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Psalm 15: Within thy tabernacle, Lord

Meter: 8.6.8.6 Appears in 18 hymnals First Line: Within thy tabernacle, Lord Lyrics: Within thy tabernacle, Lord, who shall abide with ... Scripture: Psalm 15

Lord, who shall abide in thy tabernacle?

Appears in 8 hymnals Topics: Prose Psalms Scripture: Psalm 15 Used With Tune: [Lord, who shall abide in thy tabernacle?]

A Song of the Temple

Author: Richard Rolle; Frances Bevan Appears in 1 hymnal First Line: In Thy tabernacle, Lord, I offer Lyrics: In Thy tabernacle, Lord, I offer Sacrifice of ...

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TABERNACLE

Composer: Phillip Landgrave Meter: 8.8.8.6 Appears in 3 hymnals Tune Key: E Flat Major Incipit: 34531 71255 54445 Used With Text: Just As I Am
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TABERNACLE

Composer: Paul Rader Meter: 8.7.8.7 with refrain Appears in 16 hymnals Tune Key: B Flat Major Incipit: 56532 17656 51232 Used With Text: We Are Gathered for Thy Blessing

TALLIS'S ORDINAL

Composer: Thomas Tallis Meter: 8.6.8.6 Appears in 136 hymnals Tune Key: E Flat Major Incipit: 13455 66551 76651 Used With Text: Within Thy tabernacle, Lord

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Just As I Am

Author: Charlotte Elliott Hymnal: Baptist Hymnal 1991 #303 (1991) Meter: 8.8.8.6 First Line: Just as I am, without one plea Lyrics: 1. Just as I am, without one plea, But that thy blood was shed for me, And that Thou bidd'st me come to Thee, I lamb of God, I come. 2. Just as I am, and waiting not To rid my soul of one dark blot, To Thee whose blood can cleanse each spot, O Lamb of God, ... Scripture: John 6:37 Tune Title: TABERNACLE
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We Are Gathered for Thy Blessing

Author: Paul Rader Hymnal: Hymns for the Living Church #190 (1974) Meter: 8.7.8.7 with refrain Refrain First Line: Spirit, now melt and move all of our hears with love Lyrics: 1 We are gathered for Thy blessing, We will wait upon our God; We will trust in Him who loved us, And who bought us with His blood. Refrain: Spirit, now melt and move All of our hearts with love, Breathe on us from above With old-time pow'r. 2 We will ... Topics: Love God's Love; Power, Spiritual Scripture: Matthew 3:11 Tune Title: TABERNACLE
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Psalm 15: Within thy tabernacle, Lord

Hymnal: Scottish Psalter and Paraphrases #P16 (1800) Meter: 8.6.8.6 First Line: Within thy tabernacle, Lord Lyrics: Within thy tabernacle, Lord, who shall abide with ... Scripture: Psalm 15 Languages: English

