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E. A. Hoffman

1839 - 1929 Person Name: Elisha A. Hoffman Hymnal Number: 837 Author of "What a Fellowship, What a Joy Divine (Leaning on the Everlasting Arms)" in Glory to God Elisha Hoffman (1839-1929) after graduating from Union Seminary in Pennsylvania was ordained in 1868. As a minister he was appointed to the circuit in Napoleon, Ohio in 1872. He worked with the Evangelical Association's publishing arm in Cleveland for eleven years. He served in many chapels and churches in Cleveland and in Grafton in the 1880s, among them Bethel Home for Sailors and Seamen, Chestnut Ridge Union Chapel, Grace Congregational Church and Rockport Congregational Church. In his lifetime he wrote more than 2,000 gospel songs including"Leaning on the everlasting arms" (1894). The fifty song books he edited include Pentecostal Hymns No. 1 and The Evergreen, 1873. Mary Louise VanDyke ============ Hoffman, Elisha Albright, author of "Have you been to Jesus for the cleansing power?" (Holiness desired), in I. D. Sankey's Sacred Songs and Solos, 1881, was born in Pennsylvania, May 7, 1839. --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology, Appendix, Part II (1907) ==============

Horatio Gates Spafford

1828 - 1888 Person Name: Horatio G. Spafford Hymnal Number: 840 Author of "When Peace like a River (It Is Well with My Soul)" in Glory to God

