Person Results

Meter:irregular
In:people

Planning worship? Check out our sister site, ZeteoSearch.org, for 20+ additional resources related to your search.
Showing 1 - 10 of 2,639Results Per Page: 102050

William T. Sleeper

1819 - 1904 Person Name: W. T. Sleeper Meter: Irregular Author of "Out of My Bondage, Sorrow, and Night" in Trinity Hymnal (Rev. ed.) Sleeper, W. T. is given in I. D. Sankey’s Sacred Songs & Solos, 1881, as the author of “A ruler once came to Jesus by night” (Need for the New Birth). --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology, Appendix, Part II (1907) =============== William T. Sleeper (1819-1904)] Born: Feb­ru­a­ry 9, 1819, Dan­bu­ry, New Hamp­shire. Died: Sep­tem­ber 24, 1904, Well­es­ley, Mass­a­chu­setts. Sleeper at­tend­ed Phill­ips-Ex­e­ter Acad­e­my, the Un­i­ver­si­ty of Ver­mont, and the An­do­ver The­o­lo­gic­al Sem­in­a­ry. Af­ter or­din­a­tion, he con­duct­ed home min­is­try work in Mass­a­chu­setts and Maine. He lat­er be­came pas­tor of the Sum­mer Street Con­gre­ga­tion­al Church in Wor­ces­ter, Mass­a­chu­setts, where he served over 30 years. His works include: The Re­ject­ed King, and Hymns of Je­sus, 1883. -- www.hymntime.com

