Search Results

Scripture:hebrews 1:1-4

Texts

text icon
Text authorities
TextPage scansFlexscoreAudio

Rejoice, the Lord Is King

Author: Charles Wesley Meter: 6.6.6.6.8.8 Appears in 680 hymnals Scripture: Hebrews 1:3 Lyrics: 1 Rejoice, the Lord is King! Your Lord and King adore. Rejoice, give thanks and sing and triumph evermore. Lift up your heart, lift up your voice. Rejoice, again I say, rejoice! 2 His kingdom cannot fail; he rules o'er earth and heaven; the keys of death and hell to Christ the Lord are given. Lift up your heart, lift up your voice. Rejoice, again I say, rejoice! 3 He sits at God's right hand till all his foes submit, bow down at his command, and fall beneath his feet. Lift up your heart, lift up your voice. Rejoice, again I say, rejoice! 4 Rejoice in glorious hope; for Christ, the Judge, shall come to gather all his saints to their eternal home. We soon shall hear the archangel's voice; the trump of God shall sound, rejoice! Topics: Ascension & Reign of Christ; Kingdom; King, God/Christ as; Judge, God/Christ as; Joy; Assurance; Ascension & Reign of Christ; Return of Christ; King, God/Christ as; Judge, God/Christ as; Return of Christ Used With Tune: DARWALL'S 148TH
Flexscore

God Has Spoken by the Prophets

Author: George Wallace Briggs Appears in 45 hymnals Scripture: Hebrews 1:3 First Line: [God Has Spoken by the Prophets] Text Sources: New Songs of Rejoicing (Selah Publishing Co, 1994)
TextPage scansFlexscore

O Splendor of God's Glory Bright

Author: Ambrose of Milan Meter: 8.8.8.8 Appears in 44 hymnals Scripture: Hebrews 1:3 Lyrics: 1 O splendor of God’s glory bright, From light eternal bringing light; Thou light of life, light’s living spring, True day, all days illumining. 2 Come, Holy Sun of heavenly love, Shower down Thy radiance from above, And to our inward hearts convey The Holy Spirit's cloudless ray. 3 O joyful be the passing day With thoughts as clear as morning’s ray, With faith like noontide shining bright, Our souls unshadowed by the night. 4 O Lord, with each returning morn Thine image to our hearts is born; O may we ever clearly see Our Savior and our God in Thee! Topics: Morning and Opening Hymns Used With Tune: PUER NOBIS NASCITUR Text Sources: Rejoice in the Lord, 1985, trans. composite

Tunes

tune icon
Tune authorities
Page scansFlexscoreAudio

DARWALL'S 148TH

Composer: Sydney H. Nicholson, 1875-1947; John Darwall Meter: 6.6.6.6.8.8 Appears in 316 hymnals Scripture: Hebrews 1:3 Tune Key: C Major Incipit: 13153 17654 32231 Used With Text: Rejoice, the Lord Is King
Page scansFlexscoreAudio

CRUSADER'S HYMN

Meter: 5.6.8.5.5.8 Appears in 274 hymnals Scripture: Hebrews 1:3-4 Tune Sources: Silesian folk song; Schlesische Volkslieder, Leipzig, 1842 Tune Key: E Flat Major Incipit: 11127 13333 42351 Used With Text: Fairest Lord Jesus
Page scansFlexscoreAudio

PUER NOBIS NASCITUR

Composer: Michael Praetorius; Goerge Ratcliffe Woodward Meter: 8.8.8.8 Appears in 170 hymnals Scripture: Hebrews 1:3 Tune Sources: Trier ms., 15th century Tune Key: D Major Incipit: 11234 32115 55671 Used With Text: O Splendor of God's Glory Bright

Instances

instance icon
Published text-tune combinations (hymns) from specific hymnals
TextPage scan

All hail the power of Jesus' name!