John S. B. Monsell

1811 - 1875 Person Name: John Samuel Bewley Monsell Hymnal Number: 846 Author of "Fight the Good Fight" in Glory to God Monsell, John Samuel Bewley, L.L.D., son of Thomas Bewley Monsell, Archdeacon of Londonderry, was born at St. Columb's, Londonderry, March 2,1811, and educated at Trinity College, Dublin (B.A. 1832, LL.D. 1856). Taking Holy Orders in 1834, "he was successively Chaplain to Bishop Mant, Chancellor of the diocese of Connor, Rector of Ramoan, Vicar of Egham, diocese Worcester, and Rector of St. Nicholas's, Guildford. He died in consequence of a fall from the roof of his church, which was in the course of rebuilding, April 9, 1875. His prose works include Our New Vicar, 1867; The Winton Church Catechist, &c. His poetical works are:— (1) Hymns and Miscellaneous Poems, Dublin, W. Curry, Jun., & Co., 1837; (2) Parish Musings, or Devotional Poems, 1850; (3) Spiritual Songs for the Sundays and Holy Days throughout the Year. 1857 (People's Ed., 1875); (4) His Presence, not His Memory, 1855, 1858; (5) Hymns of Love and Praise for the Church's Year, 1863 (2nd ed. 1866); (6) The Passing Bell; Ode to The Nightingales, and Other Poems, 1867; (7) Litany Hymns, 1869; (8) The Parish Hymnal after the Order of The Book of Common Prayer, 1873; (9)Watches by the Cross, 1874; (10) Simon the Cyrenian; and Other Poems; (11) Nursery Carols. In these works several hymns which appeared in the earlier books are repeated in the later, and thus at first sight his compositions seem to be more in number than they really are. The total amounts to nearly 300, and of these about one-fourth are in common use. The most popular of these are, "God is love; that anthem olden"; "God of that glorious gift of grace"; "Holy offerings, rich and rare"; “Lord of the living harvest"; "Mighty Father, Blessed Son"; and "Sing to the Lord a joyful song." In addition to those which are annotated under their respective first lines, the following are in common use:— i. Appeared in his Hymns and Miscellaneous Poems, Dublin, 1837. 1. Birds have their quiet nests. Humility of Christ. 2. Dark and dim the day-light rose. Good Friday. 3. Friend of the friendless and the lone. Jesus, the Friend. 4. My God, what wondrous love was Thine. Whitsuntide. 5. O for a heart more fervent. Holiness desired. 6. O for the time when on the world. Missions. 7. The springtide hour brings leaf and flower. Spring. 8. This day the Lord is risen. Easter. 9. When cold our hearts and far from Thee. Teach us to Pray. 10. Why restless, why so weary? Providence. 11. Yes, I do feel, my God, that I am Thine. Assurance. ii. Appeared in his Parish Musings, 1850. 12. In Thee, my [O] God, will we rejoice. Trust in God. 13. Lord, dependent on Thy promise. Holy Baptism. 14. Members of Christ, Children of God. Confirmation. 15. So teach me, Lord, to number. The Old and New Year. 16. Soon [soon] and for ever. Death anticipated. 17. The broken, contrite heart oppress'd. Promises of God. 18. Thou art near, yes, Lord, I feel it. Divine Support. 19. Would'st thou learn the depths of sin? Passiontide. iii. Appeared in his Spiritual Songs, 1857. 20. A few bright leaders of her host. All Saints. 21. A happy, happy [merry, merry] Christmas. New Year's Day. 22. Blessed hope, that we the fallen [sinful]. Hope. 23. Heart in heart, and hand in hand. SS. Simon and Jude. 24. Jesus, my loving Lord! I know. Resignation. 25. Last Sunday of the work-day year. Sunday after Christmas Day. 26. Loved by God the Father. Holy Baptism. 27. Mercy, mercy, God the Father. Lent. 28. My head is low, my heart is sad. Confirmation. (Penitential.) 29. Oft doth the Christian's heart inquire. Christian Duty. 30. 0 God, most mighty, listen now. Charities. From "When languid frame or throbbing pulse." 31. 0 holy Sabbath day. Sunday. 32. 0 Lord, what records of Thy love. St. Barnabas. Sometimes, “Lord God, what records of Thy love." 33. 0 love, divine and golden. Holy Matrimony. From this, "Love divine and tender" is taken. 34. One lesson more the Church must learn. Waiting on God. From this, “One lesson Christ His own would teach" is taken. 35. Proudly in his [the] hall of judgment. Tuesday before Easter. 36. Sinful, sighing to be blest. Lent. 37. The Church of God, with equal care. St. James. 38. The journey done; The rest begun. Burial. 39. The simple trust that can confide. Trust. 40. Weary and sad, a wanderer from Thee. Lent. iv. Appeared, in his Hymns of Love and Praise, 1863, and 2nd ed., 1866. 