Frederick William Faber

1814 - 1863 Person Name: Rev. F. W. Faber Meter: Irregular Author of "Where loyal hearts and true" in The Book of Common Praise Raised in the Church of England, Frederick W. Faber (b. Calverly, Yorkshire, England, 1814; d. Kensington, London, England, 1863) came from a Huguenot and strict Calvinistic family background. He was educated at Balliol College, Oxford, and ordained in the Church of England in 1839. Influenced by the teaching of John Henry Newman, Faber followed Newman into the Roman Catholic Church in 1845 and served under Newman's supervision in the Oratory of St. Philip Neri. Because he believed that Roman Catholics should sing hymns like those written by John Newton, Charles Wesley, and William Cowpe, Faber wrote 150 hymns himself. One of his best known, "Faith of Our Fathers," originally had these words in its third stanza: "Faith of Our Fathers! Mary's prayers/Shall win our country back to thee." He published his hymns in various volumes and finally collected all of them in Hymns (1862). Bert Polman ================= Faber, Frederick William, D.D., son of Mr. T. H. Faber, was born at Calverley Vicarage, Yorkshire, June 28, 1814, and educated at Balliol College, Oxford, graduating B.A. in 1836. He was for some time a Fellow of University College, in the same University. Taking Holy Orders in 1837, he became Rector of Elton, Huntingdonshire, in 1843, but in 1846 he seceded to the Church of Rome. After residing for some time at St. Wilfrid's, Staffordshire, he went to London in 1849, and established the London "Oratorians," or, "Priests of the Congregation of St. Philip Neri," in King William Street, Strand. In 1854 the Oratory was removed to Brompton. Dr. Faber died Sept. 26, 1863. Before his secession he published several prose works, some of which were in defence of the Church of England; and afterwards several followed as Spiritual Conferences, All for Jesus, &c. Although he published his Cherwell Waterlily and Other Poems, 1840; The Styrian Lake, and Other Poems, 1842; Sir Lancelot, 1844; and The Rosary and Other Poems, 1845; and his Lives of the Saints, in verse, before he joined the Church of Rome, all his hymns were published after he joined that communion. They were included in his:— (1) A small book of eleven Hymns1849, for the School at St. Wilfrid's, Staffordshire. (2) Jesus and Mary: or, Catholic Hymns for Singing and Reading, London 1849. In 1852 the 2nd edition was published with an addition of 20 new hymns. (3) Oratory Hymns, 1854; and (4) Hymns, 1862, being a collected edition of what he had written and published from time to time. Dr. Faber's account of the origin of his hymn-writing is given in his Preface to Jesus & Mary. After dwelling on the influence, respectively, of St. Theresa, of St. Ignatius, and of St. Philip Neri, on Catholicism; and of the last that "sanctity in the world, perfection at home, high attainments in common earthly callings…was the principal end of his apostolate," he says:— “It was natural then that an English son of St. Philip should feel the want of a collection of English Catholic hymns fitted for singing. The few in the Garden of the Soul were all that were at hand, and of course they were not numerous enough to furnish the requisite variety. As to translations they do not express Saxon thought and feelings, and consequently the poor do not seem to take to them. The domestic wants of the Oratory, too, keep alive the feeling that something of the sort was needed: though at the same time the author's ignorance of music appeared in some measure to disqualify him for the work of supplying the defect. Eleven, however, of the hymns were written, most of them, for particular tunes and on particular occasions, and became very popular with a country congregation. They were afterwards printed for the Schools at St. Wilfrid's, and the very numerous applications to the printer for them seemed to show that, in spite of very glaring literary defects, such as careless grammar and slipshod metre, people were anxious to have Catholic hymns of any sort. The manuscript of the present volume was submitted to a musical friend, who replied that certain verses of all or nearly all of the hymns would do for singing; and this encouragement has led to the publication of the volume." In the same Preface he clearly points to the Olney Hymns and those of the Wesleys as being the models which for simplicity and intense fervour he would endeavour to emulate. From the small book of eleven hymns printed for the schools at St. Wilfrid's, his hymn-writing resulted in a total of 150 pieces, all of which are in his Hymns, 1862, and many of them in various Roman Catholic collections for missions and schools. Few hymns are more popular than his "My God, how wonderful Thou art," "O come and mourn with me awhile," and "Sweet Saviour, bless us ere we go." They excel in directness, simplicity, and pathos. "Hark, hark, my soul, angelic songs are swelling," and "O Paradise, O Paradise," are also widely known. These possess, however, an element of unreality which is against their permanent popularity. Many of Faber's hymns are annotated under their respective first lines; the rest in common use include:— i. From his Jesus and Mary, 1849 and 1852. 1. Fountain of love, Thyself true God. The Holy Ghost. 2. How shalt thou bear the Cross, that now. The Eternal Years. 3. I come to Thee, once more, O God. Returning to God. 4. Joy, joy, the Mother comes. The Purification. 5. My soul, what hast thou done for God? Self-Examination 6. O how the thought of God attract. Holiness Desired. 7. O soul of Jesus, sick to death. Passiontide. Sometimes this is divided into two parts, Pt. ii. beginning, “My God, my God, and can it be." ii. From his Oratory Hymns, 1854. 8. Christians, to the war! Gather from afar. The Christian Warfare. 9. O come to the merciful Saviour that calls you. Divine Invitation. In many collections. 10. O God, Thy power is wonderful. Power and Eternity of God. 11. O it is sweet to think, Of those that are departed. Memory of the Dead. 12. O what are the wages of sin? The Wages of Sin. 13. O what is this splendour that beams on me now? Heaven. 