lord, hear my prayer
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Be Thou My Vision

Author: Mary E. Byrne; Eleanor H. Hull Meter: 10.10.10.10 Appears in 130 hymnals First Line: Be thou my vision, O Lord of my heart Topics: liturgical Prayer Songs Text Sources: Ancient Irish; Irish, ca. 700

Tunes

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Tune authorities
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SWEET HOUR

Composer: William B. Bradbury Meter: 8.8.8.8 Appears in 227 hymnals Tune Key: D Major Incipit: 13455 67165 33212 Used With Text: Sweet Hour of Prayer
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PENITENT

Composer: William Farley Smith Meter: Irregular Appears in 26 hymnals Tune Sources: Afro-American spiritual Tune Key: G Major Incipit: 33313 21111 12233 Used With Text: It's Me, It's Me, O Lord (Standing in the Need of Prayer)
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GREGORIAN

Composer: Lowell Mason Meter: Irregular Appears in 7 hymnals Tune Key: E Flat Major Incipit: 32334 32332 11232 Used With Text: The Lord's Prayer

Instances

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Published text-tune combinations (hymns) from specific hymnals
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Blessed Hour of Prayer

Author: Fanny J. Crosby Hymnal: Christ in Song #270 (1908) First Line: 'Tis the blessed hour of prayer, when our hearts lowly bend Lyrics: ... the blessed hour of prayer, when our hearts lowly ... Blessed hour of prayer, Blessed hour of prayer, What a ... the blessed hour of prayer, when the Saviour draws ... the blessed hour of prayer, when the tempted and ... the blessed hour of prayer, trusting Him we ... Topics: Christ Prayer; Living His Life Prayer; Living His Life Prayer and Testimony Meeting; Living His Life Prayer; Living His Life Prayer and Testimony Meeting; Living His Life Prayer; Christ Prayer and Testimony Meeting; Christ Prayer; Christ Prayer and Testimony Meeting; Christ Prayer; Christ Prayer and Testimony Meeting; Christ Prayer; Christ Prayer and Testimony Meeting; Christ Prayer; Christ Prayer and Testimony Meeting; Christ Prayer; Christ Prayer and Testimony Meeting; Living His Life Prayer and Testimony Meeting Tune Title: ['Tis the blessed hour of prayer, when our hearts lowly bend]
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'Tis the Blessed Hour of Prayer

Author: Fanny J. Crosby Hymnal: Hymns of Faith #93 (1980) Refrain First Line: Blessed hour of prayer Lyrics: ... the blessèd hour of prayer, when our hearts lowly ... Blessèd hour of prayer, Blessèd hour of prayer: What a ... the blessèd hour of prayer, when the Savior draws ... the blessèd hour of prayer, when the tempted and ... the blessèd hour of prayer, trusting Him we ... Topics: Prayer Hymns about; Prayer Hymns about Scripture: Psalm 91:15 Tune Title: ['Tis the blessed hour of prayer]
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'Tis the Blessed Hour of Prayer

Author: Fanny J. Crosby Hymnal: Favorite Hymns of Praise #118 (1967) Refrain First Line: Blessed hour of prayer Lyrics: ... the blessèd hour of prayer, when our hearts lowly ... Blessèd hour of prayer, Blessèd hour of prayer; What a ... the blessèd hour of prayer, when the Savior draws ... the blessèd hour of prayer, when the tempted and ... the blessèd hour of prayer, trusting Him we ... Topics: Prayer Hymns about; Prayer Hymns about Tune Title: ['Tis the blessed hour of prayer]

People

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Authors, composers, editors, etc.