41. Bounteous blesser of the seedtime. Sexagesima. Seed Time. 42. Brightly hopeful for the future. God's mercy through life. 43. Christ is risen! Alleluia! Easter. 44. Come and deck the grave with flowers. Easter Eve. 45. Fight the good fight with all thy might. Fight of Faith. 46. Holy Spirit, long expected. Whitsuntide. 47. Hours and days and months and years. The Circumcision. 48. I have no comfort but Thy love. The Comfort of Love. 49. I knew Thee in the land of drought. A Song of Love. 60. I think of Thee, my God by night. Evening. 61. Jesu, gentle Sufferer, say. Good Friday. 52. Labouring and heavy-laden. Lent. 53. Light of the world, we hail Thee. Missions. 54. Lord, to whom except to Thee? Holy Communion. 55. My sins, my sins, my Saviour. Ash Wednesday. 56. O'er the distant mountains breaking. Second Advent. 57. Other Name than our dear Lord's. Jesus All and in All. 58. Pity on us, heavenly Father. Litany Hymn for Lent. 59. Praise the Lord, rejoice, ye Gentiles. Advent, or Missions. 60. Rest of the weary, joy of the sad. Jesus, the Saviour and Friend. 61. Shadow of a mighty Rock. Jesus, the Rock of Ages. 62. Sing, 0 heaven; 0 earth rejoice. Ascension. 63. Sweet is the gentle voice of spring. Seed Time. 64. Sweet is Thy mercy, Lord. Divine Mercy. 65. Teach me to do the thing that pleaseth Thee. Divine Teaching. 66. The good old times, how glorious. Advent. 67. The world may in its wealth delight. Rejoicing in the Lord. An altered form of "Let others in their wealth delight." 68. Though Thou slay me, I will trust. Faith. 69. To Christ the Lord! The Incarnate Word. Christmas. 70. When I had wandered from His fold. The Love of God. v. Appeared in his Litany Hymns, 1869. 71. Lay the precious body, In the quiet grave. Burial. 72. My sins have taken such a hold on me. Litany of Repentance. vi. Appeared in his Parish Hymnal, 1873. 73. I hunger and I thirst. Septuagesima. Dr. Monsell’s hymns are as a whole bright, joyous, and musical; but they lack massiveness, concentration of thought, and strong emotion. A few only are of enduring excellence. --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology 1907 ===================== Monsell, J, S. B., p. 762, ii. Additional hymns in common use include:— 1. Blessed Lord, Who, till the morning. Holy Scriptures. From his Spiritual Songs, 1857. 2. Christ incarnate in His poor. Christ in His Poor. From his Hymns of Love and Praise, 1863. 3. We ask for life, and mean thereby. Life and Work. From his Hymns of Love and Praise, 1863. --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology, Appendix, Part II (1907) ==================== Monsell, J. S. B. Since the article on pp. 762-3 was written, copies of the original editions of Dr. Monsell's works have come into our hands, and from them we have to make the following corrections, the numbers following being those given to the first lines of the hymns on pp. 762-3:— 15. So teach me, &c. Hymns and Misc. Poems, 1837, p. 30. 17. The broken, &c. Hymns and Misc. Poems, 1837, p. 49. 18. Thou art near, &c. Hymns and Misc. Poems, 1837, p. 21. 19. Would'st thou, &c. Hymns and Misc. Poems, 1837, p. 14. 26. Loved by God, &c. Parish Hymnal, 1873, No. 181. 27. Mercy, mercy, &c. Prayers and Litanies, 1861, p. 119. 28. My head is low, &c. Hymns of Love and Praise, 1866, p. 125. 33. O Love divine, &c. Hymns of Love and Praise, p. 131. 38. The journey done, &c. Hymns of Love and Praise, p. 134. 40. Weary and sad, &c. Parish Hymnal, 1873, No. 209. 41-50. Hymns of Love and Praise, 1863. 51. See "Day of loss," &c, p. 282, i. 52. Labouring, &c. Prayers and Litanies, 1861, p. 116. 53-57. Hymns of Love and Praise, 1863. 58. Pity on us, &c. Prayers and Litanies, 1861, p. 125. 59. Praise the Lord, &c. Hymns of Love and Praise, 1863, p. 13. 60. 61, 62, 64, 65. Prayers and Litanies, 1861. 63, 66-70. Hymns of Love and Praise, 1863. 72. My sins, &c. Hymns of Love and Praise, 1866, p. 34. 73. I hunger, &c. Hymns of Love and Praise, 1866, p. 128. It will be seen from this list of additions and corrections that Dr. Monsell multiplied his works by giving much the same material under new titles, and that his Prayers and Litanies of 1861 were unknown to us when the original article was written. "We can sincerely add that few hymn writers are so perplexing to the annotator as Dr. Monsell. [Rev. James Mearns, M.A.] --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology, New Supplement (1907)