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Thomas Tallis

1505 - 1585 Composer of "TALLIS'S ORDINAL" in The Hymnary of the United Church of Canada Thomas Tallis (c. 1505 – 23 November 1585) was an English composer. Tallis flourished as a church musician in 16th century Tudor England. He occupies a primary place in anthologies of English church music, and is considered one of England's greatest early composers. He is honoured for his original voice in English musicianship. No contemporary portrait of Tallis survives: the earliest, painted by Gerard van der Gucht, dates from 150 years after Tallis died, and there is no certainty that it is a likeness. Little is known about Tallis's early life, but there seems to be agreement that he was born in the early 16th century, toward the close of the reign of Henry VII. Little is known about Tallis's childhood and his significance with music at that age. However, there are suggestions that he was a child of the chapel royal St. James's palace, the same singing establishment which he later went to as a man. His first known appointment to a musical position was as organist of Dover Priory in 1530–31, a Benedictine priory at Dover (now Dover College) in 1532. His career took him to London, then (probably in the autumn of 1538) to the Augustinian abbey of Holy Cross at Waltham until the abbey was dissolved in 1540. Tallis acquired a volume at the dissolution of the monastery of Waltham Holy Cross and preserved it; one of the treatises in it was by Leonel Power, and the treatise itself prohibits consecutive unisons, fifths, and octaves. Tallis's next post was at Canterbury Cathedral. He was next sent to Court as Gentleman of the Chapel Royal in 1543 (which later became a Protestant establishment), where he composed and performed for Henry VIII, Edward VI (1547–1553), Queen Mary (1553–1558), and Queen Elizabeth I (1558 until Tallis died in 1585). Throughout his service to successive monarchs as organist and composer, Tallis avoided the religious controversies that raged around him, though, like William Byrd, he stayed an "unreformed Roman Catholic." Tallis was capable of switching the style of his compositions to suit the different monarchs' vastly different demands. Among other important composers of the time, including Christopher Tye and Robert White, Tallis stood out. Walker observes, "He had more versatility of style than either, and his general handling of his material was more consistently easy and certain." Tallis was also a teacher, not only of William Byrd, but also of Elway Bevin, an organist of Bristol Cathedral and gentleman of the Chapel Royal. Tallis married around 1552; his wife, Joan, outlived him by four years. They apparently had no children. Late in his life he lived in Greenwich, possibly close to the royal palace: a local tradition holds that he lived on Stockwell Street. Queen Mary granted Tallis a lease on a manor in Kent that provided a comfortable annual income. In 1575, Queen Elizabeth granted to him and William Byrd a 21-year monopoly for polyphonic music and a patent to print and publish music, which was one of the first arrangements of that type in the country. Tallis's monopoly covered 'set songe or songes in parts', and he composed in English, Latin, French, Italian, or other tongues as long as they served for music in the Church or chamber. Tallis had exclusive rights to print any music, in any language. He and William Byrd were the only ones allowed to use the paper that was used in printing music. Tallis and Byrd used their monopoly to produce Cantiones quae ab argumento sacrae vocantur but the piece did not sell well and they appealed to Queen Elizabeth for her support. People were naturally wary of their new publications, and it certainly did not help their case that they were both avowed Roman Catholics. Not only that, they were strictly forbidden to sell any imported music. "We straightly by the same forbid...to be brought out of any forren Realmes...any songe or songes made and printed in any foreen countrie." Also, Byrd and Tallis were not given "the rights to music type fonts, printing patents were not under their command, and they didn't actually own a printing press." Tallis retained respect during a succession of opposing religious movements and deflected the violence that claimed Catholics and Protestants alike. Thomas Tallis died peacefully in his house in Greenwich in November 1585. Most historians agree that he died on the twenty-third. He was buried in the chancel of the parish of St Alfege's Church in Greenwich. The earliest surviving works by Tallis, Salve intemerata virgo, Ave rosa sine spinis and Ave Dei patris filia are devotional antiphons to the Virgin Mary, which were used outside the liturgy and were cultivated in England until the fall of Cardinal Wolsey. Henry VIII's break with Roman Catholicism in 1534 and the rise of Thomas Cranmer noticeably influenced the style of music written. Texts became largely confined to the liturgy. The writing of Tallis and his contemporaries became less florid. Tallis's Mass for four voices is marked with tendencies toward a syllabic (which is a setting of text where each syllable is sung to one pitch) and chordal (consisting of or emphasising chords) style and a diminished use of melisma. Tallis provides a rhythmic variety and differentiation of moods depending on the meaning of his texts. Tallis helped found a relationship that was specific to the combining of words and music. He also wrote several excellent Lutheran chorales. The reformed Anglican liturgy was inaugurated during the short reign of Edward VI (1547–53), and Tallis was one of the first church musicians to write anthems set to English words, although Latin continued to be used. The Catholic Mary Tudor set about undoing the religious reforms of the preceding decades. Following her accession in 1553, the Roman Rite was restored and compositional style reverted to the elaborate writing prevalent early in the century. Two of Tallis's major works, Gaude gloriosa Dei Mater and the Christmas Mass Puer natus est nobis are believed to be from this period. Only Puer natus est nobis can be accurately dated to 1554. As was the prevailing practice, these pieces were intended to exalt the image of the Queen as well as to praise the Mother of God. Some of Tallis's works were compiled and printed in the Mulliner Book by Thomas Mulliner before Queen Elizabeth's reign, and may have been used by the Queen herself when she was younger. Elizabeth succeeded her half-sister in 1558, and the Act of Settlement in the following year abolished the Roman Liturgy and firmly established the Book of Common Prayer. Composers at court resumed writing English anthems, although the practice of setting Latin texts continued, growing more peripheral over time. The mood of the country in the beginning of Elizabeth's reign leant toward the puritan, which discouraged the liturgical polyphony. Tallis wrote nine psalm chant tunes for four voices for Archbishop Parker's Psalter, published in 1567. One of the nine tunes, the "Third Mode Melody", inspired the composition of Fantasia on a Theme of Thomas Tallis by Ralph Vaughan Williams in 1910. Tallis's better-known works from the Elizabethan years include his settings of the Lamentations (of Jeremiah the Prophet)for the Holy Week services and the unique motet Spem in alium written for eight five-voice choirs. Tallis is mostly remembered for his role in composing office hymns and this motet, Spem in alium. Too often we forget to look at his compositions for other monarchs; several of Tallis's anthems written in Edward's reign such as his "If ye love me," ought to be considered on the same level as his Elizabethan works. This is partially because we do not have all of his works from previous periods; eleven of eighteen Latin-texted pieces by Tallis from Elizabeth's reign were published, "which ensured their survival in a way not available to the earlier material." Toward the end of his life, Tallis resisted the musical development seen in his younger contemporaries such as William Byrd, who embraced compositional complexity and adopted texts built by combining disparate biblical extracts. Tallis's experiments during this time period were considered rather unusual. Tallis was content to draw his texts from the Liturgy and wrote for the worship services in the Chapel Royal. Tallis composed during a difficult period during the conflict between Catholicism and Protestantism, and his music often displays characteristics of the turmoil. --en.wikipedia.org (excerpts)