Author: Peronett Hymnal: The Voice of Praise #246 (1873) Meter: 8.6.8.6 Scripture: Hebrews 1:3 Lyrics: 1 All hail the power of Jesus' name! Let angels prostrate fall; Bring forth the royal diadem, And crown him Lord of all. 2 Ye chosen seed of Israel's race, A remnant weak and small, Hail him who saves you by his grace, And crown him Lord of all. 3 Ye Gentile sinners, ne'er forget The wormwood and the gall; Go, spread your trophies at his feet, And crown him Lord of all. 4 Let every kindred, every tribe, On this terrestrial ball, To him all majesty ascribe, And crown him Lord of all. 5 Oh, that with yonder sacred throng We at his feet may fall! We'll join the everlasting song, And crown him Lord of all. Topics: Christ Intercession and Reign; The Coronation
Text

How Sweet the Name of Jesus Sounds

Author: John Newton Hymnal: Hymns for the Living Church #68 (1974) Meter: 8.6.8.6 Scripture: Hebrews 1:4 Lyrics: 1 How sweet the name of Jesus sounds In a believer's ear! It soothes his sorrows, heals his wounds, And drives away his fear. 2 Dear name! the rock on which I build, My shield and hiding place, My never-failing treasure, filled With boundless stores of grace. 3 Jesus, my Shepherd, Brother, Friend, My Prophet, Priest and King, My Lord, my life, my way, my end, Accept the praise I bring. 4 Weak is the effort of my heart, And cold my warmest thought; But when I see Thee as Thou art, I'll praise Thee as I ought. 5 Till then I would Thy love proclaim With every fleeting breath; And may the music of Thy name Refresh my soul in death. Amen. Topics: Christ Name(s) of Tune Title: ST. PETER
TextPage scan

How Sweet the Name of Jesus Sounds

Author: John Newton Hymnal: Hymns of Faith #69 (1980) Scripture: Hebrews 1:4 Lyrics: 1 How sweet the name of Jesus sounds In a believer's ear! It soothes his sorrows, heals his wounds, And drives away his fear. 2 It makes the wounded spirit whole, And calms the troubled breast; 'Tis manna to the hungry soul, And to the weary, rest. 3 Dear name! the rock on which I build, My shield and hiding place; My never-failing treasure, filled With boundless stores of grace! 4 Jesus, my Shepherd, Brother, Friend, My Prophet, Priest and King, My Lord, my Life, my Way, my End, Accept the praise I bring. Amen. Topics: Christ Name; Praise of Christ; Christ Name; Praise of Christ Tune Title: [How sweet the name of Jesus sounds]

People

person icon
Authors, composers, editors, etc.