14. Saint of the Sacred Heart. St. John the Evangelist. iii. From his Hymns, 1862. 15. Father, the sweetest, dearest Name. The Eternal Father. 16. Full of glory, full of wonders, Majesty Divine. Holy Trinity. 17. Hark ! the sound of the fight. Processions. 18. How pleasant are thy paths, 0 death. Death Contemplated. 19. O God, Whose thoughts are brightest light. Thinking no Evil. 20. O why art thou sorrowful, servant of God? Trust in God. 21. Souls of men, why will ye scatter? The Divine Call. 22. The land beyond the sea. Heaven Contemplated. 23. The thought of God, the thought of thee. Thoughts of God. 24. We come to Thee, sweet Saviour. Jesus, our Rest. In addition to these there are also several hymns in common use in Roman Catholic hymn-books which are confined to those collections. In the Hymns for the Year, by Dr. Rawes, Nos. 77, 110, 112, 117, 120, 121, 122, 125, 127, 128, 131, 140, 152, 154,169, 170, 174, 179, 180, 192, 222, 226, 230, 271, 272, are also by Faber, and relate principally to the Blessed Virgin Mary. Several of these are repeated in other Roman Catholic collections. --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907 ================== Faber, Frederick William, p. 361, i. To this article the following additions have to be made:— 1. Blood is the price of heaven. Good Friday. (1862.) 2. Exceeding sorrowful to death. Gethsemane. This in the Scottish Ibrox Hymnal, 1871, is a cento from "O soul of Jesus, sick to death," p. 362, i., 7. 3. From pain to pain, from woe to woe. Good Friday. (1854.) 4. I wish to have no wishes left. Wishes about death. (1862.) 5. Why is thy face so lit with smiles? Ascension. (1849.) The dates here given are those of Faber's works in which the hymns appeared. In addition to these hymns there are also the following in common use:— 6. Dear God of orphans, hear our prayer. On behalf of Orphans. This appeared in a miscellaneous collection entitled A May Garland, John Philip, n.d. [1863], No. 1, in 7 stanzas of 4 lines. In the Roman Catholic Parochial Hymn Book, 1880, it begins, "O God of orphans, hear our prayer." 7. Sleep, sleep my beautiful babe. Christmas Carol. This carol we have failed to trace. 8. By the Archangel's word of love. Pt. i. Life of our Lord. This, and Pt. ii., “By the blood that flowed from Thee"; Pt. iii., "By the first bright Easter day"; also, "By the word to Mary given"; "By the name which Thou didst take"; in The Crown Hymn Book and other Roman Catholic collections, we have seen ascribed to Dr. Faber, but in the Rev. H. Formby's Catholic Hymns, 1853, they are all signed "C. M. C," i.e. Cecilia M. Caddell (p. 200, i.). --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology, Appendix, Part II (1907) ====================== Faber, F. W., pp. 361, i.; 1562, ii. We are informed by members of Dr. Faber's family that his father was Mr. Thomas Henry Faber, sometime Lay Secretary of the Bishop of Durham. In addition to his hymns already noted in this Dictionary, the following are found in various Roman Catholic collections, viz.:— i. From St. Wilfrid's Hymns, 1849:— 1. Dear Father Philip, holy Sire. S. Philip Neri. 2. Hail, holy Joseph, hail. S. Joseph. 3. Mother of Mercy, day by day. Blessed Virgin Mary. ii. Jesus and Mary, 1849:— 4. Ah ! dearest Lord! I cannot pray. Prayer. 5. Dear Husband of Mary. S. Joseph. 6. Dear Little One, how sweet Thou art. Christmas. 7. Father and God! my endless doom. Predestination. 8. Hail, holy Wilfrid, hail. S. Wilfrid. 9. O Jesus, if in days gone by. Love of the World. 10. O turn to Jesus, Mother, turn. B. V. M. 11. Sing, sing, ye angel bands. Assum. B. V. M. iii. Jesus and Mary, 1852:— 12. All ye who love the ways of sin. S. Philip Neri. 13. Day set on Rome! its golden morn. S. Philip Neri. 14. Hail, bright Archangel! Prince of heaven. S. Michael. 15. Hail, Gabriel, hail. S. Gabriel. 16. O Flower of Grace, divinest Flower. B. V. M. 17. Saint Philip! 1 have never known. S. Philip Neri. 18. Sweet Saint Philip, thou hast won us. S. Philip Neri. Previously in the Rambler, May, 1850, p. 425. iv. Oratory Hymns, 1854:— 19. Day breaks on temple roofs and towers. Expect. of B. V. M. 20. How gently flow the silent years. S. Martin and S. Philip. 21. How the light of Heaven is stealing. Grace. 22. Like the dawning of the morning. Expect. of B. V. M. 23. Mother Mary ! at thine altar. For Orphans. 24. My God! Who art nothing but mercy and kindness. Repentance. 25. O blessed Father! sent by God. S. Vincent of Paul. 26. O do you hear that voice from heaven? Forgiveness. 27. The chains that have bound me. Absolution. 28. The day, the happy day, is dawning. B. V. M. 29. The moon is in the heavens above. B. V. M. 30. Why art thou sorrowful, servant of God? Mercy. v. Hymns, 1862:— 31. At last Thou art come, little Saviour. Christmas. 32. By the spring of God's compassions. S. Raphael. 33. Fair are the portals of the day. B. V. M. 34. Father of many children. S. Benedict. 35. From the highest heights of glory. S. Mary Magdalene. 36. Like the voiceless starlight falling. B. V. M. 37. Mary! dearest mother. B. V. M. 38. Mother of God, we hail thy heart. B. V. M. 39. O Anne! thou hadst lived through those long dreary years. S. Anne. Previously in Holy Family Hymns, 1860. 40. O balmy and bright as moonlit night. B. V. M. 41. O Blessed Trinity! Thy children. Holy Trinity. 42. O dear Saint Martha, busy saint. S. Martha 43. O Mother, will it always be. B. V. M. 44. O vision bright. B. V. M. 45. Summer suns for ever shining. B. V. M. 46. There are many saints above. S. Joseph. Previously in Holy Family Hymns, 1860. vi. Centos and altered forms:— 47. Confraternity men to the fight. From "Hark the sound of the fight," p. 362, i. 48. Hail, sainted Mungo, hail. From No. 8. 49. I bow to Thee, sweet will of God. From "I worship Thee," p. 559, ii. 50. They whom we loved on earth. From "0 it is sweet to think," p. 362, i. 51. Vincent! like Mother Mary, thou. From No. 25. When Dr. Faber's hymns which are in common use are enumerated, the total falls little short of one hundred. In this respect he outnumbers most of his contemporaries. [Rev. James Mearns] --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology, New Supplement (1907) -------------- See also in: Hymn Writers of the Church