Samuel Sebastian Wesley

1810 - 1876 Hymnal Number: 321 Composer of "AURELIA" in Glory to God Son of composer Samuel Wesley, and grandson of Methodist hymnwriter Charles Wesley.

John Bacchus Dykes

1823 - 1876 Hymnal Number: 1 Composer of "NICAEA" in Glory to God John Bacchus Dykes, Mus. Doc.; b. Kingston-upon-Hull, 1823; d. St. Leonard's 1876 Evangelical Lutheran Hymnal, 1908

William M. Runyan

1870 - 1957 Person Name: William Marion Runyan Hymnal Number: 39 Composer of "FAITHFULNESS" in Glory to God William M. Runyan (1870-1957) was an Christian composer from the United States who wrote the music to the well-known hymn "Great Is Thy Faithfulness." William Marion Runyan was born in Marion, New York in 1870 to a Methodist minister Rev. William White and his wife Hannah (Orcutt) Runyan. As a youth, Runyan served as a church organist and graduated from Marion High School in Marion, Kansas. Runyan attended Northwestern University for three years from 1895 to 1898 and was ordained as a Methodist minister at age twenty-one and then pastored various congregations in Kansas. Starting in 1915 Runyan began writing gospel songs with the encouragement of D.B. Towner of the Moody Bible Institute. In 1923 Runyan moved from Wichita to Chicago. From 1924 to 1926 Runyan was affiliated with John Brown University in Siloam Springs, Arkansas pastoring the Federated Church, and editing the Christian Workers' Magazine. Runyan then moved back to Chicago where he worked with the Moody Bible Institute, and he worked as editor for Hope Publishing Company, co-editing "The Service Hymnal" with Gordon Shorney. In 1923 Runyan composed the music to the song "Great is Thy Faithfulness," originally a poem by Thomas O. Chisholm, a friend and fellow Methodist minister. Runyan retired from Hope in 1948 and received the honorary Doctor of Letters from Wheaton College. Runyan lived for a period of his retirement in Galveston, Texas and died on July 29, 1957 in Pittsburg, Kansas. He is buried in Baldwin City, Kansas. Runyan was a professor and preacher at Baker University in Baldwin City for a period and his children attended the University. Runyan's survivors endowed the "The Rev. William M. Runyan Endowed Memorial Scholarship" at Baker University with the royalties from his song "Great is Thy Faithfulness." http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/