Orlando Gibbons

1583 - 1625 Person Name: Orlando Gibbons (1583-1625) Composer (bass) of "SONG 67" in Hymns for Today's Church (2nd ed.) Orlando Gibbons (baptised 25 December 1583 – 5 June 1625) was an English composer, virginalist and organist of the late Tudor and early Jacobean periods. He was a leading composer in the England of his day. Gibbons was born in Cambridge and christened at Oxford the same year – thus appearing in Oxford church records. Between 1596 and 1598 he sang in the Choir of King's College, Cambridge, where his brother Edward Gibbons (1568–1650), eldest of the four sons of William Gibbons, was master of the choristers. The second brother Ellis Gibbons (1573–1603) was also a promising composer, but died young. Orlando entered the university in 1598 and achieved the degree of Bachelor of Music in 1606. James I appointed him a Gentleman of the Chapel Royal, where he served as an organist from at least 1615 until his death. In 1623 he became senior organist at the Chapel Royal, with Thomas Tomkins as junior organist. He also held positions as keyboard player in the privy chamber of the court of Prince Charles (later King Charles I), and organist at Westminster Abbey. He died at age 41 in Canterbury of apoplexy, and a monument to him was built in Canterbury Cathedral. A suspicion immediately arose that Gibbons had died of the plague, which was rife in England that year. Two physicians who had been present at his death were ordered to make a report, and performed an autopsy, the account of which survives in The National Archives: We whose names are here underwritten: having been called to give our counsels to Mr. Orlando Gibbons; in the time of his late and sudden sickness, which we found in the beginning lethargical, or a profound sleep; out of which, we could never recover him, neither by inward nor outward medicines, & then instantly he fell in most strong, & sharp convulsions; which did wring his mouth up to his ears, & his eyes were distorted, as though they would have been thrust out of his head & then suddenly he lost both speech, sight and hearing, & so grew apoplectical & lost the whole motion of every part of his body, & so died. Then here upon (his death being so sudden) rumours were cast out that he did die of the plague, whereupon we . . . caused his body to be searched by certain women that were sworn to deliver the truth, who did affirm that they never saw a fairer corpse. Yet notwithstanding we to give full satisfaction to all did cause the skull to be opened in our presence & we carefully viewed the body, which we found also to be very clean without any show or spot of any contagious matter. In the brain we found the whole & sole cause of his sickness namely a great admirable blackness & syderation in the outside of the brain. Within the brain (being opened) there did issue out abundance of water intermixed with blood & this we affirm to be the only cause of his sudden death. His death was a shock to peers and the suddenness of his passing drew comment more for the haste of his burial – and of its location at Canterbury rather than the body being returned to London. His wife, Elizabeth, died a little over a year later, aged in her mid-30s, leaving Orlando's eldest brother, Edward, to care for the children left orphans by this event. Of these children only the eldest son, Christopher Gibbons, went on to become a musician. One of the most versatile English composers of his time, Gibbons wrote a quantity of keyboard works, around thirty fantasias for viols, a number of madrigals (the best-known being "The Silver Swan"), and many popular verse anthems. His choral music is distinguished by his complete mastery of counterpoint, combined with his wonderful gift for melody. Perhaps his most well known verse anthem is This is the record of John, which sets an Advent text for solo countertenor or tenor, alternating with full chorus. The soloist is required to demonstrate considerable technical facility at points, and the work at once expresses the rhetorical force of the text, whilst never being demonstrative or bombastic. He also produced two major settings of Evensong, the Short Service and the Second Service. The former includes a beautifully expressive Nunc dimittis, while the latter is an extended composition, combining verse and full sections. Gibbons's full anthems include the expressive O Lord, in thy wrath, and the Ascension Day anthem O clap your hands together for eight voices. He contributed six pieces to the first printed collection of keyboard music in England, Parthenia (to which he was by far the youngest of the three contributors), published in about 1611. Gibbons's surviving keyboard output comprises some 45 pieces. The polyphonic fantasia and dance forms are the best represented genres. Gibbons's writing exhibits full mastery of three- and four-part counterpoint. Most of the fantasias are complex, multisectional pieces, treating multiple subjects imitatively. Gibbons's approach to melody in both fantasias and dances features a capability for almost limitless development of simple musical ideas, on display in works such as Pavane in D minor and Lord Salisbury's Pavan and Galliard. In the 20th century, the Canadian pianist Glenn Gould championed Gibbons's music, and named him as his favorite composer. Gould wrote of Gibbons's hymns and anthems: "ever since my teen-age years this music ... has moved me more deeply than any other sound experience I can think of." In one interview, Gould compared Gibbons to Beethoven and Webern: ...despite the requisite quota of scales and shakes in such half-hearted virtuoso vehicles as the Salisbury Galliard, one is never quite able to counter the impression of music of supreme beauty that lacks its ideal means of reproduction. Like Beethoven in his last quartets, or Webern at almost any time, Gibbons is an artist of such intractable commitment that, in the keyboard field, at least, his works work better in one's memory, or on paper, than they ever can through the intercession of a sounding-board. To this day, Gibbons's obit service is commemorated every year in King's College Chapel, Cambridge. --wikipedia.org

George C. Stebbins

1846 - 1945 Person Name: Geo. C. Stebbins Composer of "[Saviour, breathe an evening blessing]" in Sacred Songs No. 1