Charles Wesley

1707 - 1788 Scripture: Hebrews 1:3 Author of "Rejoice, the Lord Is King" in Psalter Hymnal (Gray) Charles Wesley, M.A. was the great hymn-writer of the Wesley family, perhaps, taking quantity and quality into consideration, the great hymn-writer of all ages. Charles Wesley was the youngest son and 18th child of Samuel and Susanna Wesley, and was born at Epworth Rectory, Dec. 18, 1707. In 1716 he went to Westminster School, being provided with a home and board by his elder brother Samuel, then usher at the school, until 1721, when he was elected King's Scholar, and as such received his board and education free. In 1726 Charles Wesley was elected to a Westminster studentship at Christ Church, Oxford, where he took his degree in 1729, and became a college tutor. In the early part of the same year his religious impressions were much deepened, and he became one of the first band of "Oxford Methodists." In 1735 he went with his brother John to Georgia, as secretary to General Oglethorpe, having before he set out received Deacon's and Priest's Orders on two successive Sundays. His stay in Georgia was very short; he returned to England in 1736, and in 1737 came under the influence of Count Zinzendorf and the Moravians, especially of that remarkable man who had so large a share in moulding John Wesley's career, Peter Bonier, and also of a Mr. Bray, a brazier in Little Britain. On Whitsunday, 1737, [sic. 1738] he "found rest to his soul," and in 1738 he became curate to his friend, Mr. Stonehouse, Vicar of Islington, but the opposition of the churchwardens was so great that the Vicar consented that he "should preach in his church no more." Henceforth his work was identified with that of his brother John, and he became an indefatigable itinerant and field preacher. On April 8, 1749, he married Miss Sarah Gwynne. His marriage, unlike that of his brother John, was a most happy one; his wife was accustomed to accompany him on his evangelistic journeys, which were as frequent as ever until the year 1756," when he ceased to itinerate, and mainly devoted himself to the care of the Societies in London and Bristol. Bristol was his headquarters until 1771, when he removed with his family to London, and, besides attending to the Societies, devoted himself much, as he had done in his youth, to the spiritual care of prisoners in Newgate. He had long been troubled about the relations of Methodism to the Church of England, and strongly disapproved of his brother John's "ordinations." Wesley-like, he expressed his disapproval in the most outspoken fashion, but, as in the case of Samuel at an earlier period, the differences between the brothers never led to a breach of friendship. He died in London, March 29, 1788, and was buried in Marylebone churchyard. His brother John was deeply grieved because he would not consent to be interred in the burial-ground of the City Road Chapel, where he had prepared a grave for himself, but Charles said, "I have lived, and I die, in the Communion of the Church of England, and I will be buried in the yard of my parish church." Eight clergymen of the Church of England bore his pall. He had a large family, four of whom survived him; three sons, who all became distinguished in the musical world, and one daughter, who inherited some of her father's poetical genius. The widow and orphans were treated with the greatest kindness and generosity by John Wesley. As a hymn-writer Charles Wesley was unique. He is said to have written no less than 6500 hymns, and though, of course, in so vast a number some are of unequal merit, it is perfectly marvellous how many there are which rise to the highest degree of excellence. His feelings on every occasion of importance, whether private or public, found their best expression in a hymn. His own conversion, his own marriage, the earthquake panic, the rumours of an invasion from France, the defeat of Prince Charles Edward at Culloden, the Gordon riots, every Festival of the Christian Church, every doctrine of the Christian Faith, striking scenes in Scripture history, striking scenes which came within his own view, the deaths of friends as they passed away, one by one, before him, all furnished occasions for the exercise of his divine gift. Nor must we forget his hymns for little children, a branch of sacred poetry in which the mantle of Dr. Watts seems to have fallen upon him. It would be simply impossible within our space to enumerate even those of the hymns which have become really classical. The saying that a really good hymn is as rare an appearance as that of a comet is falsified by the work of Charles Wesley; for hymns, which are really good in every respect, flowed from his pen in quick succession, and death alone stopped the course of the perennial stream. It has been the common practice, however for a hundred years or more to ascribe all translations from the German to John Wesley, as he only of the two brothers knew that language; and to assign to Charles Wesley all the original hymns except such as are traceable to John Wesley through his Journals and other works. The list of 482 original hymns by John and Charles Wesley listed in this Dictionary of Hymnology have formed an important part of Methodist hymnody and show the enormous influence of the Wesleys on the English hymnody of the nineteenth century. -- Excerpts from John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907) ================== Charles Wesley, the son of Samuel Wesley, was born at Epworth, Dec. 18, 1707. He was educated at Westminster School and afterwards at Christ Church, Oxford, where he graduated M.A. In 1735, he took Orders and immediately proceeded with his brother John to Georgia, both being employed as missionaries of the S.P.G. He returned to England in 1736. For many years he engaged with his brother in preaching the Gospel. He died March 29, 1788. To Charles Wesley has been justly assigned the appellation of the "Bard of Methodism." His prominence in hymn writing may be judged from the fact that in the "Wesleyan Hymn Book," 623 of the 770 hymns were written by him; and he published more than thirty poetical works, written either by himself alone, or in conjunction with his brother. The number of his separate hymns is at least five thousand. --Annotations of the Hymnal, Charles Hutchins, M.A., 1872.