W. A. Ogden

1841 - 1897 Composer of "[Within thy tabernacle, Lord]" in Bible Songs William A. Ogden, 1841-1897 Born: Oc­to­ber 10, 1841, Frank­lin Coun­ty, Ohio. Died: Oc­to­ber 14, 1897, To­le­do, Ohio. When Ogden was six years old, his fam­i­ly moved to In­di­a­na. He began stu­dy­ing mu­sic in lo­cal sing­ing schools at age 8, and could read church mu­sic fair­ly well by age 10. A lit­tle la­ter, he could write a mel­o­dy by hear­ing it sung or played. When he was 18, he be­came a chor­ist­er in his home church. At the out­break of the Amer­i­can ci­vil war, Og­den en­list­ed in the 30th In­di­a­na Vol­un­teer In­fant­ry. Duri­ng the war he or­gan­ized a male choir, which be­came well known throug­hout the Ar­my of the Cum­ber­land. After the war, Og­den re­turned home and re­sumed his mu­sic­al stu­dies. Among his teach­ers were Lowell Mason, Thom­as Hast­ings, E. E. Baily, and B. F. Bak­er, pres­i­dent of the Bos­ton Mu­sic School. As his skills de­vel­oped, Ogden is­sued his first song book, The Sil­ver Song, in 1870; it be­came im­mense­ly pop­u­lar, sell­ing 500,000 co­pies. He went on to pub­lish num­er­ous other song books. In ad­di­tion to com­pos­ing, Og­den taught at ma­ny schools in the Unit­ed States and Ca­na­da. In 1887, he be­came sup­er­in­tend­ent of mu­sic in the pub­lic schools of To­le­do, Ohio. His works in­clude: New Sil­ver Songs for Sun­day School (Tole­do, Ohio: W. W. Whit­ney, 1872) Crown of Life (Tole­do, Ohio: W. W. Whit­ney, 1875) Notes of Vic­to­ry, with Ed­mund Lo­renz (Day­ton, Ohio: Unit­ed Breth­ren Publishing Com­pa­ny, 1885) The Way of Life (Tole­do, Ohio: W. W. Whit­ney, 1886) Gathered Jew­els (Tole­do, Ohio: W. W. Whit­ney, 1886) Lyrics-- Baptize Us Anew Everlasting Life He Is Able to De­li­ver Thee I’ve a Mess­age from the Lord On a Christ­mas Morn­ing Ring Out the Bells for Christ­mas Scattering Pre­cious Seed Seeking the Lost Where He Leads I’ll Fol­low Working, O Christ, with Thee Music-- All Things Are Rea­dy Bright For­ev­er­more, The Bring Them In Clark’s Grove Come to the Feast Eye of Faith, The Gathering Home Gracious Re­deem­er, The More Than Con­quer­ors Star in the East Steer To­ward the Light There Is Joy We’ll Work --hymntime.com/tch ============================== Ogden, W. A., is the author of “The blessed Saviour died for me, On the Cross" (Good Friday) and of the music thereto in I. D. Sankey's Sacred Songs and Solos. --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology, Appendix, Part II (1907) ============================== The DNAH Archives also has a profile of Ogden from the Portrait and biographical record of city of Toledo and Lucas and Wood counties, Ohio (1895) and a transcription of the Toledo News-Bee article of 16 October 1897 describing how the city paid tribute to Ogden at his death with resolutions, school closings, and funeral program.