W. A. Ogden

1841 - 1897 Person Name: W. A. O. Composer of "[Response After Prayer]" in The Gospel Chorus William A. Ogden, 1841-1897 Born: Oc­to­ber 10, 1841, Frank­lin Coun­ty, Ohio. Died: Oc­to­ber 14, 1897, To­le­do, Ohio. When Ogden was six years old, his fam­i­ly moved to In­di­a­na. He began stu­dy­ing mu­sic in lo­cal sing­ing schools at age 8, and could read church mu­sic fair­ly well by age 10. A lit­tle la­ter, he could write a mel­o­dy by hear­ing it sung or played. When he was 18, he be­came a chor­ist­er in his home church. At the out­break of the Amer­i­can ci­vil war, Og­den en­list­ed in the 30th In­di­a­na Vol­un­teer In­fant­ry. Duri­ng the war he or­gan­ized a male choir, which be­came well known throug­hout the Ar­my of the Cum­ber­land. After the war, Og­den re­turned home and re­sumed his mu­sic­al stu­dies. Among his teach­ers were Lowell Mason, Thom­as Hast­ings, E. E. Baily, and B. F. Bak­er, pres­i­dent of the Bos­ton Mu­sic School. As his skills de­vel­oped, Ogden is­sued his first song book, The Sil­ver Song, in 1870; it be­came im­mense­ly pop­u­lar, sell­ing 500,000 co­pies. He went on to pub­lish num­er­ous other song books. In ad­di­tion to com­pos­ing, Og­den taught at ma­ny schools in the Unit­ed States and Ca­na­da. In 1887, he be­came sup­er­in­tend­ent of mu­sic in the pub­lic schools of To­le­do, Ohio. His works in­clude: New Sil­ver Songs for Sun­day School (Tole­do, Ohio: W. W. Whit­ney, 1872) Crown of Life (Tole­do, Ohio: W. W. Whit­ney, 1875) Notes of Vic­to­ry, with Ed­mund Lo­renz (Day­ton, Ohio: Unit­ed Breth­ren Publishing Com­pa­ny, 1885) The Way of Life (Tole­do, Ohio: W. W. Whit­ney, 1886) Gathered Jew­els (Tole­do, Ohio: W. W. Whit­ney, 1886) Lyrics-- Baptize Us Anew Everlasting Life He Is Able to De­li­ver Thee I’ve a Mess­age from the Lord On a Christ­mas Morn­ing Ring Out the Bells for Christ­mas Scattering Pre­cious Seed Seeking the Lost Where He Leads I’ll Fol­low Working, O Christ, with Thee Music-- All Things Are Rea­dy Bright For­ev­er­more, The Bring Them In Clark’s Grove Come to the Feast Eye of Faith, The Gathering Home Gracious Re­deem­er, The More Than Con­quer­ors Star in the East Steer To­ward the Light There Is Joy We’ll Work --hymntime.com/tch ============================== Ogden, W. A., is the author of “The blessed Saviour died for me, On the Cross" (Good Friday) and of the music thereto in I. D. Sankey's Sacred Songs and Solos. --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology, Appendix, Part II (1907) ============================== The DNAH Archives also has a profile of Ogden from the Portrait and biographical record of city of Toledo and Lucas and Wood counties, Ohio (1895) and a transcription of the Toledo News-Bee article of 16 October 1897 describing how the city paid tribute to Ogden at his death with resolutions, school closings, and funeral program.

Hymnals

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Published hymn books and other collections

Small Church Music

Editors: James Edmeston Description: The SmallChurchMusic site was commenced in 2006 grew out of the requests from those struggling to provide suitable music for their services and meetings. Rev. Clyde McLennan was ordained in mid 1960’s and was a pastor in many small Australian country areas, and therefore was acutely aware of this music problem. Having also been trained as a Pipe Organist, recordings on site (which are a subset of the smallchurchmusic.com site) are all actually played by Clyde, and also include piano and piano with organ versions. All recordings are in MP3 format. Churches all around the world use the recordings, with downloads averaging over 60,000 per month. The recordings normally have an introduction, several verses and a slowdown on the last verse. Users are encouraged to use software: Audacity (http://www.audacityteam.org) or Song Surgeon (http://songsurgeon.com) (see http://scm-audacity.weebly.com for more information) to adjust the MP3 number of verses, tempo and pitch to suit their local needs. Copyright notice: Rev. Clyde McLennan, performer in this collection, has assigned his performer rights in this collection to Hymnary.org. Non-commercial use of these recordings is permitted. For permission to use them for any other purposes, please contact manager@hymnary.org. Home/Music(smallchurchmusic.com) List SongsAlphabetically List Songsby Meter List Songs byTune Name About  
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Songs for the Service of Prayer

Publication Date: 1880 Publisher: F. H. Revell Publication Place: Chicago Editors: R. S. Thain; F. H. Revell
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Sacred Melodies

Publication Date: 1836 Publisher: Published by the Trustees of the Freewill Baptist Connection Publication Place: Dover

Products

Moderately Easy • For Pentecost and all year 'round, Lani Smith's "Reflections on the Holy Spirit"…
Designed to support the lighting of the Advent candles this includes a choral opening followed by a…
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