John Darwall

1732 - 1789 Scripture: Hebrews 1:3 Composer of "DARWALL'S 148TH" in Psalter Hymnal (Gray) John Darwall (b. Haughton, Staffordshire, England, 1731; d. Walsall, Staffordshire, England, 1789) The son of a pastor, he attended Manchester Grammar School and Brasenose College, Oxford, England (1752-1756). He became the curate and later the vicar of St. Matthew's Parish Church in Walsall, where he remained until his death. Darwall was a poet and amateur musician. He composed a soprano tune and bass line for each of the 150 psalm versifications in the Tate and Brady New Version of the Psalms of David (l696). In an organ dedication speech in 1773 Darwall advocated singing the "Psalm tunes in quicker time than common [in order that] six verses might be sung in the same space of time that four generally are." Bert Polman

St. Ambrose

340 - 397 Person Name: Ambrose of Milan Scripture: Hebrews 1:3 Author of "O Splendor of God's Glory Bright" in The Presbyterian Hymnal Ambrose (b. Treves, Germany, 340; d. Milan, Italy, 397), one of the great Latin church fathers, is remembered best for his preaching, his struggle against the Arian heresy, and his introduction of metrical and antiphonal singing into the Western church. Ambrose was trained in legal studies and distinguished himself in a civic career, becoming a consul in Northern Italy. When the bishop of Milan, an Arian, died in 374, the people demanded that Ambrose, who was not ordained or even baptized, become the bishop. He was promptly baptized and ordained, and he remained bishop of Milan until his death. Ambrose successfully resisted the Arian heresy and the attempts of the Roman emperors to dominate the church. His most famous convert and disciple was Augustine. Of the many hymns sometimes attributed to Ambrose, only a handful are thought to be authentic. Bert Polman ===================== Ambrosius (St. Ambrose), second son and third child of Ambrosius, Prefect of the Gauls, was born at Lyons, Aries, or Treves--probably the last--in 340 A.D. On the death of his father in 353 his mother removed to Rome with her three children. Ambrose went through the usual course of education, attaining considerable proficiency in Greek; and then entered the profession which his elder brother Satyrus had chosen, that of the law. In this he so distinguished himself that, after practising in the court of Probus, the Praetorian Prefect of Italy, he was, in 374, appointed Consular of Liguria and Aemilia. This office necessitated his residence in Milan. Not many months after, Auxentius, bishop of Milan, who had joined the Arian party, died; and much was felt to depend upon the person appointed as his successor. The church in which the election was held was so filled with excited people that the Consular found it necessary to take steps fur preserving the peace, and himself exhorted them to peace and order: when a voice suddenly exclaimed, "Ambrose is Bishop," and the cry was taken up on all sides. He was compelled to accept the post, though still only a catechumen; was forthwith baptized, and in a week more consecrated Bishop, Dec. 7, 374. The death of the Emperor Valentinian I., in 375, brought him into collision with Justina, Valentinian's second wife, an adherent of the Arian party: Ambrose was supported by Gratian, the elder son of Valentinian, and by Theodosius, whom Gratian in 379 associated with himself in the empire. Gratian was assassinated in 383 by a partisau of Maximus, and Ambrose was sent to treat with the usurper, a piece of diplomacy in which he was fairly successful. He found himself, however, left to carry on the contest with the Arians and the Empress almost alone. He and the faithful gallantly defended the churches which the heretics attempted to seize. Justina was foiled: and the advance of Maximus on Milan led to her flight, and eventually to her death in 388. It was in this year, or more probably the year before (387), that Ambrose received into the Church by baptism his great scholar Augustine, once a Manichaean heretic. Theodosius was now virtually head of the Roman empire, his colleague Valentinian II., Justina's son, being a youth of only 17. In the early part of 390 the news of a riot at Thessalonica, brought to him at Milan, caused him to give a hasty order for a general massacre at that city, and his command was but too faithfully obeyed. On his presenting himself a few days after at the door of the principal church in Milan, he was met by Ambrose, who refused him entrance till he should have done penance for his crime. It was not till Christmas, eight months after, that the Emperor declared his penitence, and was received into communion again by the Bishop. Valentinian was murdered by Arbogastes, a Frank general, in 392; and the murderer and his puppet emperor Eugenius were defeated by Theodosius in 394. But the fatigues of the campaign told on the Emperor, and he died the following year. Ambrose preached his funeral sermon, as he had done that of Valentinian.   