Samuel Medley

1738 - 1799 Author of "His Loving-Kindness" in Tabernacle Hymns No. 3 Medley, Samuel, born June 23, 1738, at Cheshunt, Herts, where his father kept a school. He received a good education; but not liking the business to which he was apprenticed, he entered the Royal Navy. Having been severely wounded in a battle with the French fleet off Port Lagos, in 1759, he was obliged to retire from active service. A sermon by Dr. Watts, read to him about this time, led to his conversion. He joined the Baptist Church in Eagle Street, London, then under the care of Dr. Gifford, and shortly afterwards opened a school, which for several years he conducted with great success. Having begun to preach, he received, in 1767, a call to become pastor of the Baptist church at Watford. Thence, in 1772, he removed to Byrom Street, Liverpool, where he gathered a large congregation, and for 27 years was remarkably popular and useful. After a long and painful illness he died July 17, 1799. Most of Medley's hymns were first printed on leaflets or in magazines (the Gospel Magazine being one). They appeared in book form as:— (1) Hymns, &c. Bradford, 1785. This contains 42 hymns. (2) Hymns on Select Portions of Scripture by the Rev. Mr. Medley. 2nd ed. Bristol. W. Pine. 1785. This contains 34 hymns, and differs much from the Bradford edition both in the text and in the order of the hymns. (3) An enlargement of the same in 1787. (4) A small collection of new Hymns, London, 1794. This contains 23 hymns. (5) Hymns. The Public Worship and Private Devotion of True Christians Assisted in some thoughts in Verse; principally drawn from Select Passages of the Word of God. By Samuel Medley. London. Printed for J. Johnson. 1800. A few of his hymns are also found in a Collection for the use of All Denominations, published in London in 1782. Medley's hymns have been very popular in his own denomination, particularly among the more Calvinistic churches. In Denham's Selections there are 48, and in J. Stevens's Selections, 30. Their charm consists less in their poetry than in the warmth and occasional pathos with which they give expression to Christian experience. In most of them also there is a refrain in the last line of each verse which is often effective. Those in common use include:— 1. Come, join ye saints, with heart and voice. (1800). Complete in Christ. 2. Death is no more among our foes. Easter. 3. Eternal Sovereign Lord of all. (1789). Praise for Providential Care. 4. Far, far beyond these lower skies. (1789). Jesus, the Forerunner. 5. Father of mercies, God of love, whose kind, &c. (1789.) New Year. 6. Great God, today Thy grace impart. Sermon. 7. Hear, gracious God! a sinner's cry. (1789). Lent. 8. In heaven the rapturous song began. Christmas. 9. Jesus, engrave it on my heart. (1789). Jesus, Needful to all. 10. Mortals, awake, with angels join. (1782). Christmas. 11. My soul, arise in joyful lays. (1789). Joy in God. 12. Now, in a song of grateful praise. Praise to Jesus. In the Gospel Magazine, June, 1776. 13. O could I speak the matchless worth. (1789.) Praise of Jesus. 14. O for a bright celestial ray. Lent. 15. O God, Thy mercy, vast and free. (1800). Dedication of Self to God. 16. O let us tell the matchless love. Praise to Jesus. 17. O what amazing words of grace. (1789). Foutain of Living Waters. 18. Saints die, and we should gently weep. (1800). Death and Burial. From his "Dearest of Names, Our Lord and King." 19. See a poor sinner, dearest Lord. Lent. 20. Sing the dear Saviour's glorious fame. (1789). Jesus the Breaker of bonds. In 1800 a Memoir of Medley was published by his son, which is regarded by members of the family now living as authoritative. But in 1833 appeared another Memoir by Medley's daughter Sarah, to which are appended 52 hymns for use on Sacramental occasions. These she gives as her father's. But 8 of them are undoubtedly by Thos. Kelly, published by him in 1815, and reprinted in subsequent editions of his Hymns. The remainder are by Medley. Nearly all of these 52 hymns (both Medley's and Kelly's) have been altered in order to adapt them to Sacramental use. In Sarah Medley's volume, Kelly's hymns all follow one another, and three of them are in a metre which Medley apparently never used. What could have been Sarah Medley's motive in all this it is hard to divine. She is said to have been a clever, though unamiable woman, and was herself the author of a small volume of Poems published in 1807. In the Memoir she does not conceal her hatred of her brother. [Rev. W. R. Stevenson, M.A.] -- John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907)

Hymnals

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The Tabernacle Hymns

Publication Date: 1918 Publisher: Tabernacle Pub. Co. Publication Place: Chicago Editors: D. B. Towner; Arthur W. McKee; Tabernacle Pub. Co.

Tabernacle Hymns No. 3

Publication Date: 1931 Publisher: Tabernacle Publishing Company Publication Place: Chicago, Ill. Editors: Tabernacle Publishing Company

Tabernacle Hymns Number Four

Publication Date: 1960 Publisher: Tabernacle Publishing Company Publication Place: Chicago

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