Edward Henry Bickersteth

1825 - 1906 Person Name: Edward H. Bickersteth Meter: Irregular Author of "Peace, Perfect Peace" in Hymns for the Living Church Bickersteth, Edward Henry, D.D., son of Edward Bickersteth, Sr. born at Islington, Jan. 1825, and educated at Trinity College, Cambridge (B.A. with honours, 1847; M.A., 1850). On taking Holy Orders in 1848, he became curate of Banningham, Norfolk, and then of Christ Church, Tunbridge Wells. His preferment to the Rectory of Hinton-Martell, in 1852, was followed by that of the Vicarage of Christ Church, Hampstead, 1855. In 1885 he became Dean of Gloucester, and the same year Bishop of Exeter. Bishop Bickersteth's works, chiefly poetical, are:— (l) Poems, 1849; (2) Water from the Well-spring, 1852; (3) The Rock of Ages, 1858 ; (4) Commentary on the New Testament, 1864; (5) Yesterday, To-day, and For Ever, 1867; (6) The Spirit of Life, 1868; (7) The Two Brothers and other Poems, 1871; (8) The Master's Home Call, 1872 ; (9) The Shadowed Home and the Light Beyond, 1874; (10) The Beef and other Parables, 1873; (11) Songs in the House of Pilgrimage, N.D.; (12) From Year to Year, 1883. As an editor of hymnals, Bp. Bickersteth has also been most successful. His collections are:— (1) Psalms & Hymns, 1858, based on his father's Christian Psalmody, which passed through several editions; (2) The Hymnal Companion, 1870; (3) The Hymnal Companion revised and enlarged, 1876. Nos. 2 and 3, which are two editions of the same collection, have attained to an extensive circulation.   [Ch. of England Hymnody.] About 30 of Bp. Bickersteths hymns are in common use. Of these the best and most widely known are:—" Almighty Father, hear our cry"; "Come ye yourselves apart and rest awhile"; "Father of heaven above"; "My God, my Father, dost Thou call"; "O Jesu, Saviour of the lost"; "Peace, perfect peace"; "Rest in the Lord"; "Stand, Soldier of the Cross"; " Thine, Thine, for ever"; and "Till He come.” As a poet Bp. Bickersteth is well known. His reputation as a hymn-writer has also extended far and wide. Joined with a strong grasp of his subject, true poetic feeling, a pure rhythm, there is a soothing plaintiveness and individuality in his hymns which give them a distinct character of their own. His thoughts are usually with the individual, and not with the mass: with the single soul and his God, and not with a vast multitude bowed in adoration before the Almighty. Hence, although many of his hymns are eminently suited to congregational purposes, and have attained to a wide popularity, yet his finest productions are those which are best suited for private use. -John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907) ================= Bickersteth, Edward Henry, p. 141, ii. Bishop Bickersteth's 1890 edition of his Hymnal Companion is noted on p. 1312, i., and several of his own hymns and translations, which appear therein for the first time, are annotated in this Appendix. One of these, "All-merciful, Almighty Lord," for the Conv. of St. Paul, was written for the 1890 edition of Hymnal Companion. --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology, Appendix, Part II (1907) ================== Bickersteth, B. H., p. 141, ii. Bp. Bickersteth died in London, May 16, 1906. --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology, New Supplement (1907)