Joseph Haydn

1732 - 1809 Person Name: Franz Joseph Haydn Hymnal Number: 81 Composer of "AUSTRIAN HYMN" in Glory to God Francis Joseph Haydn; b. 1732, Rohrau, Austria; d. 1809, Vienna Evangelical Lutheran Hymnal, 1908

Rowland Hugh Prichard

1811 - 1887 Hymnal Number: 82 Composer of "HYFRYDOL" in Glory to God Also: Pritchard, R. H. (Rowland Hugh), 1811-1887

William J. Kirkpatrick

1838 - 1921 Person Name: William James Kirkpatrick Hymnal Number: 114 Composer of "CRADLE SONG" in Glory to God

P. P. Bliss

1838 - 1876 Person Name: Philip P. Bliss Hymnal Number: 840 Composer of "VILLE DU HAVRE" in Glory to God Bliss, Philip, b. at Clearfield County, Pennsylvania, July 9, 1838. In 1864 he went to Chicago in the employ of Dr. George F. Root, the musician, where he was engaged in conducting musical Institutes, and in composing Sunday School melodies. Originally a Methodist, he became, about 1871, a choirman of the First Congregational Church, Chicago, and the Superintendent of its Sunday Schools. In 1874 he joined D. W. Whittle in evangelical work. To this cause he gave (although a poor man) the royalty of his Gospel Songs, which was worth some thirty thousand dollars. His death was sudden. It occurred in the railway disaster at Ashtabula, Ohio, Dec. 30, 1876. ... Some of his verses have obtained wide popularity in most English-speaking countries. The more widely known, and specially those which are found in collections in use in G. Britain, are in the following American works:— i. The Prize, 1870. 1. I should like to die. Death anticipated. This is one of his earliest compositions, and is unworthy of the position it holds. 2. Through the valley of the shadow I must go. Death anticipated. 3. Whosoever heareth, shout, shout the sound. Jesus the Way. Written during the winter of 1869-70 after hearing Mr. H. Moorhouse (from England) preach on St. John iii. 16. ii. The Charm, 1871. 4. Almost persuaded now to believe. Procrastination. This was suggested by the following passage in a sermon by the Rev. Mr. Brundnge, Bliss being present at its delivery:—" He who is almost persuaded is almost saved, but to be almost saved is to be entirely lost." 5. Ho! my comrades! see the signal. Faithfulness. 6. O! Jerusalem, the golden city, bright, &c. Heaven. 7. On what Foundation do [did] you build? Christ the Foundation. iii. The Song Tree, 1872. 8. Light in the darkness, sailor, day is at hand. Safety. This hymn, “The Life-Boat," has attained to great popularity. The incident upon which it is based, that of the rescue of a ship's crew by a life-boat, is given in detail by Mr. Sankey in his Sacred Songs, &c, No. 99 (large ed.). It is sometimes known by its refrain, "Pull for the shore," &c. iv. The Joy, 1873. 9. In me ye may have peace. Peace. 10. To die is gain. Death anticipated. v. Sunshine, 1873. 11. Down life's dark vale we wander. Death anticipated. 12. More holiness give me. For Holiness. 13. Only an armour-bearer. Soldiers of the Cross. 14. Standing by a purpose true. Faithfulness. 15. This loving Saviour stands patiently. Invitation. vi. Gospel Songs, 1874. 16. A long time I wandered. Peace and Joy. 17. Brightly beams our Father's mercy. Mercy. 18. Come, brethren, as we march along. Praise. 19. Free from the law, O happy condition. Redemption. 20. Have you on the Lord believed? Fullness of Grace. This hymn arose out of the following circumstances :—" A vast fortune was left in the hands of a minister for one of his poor parishioners. Fearing that it might be sqmandered if suddenly bestowed upon him, the wise minister sent him a little at a time, with a note saying, “This is thine; use it wisely; there is more to follow.” Hence also the refrain ‘More to follow,’ by which the hymn is known." 21. How much owest thou? Divine Claims. 22. I know not the hour when my Lord will come. Death anticipated. Suggested by reading the book, The Gates Ajar. 23. See the gentle Shepherd standing. The Good Shepherd. 24. Though the way be sometimes dreary. Divine Leading. 25. Will you meet me at the fountain? Fountain of Living Water. The incident out of which this hymn arose is thus stated in The Christian, No. 365, "At the Industrial Exposition at Chicago it was an everyday appointment to meet at the Central Fountain. Mr. P. P. Bliss, whose mind seemed always set on things above, caught up the words, and wrote this hymn, 'Meet me at the Fountain.'" vii. Gospel Hymns, No. 1, 1875. 26. One offer of salvation. The Name of Jesus. 27. Wandering afar from the dwellings of men. The Lepers. viii. The International Lesson Monthly, 1875. 28. Weary gleaner, whence comest thou? Duty. 29. The whole world was lost in the darkness of Sin. Light of the world. 30. Man of sorrows! what a name. Redemption. 31. The Spirit, O sinner, in mercy doth move. Holy Spirit. ix. Gospel Hymns, No. 2, 1876. 32. At the feet of Jesus. The good choice. 33. Come, sing the Gospel's joyful sound. Salvation. 34. Cut it down, cut it down. Justice and Mercy. 35. Do you see the Hebrew captive? Prayer. 36. Hallelujah, He is risen. Easier. Written in the spring of 1876 and first sung by Bliss on Easter afternoon, 1876, in the Court House Square, Augusta, Georgia, to 5900 people. 37. In Zion's rock abiding. Safety. 38. Repeat the story o'er and o'er. Grace and Peace. 39. Tenderly the Shepherd. The Good Shepherd. x. Gospel Hymns, No. 3, 1878. 40. Hear ye the glad good news from heaven. Faith and Salvation. 41. I will sing of my Redeemer. Praise. xi. Gospel Hymns, No. 4, 1881. 42. 'Tis known on earth and heaven too. More about Jesus. xii. Various. 43. Sing over again to me. Words of Life. This appeared in a paper entitled Words of Life, 1874, The following are undated:— 44. March to the battle-field. Duty and Victory. 45. There is sin in the camp. Hinderances. 46. 'Tis the promise of God. Praise. 47. While the silvery moon-beams, fall, New Birth. 48. God is always near me. Omnipresence. Two hymns," I am so glad that our Father in heaven," and " Sowing the seed by the daylight [dawnlight] fair," (sometimes given as " Sowing our seed in the morning fair ") are usually attributed to Mr. Bliss. In his Gospel Songs, Cincinnati, 1874, however, he lays claim to the music only. Mr. Sankey attributes this last to "E. A. Oakey." With the exception of No. 48, these hymns are given in Mr. Sankey's Sacred Songs & Solos, Pts. i. and ii. Their popularity is far beyond their literary merits, and is mainly due to the simple melodies to which they are wedded. As a writer of hymns of this class Mr. Bliss is second only to Mrs. Van Alstyne. Many anecdotes concerning hymns of this class are given in American Evangelists; an Account of their work in England and America, by the Rev. Elias Nason, Boston, U.S., Lathrop & Co., 1877. Mr. Bliss is usually known as "P. P. Bliss." This is found on the title-pages of his collections. On his own authority, however, we are enabled to say that his name originally stood thus : “Philipp Bliss.” Early in life he separated the final p from his Christian name, constituted it a capital P, and thus produced "P. P. Bliss." (For this article we are mainly indebted to Professor F. M. Bird, and Mr. H. P. Main.) -John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907) ======================== Bliss, Philip , p. 151, i. "Sowing the seed by the daylight fair" is in the Family Treasury , Edinburgh, 1861, pt. i., p. 84. It is said to be by Miss Emily Sullivan Oakey; born at Albany, N. York, Oct. 8, 1829, died May 11, 1883. Note also that Bliss's hymn, No. 43. on p. 150, ii., should read, "Sing them over again to me." --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology, Appendix, Part II (1907) ===================== Bliss, P., p. 150, i. Two works have been brought to our notice, since the issue of our first edition of this Dictionary, which concern this author, viz.:— 1. Memoirs of Philip P. Bliss. Edited by D. W. Whittle. Contributions by Rev. E. P. Goodwin, Ira D. Sankey, and Geo. F. Root. Introduction by D. L. Moody. New York, &c.: A. S. Barnes & Co., 1877. 2. My Life and Sacred Songs. By Ira D. Sankey. With an Introduction by Theodore L. Cuyler, D.D). London: Hodder & Stoughton, and Morgan & Scott, 1906. These works have a special interest for those who use I. D. Sankey's Sacred Songs & Solos, and all of P. Bliss's publications. To Mr. Sankey's My Life, &c, we direct special attention for P. Bliss's hymns:— “Do you see the Hebrew captive kneeling?" p. 294. "Down life's dark vale we wander." p. 285. "Ho! my comrades, see the signal." p. 105. "'Tis the promise of God full salvation to give." p. 99. --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology, New Supplement (1907)

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