The loss of these two friends and supporters was a severe blow to Ambrose; two unquiet years passed, and then, worn with labours and anxieties, he himself rested from his labours on Easter Eve, 397. It was the 4th of April, and on that day the great Bishop of Milan is remembered by the Western Church, but Rome commemorates his consecration only, Dec. 7th. Great he was indeed, as a scholar, an organiser, a statesman; still greater as a theologian, the earnest and brilliant defender of the Catholic faith against the Arians of the West, just as Athanasius (whose name, one cannot but remark, is the same as his in meaning) was its champion against those of the East. We are now mainly concerned with him as musician and poet, "the father of Church song" as he is called by Grimm. He introduced from the East the practice of antiphonal chanting, and began the task, which St. Gregory completed, of systematizing the music of the Church. As a writer of sacred poetry he is remarkable for depth and severity. He does not warm with his subject, like Adam of St. Victor, or St. Bernard. "We feel," says Abp. Trench, "as though there were a certain coldness in his hymns, an aloofness of the author from his subject. "A large number of hymns has been attributed to his pen; Daniel gives no fewer than 92 called Ambrosian. Of these the great majority (including one on himself) cannot possibly be his; there is more or less doubt about the rest. The authorities on the subject are the Benedictine ed. of his works, the Psalterium, or Hymnary, of Cardinal Thomasius, and the Thesaurus Hymnologicus of Daniel. The Benedictine editors give 12 hymns as assignable to him, as follows:—1.  Aeterna Christi munera. 2.  Aeterne rerum Conditor. 3.  Consors Paterni luminii. 4.  Deus Creator omnium. 5.  Fit porta Christi pervia, 6.  Illuminans Altissimus. 7.  Jam surgit hora tertia. 8.  0 Lux Beata Trinitas. 9.  Orabo mente Dominum. 10.  Somno refectis artubus. 11.  Splendor Paternae gloriae. 12.  Veni Redemptor gentium. Histories of these hymns, together with details of translations into English, are given in this work, and may be found under their respective first lines. The Bollandists and Daniel are inclined to attribute to St. Ambrose a hymn, Grates tibi Jesu novas, on the finding of the relics of SS. Gervasius and Protasius. These, we know, were discovered by him in 386, and it is by no means unlikely that the bishop should have commemorated in verse an event which he announces by letter to his sister Marcellina with so much satisfaction, not to say exultation.A beautiful tradition makes the Te Deum laudamus to have been composed under inspiration, and recited alternately, by SS. Ambrose and Augustine immediately after the baptism of the latter in 387. But the story rests upon a passage which there is every reason to consider spurious, in the Chronicon of Dacius, Bishop of Milan in 550. There is no hint of such an occurrence in the Confessions of St. Augustine, nor in Paulinue's life of St. Ambrose, nor in any authentic writing of St. Ambrose himself. The hymn is essentially a compilation, and there is much reason to believe, with Merati, that it originated in the 5th century, in the monastery of St. Honoratus at Lerins. [Te Deum.] -- John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907) Also known as: Ambrotio, Saint, Bishop of Milan Ambroise, Saint, Bishop of Milan Ambrosio de Milán Ambrosius Mediolanensis Ambrosius Saint, Bp. of Milan Ambrosius von Mailand Aurelio Ambrogio, Saint, Bishop of Milan Aurelius Ambrosius, Saint, Bishop of Milan



Advertisements


It looks like you are using an ad-blocker. Ad revenue helps keep us running. Please consider white-listing Hymnary.org or subscribing to eliminate ads entirely and help support Hymnary.org.