Ruth C. Duck

b. 1947 Person Name: Ruth Duck Meter: Irregular Adapter of "We Gather Together" in Chalice Hymnal

Mary Dana Shindler

1810 - 1883 Person Name: Mrs. M. S. B. Dana Meter: Irregular Author of "I'm a Pilgrim" in Gloria Deo Shindler, Mary Stanley Bunce, née Palmer, better known as Mrs. Dana, was born in Beaufort, South Carolina, Feb. 15, 1810. In 1835 she was married to Charles E. Dana, of New York, and removed with him to Bloomington, now Muscatine, Iowa, in 1838. Mr. Dana died in 1839, and Mrs. Dana returned to South Carolina. Subsequently she was married to the Rev. Robert D. Shindler, who was Professor in Shelby College, Kentucky, in 1851, and afterwards in Texas. Mrs. Shindler, originally a Presbyterian, was for some time an Unitarian; but of late years she has been a member of the Protestant Episcopal Church. As Mary S. B. Dana she published the Southern Harp, 1840, and the Northern Harp, 1841. From these works her hymns have been taken, 8 of which are in T. O. Summers's Songs of Zion, 1851. The best known are:— 1. Fiercely came the tempest sweeping. Christ stilling the storm. (1841.) 2. I'm a pilgrim, and I'm a stranger. A Christian Pilgrim. (1841.) 3. O sing to me of heaven. Heaven contemplated. (1840.) Sometimes given as "Come, sing to me of heaven." [Rev. F. M. Bird, M.A.] -- John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907) =================== Shindler, Mary S. B., p. 1055, i. Other hymns usually attributed to this writer, are "Prince of Peace, control my will" (Perfect Peace), in the Church of England Magazine, March 3, 1858, in 32 lines; and " Once upon the heaving ocean" (Jesus calming the Sea). --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology, Appendix, Part II (1907)

W. A. Ogden

1841 - 1897 Person Name: William A. Odgen, 1841-1897 Meter: Irregular Author of "Look and Live" in Rejoice Hymns William Augustine Ogden USA 1841-1897. Born at Franklin County, OH, his family moved to IN when he was age six. He studied music in local singing schools at age 8, and by age 10 could read church music fairly well. Later, he could write out a melody by hearing it sung or played. He enlisted in the American Civil War in the 30th IN Volunteer Infantry. During the war he organized a male choir which became well known throughout the Army of the Cumberland. After the war, he returned home, resumed music study, and taught school. He married Jennie V Headington, and they had two children: Lowell and Marian. He worked for the Iowa Normal School, Toledo Public School System. Among his teachers: Lowell Mason, Thomas Hastings, E E Baily and B F Baker, president of the Boston Music School. He wrote many hymns, both lyrics and/or music. He later issued his first song book, “The silver song” (1870). It became quite popular, selling 500,000 copies. He went on to publish other song books. Ogden also taught music at many schools in the U S and Canada. In 1887 he became superintendent of music in the public schools of Toledo, OH. His works include: “New silver songs for Sunday school” (1872), “Crown of life” (1875), “Notes of victory” (1885), “The way of life” (1886), “Gathering jewels” (1886). He was known as a very enthusiastic person in his work and a very congenial one as well. He died at Toledo, OH. John Perry

H. L. Gilmour

1836 - 1920 Person Name: Henry L. Gilmore, 1837-1920 Meter: Irregular Author of "The Haven of Rest" in Rejoice Hymns Henry Lake Gilmour United Kingdom 1836-1920. Born at Londonderry, Ireland, he emigrated to America as a teenager, thinking he wanted to learn navigation. When he reached the U.S., he arrived in Philadelphia and decided to seek his fortune in America. He started working as a painter, then served in the American Civil War, where he was captured and spent several months in Libby Prison, Richmond, VA. He married Letitia Pauline Howard in 1858. After the war he trained as a dentist and did that for many years. In 1869 he moved to Wenonah, NJ, and helped found the Methodist church there in 1885. He served as Sunday school superintendent and, for four decades, directed the choir at the Pittman Grove Camp Meeting, also working as song leader at camp meetings in Mountain Lake Park, MD, and Ridgeview Park, PA. He was an editor, author, and composer. He edited and/or published 25 gospel song books, along with John Sweney, J Lincoln Hall, John J Hood, Howard Entwistle, Joshua Gill, E L Hyde, Milton S Rees and William J Kirkpatrick. He died in Delair, NJ, after a buggy accident. John Perry

Mary Ann Baker

1832 - 1925 Person Name: Mary A. Baker, 1831-1921 Meter: Irregular Author of "Master, the Tempest Is Raging" in Rejoice Hymns Baker, Mary A.. Miss Baker, who is a member of the Baptist denomination, and a resident in Chicago, Illinois, is an active worker in the temperance cause, and the author of various hymns and temperance songs.    Her most popular hymn:-— 1. Master, the tempest is raging, Peace, was written in 1874 at the request of Dr. H. R. Palmer, who desired of her several songs on the subjects of a series of Sunday School Lessons for that year. Its theme is "Christ stilling the tempest."   During the same year it was set to music by Dr. Palmer, and pub. in his Songs of Love for the Bible School, 1874. It is found in other collections, including I. D. Sankey's Sacred Songs and Solos, London, 1881. Its home popularity was increased by its republication and frequent use during the illness of Pres. Garfield. It was sung at several of the funeral services held in his honour throughout the States. 2. Why perish with cold and with hunger? Invitation. This is another of her hymns set to music by I. D. Sankey, and included in his Sacred Songs and Solos, Lond., 1881. --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907) _______ Mary Ann Baker (sometimes known as Mary Eddy Baker), daughter of Joshua Baker and Catherine Eddy, was born 16 Sept. 1832 in Orwell, Oswego, NY. As a young child, her family moved to Branch County, Michigan. Her father died there in 1839 at age 39. A few years later, in 1843, her mother married David Ripley and had two more children, but by 1850, her mother was a single parent again with five children, living in Kinderhook, Branch, Michigan. By 1855, her mother had remarried to Ephraim Potter, and they were living in Boonville, Oneida, New York. In 1860, she and her sister Rhoda Ripley were living in Kalamazoo, Michigan, where she found work as a compositor. Some time between 1867 and 1868 (her sister Rhoda married George Ely in 1868 in Kalamazoo), she moved to Chicago, where she similarly worked as a compositor for Horton & Leonard. While in Chicago, she met composer Horatio R. Palmer and was associated with the Second Baptist Church. In 1900, she was still living in Chicago. Mary never married. In her final years, she was living in the Baptist Old People's Home in nearby Maywood, Cook County, Illinois, where she died at age 93 on 29 Sept. 1925. by Chris Fenner, 14 Feb. 2022

Civilla D. Martin

1866 - 1948 Meter: Irregular Author of "His Eye Is on the Sparrow" in The Celebration Hymnal Martin, Civilla Durfee (Jordan Falls, Nova Scotia, August 21, 1866--March 9, 1948, Atlanta, Georgia). Daughter of James N. and Irene (Harding) Holden. She married Rev. John F. Geddes, Congregational minister of Coventryvilee, N.Y. at Jordan Falls Methodist Church, Shelbourne Co., Nova Scotia, on May 19, 1891. There is thus far no information about their marriage and its end. After several years of teaching school, she married Walter Stillman Martin, a Baptist minister, and traveled with him in evangelistic work. However, because of frail health, she was compelled to remain home much of the time. In 1916, they became members of the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ). They had one son, A.G. Martin. In her writing, she used only her initials, "C.D." rather than her full name of that of her composer-husband. She is reputed to have written several hundred hymns and religious songs. Her first one, "God Will Take Care of You," written in 1904 became world-famous. Her husband wrote the music for this and many of her other hymns. "His Eye is on the Sparrow" written in 1906 and set to music by Charles H. Gabriel, has also received wide acclaim. In addition to the above, "Like As A Father," "A Welcome for Me," and "The Blood Will Never Lose Its Power" are among her better-known hymns. Her husband and collaborator, W.S. Martin (1862-1935) preceded her in death. For the last 29 years of her life, she made her home in Atlanta, Georgia, where she was a member of the First Christian Church. Her funeral was held on March 10, 1948 at Spring Hill and the interment was in the West View Cemetery in Atlanta. --Carlton C. Buck, DNAH Archives and email from Rev. Lester M. Settle (Glenholme, Nova Scotia) to Mary Louise VanDyke 18 September 2008, DNAH Archives.

Thomas Olivers

1725 - 1799 Meter: Irregular Author of "The God of Abraham praise" in The Hymnal, Revised and Enlarged, as adopted by the General Convention of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the United States of America in the year of our Lord 1892 Thomas Olivers was born in Tregonan, Montgomeryshire, in 1725. His youth was one of profligacy, but under the ministry of Whitefield, he was led to a change of life. He was for a time apprenticed to a shoemaker, and followed his trade in several places. In 1763, John Wesley engaged him as an assistant; and for twenty-five years he performed the duties of an itinerant ministry. During the latter portion of his life he was dependent on a pension granted him by the Wesleyan Conference. He died in 1799. --Annotations of the Hymnal, Charles Hutchins, M.A., 1872. ================== Olivers, Thomas, was born at Tregynon, near Newtown, Montgomeryshire, in 1725. His father's death, when the son was only four years of age, followed by that of the mother shortly afterwards, caused him to be passed on to the care of one relative after another, by whom he was brought up in a somewhat careless manner, and with little education. He was apprenticed to a shoemaker. His youth was one of great ungodliness, through which at the age of 18 he was compelled to leave his native place. He journeyed to Shrewsbury, Wrexham, and Bristol, miserably poor and very wretched. At Bristol he heard G. Whitefield preach from the text "Is not this a brand plucked out of the fire?" That sermon turned the whole current of his life, and he became a decided Christian. His intention at the first was to join the followers of Whitefield, but being discouraged from doing so by one of Whitefield's preachers, he subsequently joined the Methodist Society at Bradford-on-Avon. At that town, where he purposed carrying on his business of shoemaking, he met John Wesley, who, recognising in him both ability and zeal, engaged him as one of his preachers. Olivers joined Wesley at once, and proceeded as an evangelist to Cornwall. This was on Oct. 1, 1753. He continued his work till his death, which took place suddenly in London, in March 1799. He was buried in Wesley's tomb in the City Road Chapel burying ground, London. Olivers was for some time co-editor with J. Wesley of the Arminian Magazine, but his lack of education unfitted him for the work. As the author of the tune Helmsley, and of the hymn “The God of Abraham praise," he is widely known. He also wrote “Come Immortal King of glory;" and "O Thou God of my salvation," whilst residing at Chester; and an Elegy on the death of John Wesley. His hymns and the Elegy were reprinted (with a Memoir by the Rev. J. Kirk) by D. Sedgwick, in 1868. --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907)

Pages


Export as CSV