Search Results

Scripture:isaiah 63:7-9

Texts

text icon
Text authorities
Page scans

The loving-kindness of the Lord

Author: Samuel Medley (1738-1799) Appears in 998 hymnals Scripture: Isaiah 63:7 First Line: Awake, my soul, in joyful lays Topics: Christ Loving-Kindness of; Grace Magnified; Joy Spiritual; Praise To Christ; Sinners Rejoicing in Hope Used With Tune: LOVING-KINDNESS
Text

Hymn 29

Author: Isaac Watts Meter: 8.6.8.6 Appears in 16 hymnals Scripture: Isaiah 63:4-7 First Line: I lift my banner, saith the Lord Lyrics: "I lift my banner," saith the Lord, "Where Antichrist has stood; The city of my gospel foes Shall be a field of blood. "My heart has studied just revenge, And now the day appears; The day of my redeemed is come To wipe away their tears. "Quite weary is my patience grown, And bids my fury go; Swift as the lightning it shall move, And be as fatal too. "I call for helpers, but in vain; Then has my gospel none? Well, mine own arm has might enough To crush my foes alone. "Slaughter and my devouring sword Shall walk the streets around, Babel shall reel beneath my stroke, And stagger to the ground." Thy honors, O victorious King! Thine own right hand shall raise, While we thy awful vengeance sing, And our deliv'rer praise.
Page scans

Habitual Devotion

Author: Miss Helen Maris Williams (1762-1827) Appears in 656 hymnals Scripture: Isaiah 63:7 First Line: While Thee I seek, protecting Pow'r Topics: Afflictions Rejoicing in; Communion With God; God Omnipresent; God Presence of; God Providence of; Guidance; Peace Christian; Resignation; Trust In God Used With Tune: BRATTLE STREET

Tunes

tune icon
Tune authorities
Page scans

LOVING-KINDNESS

Appears in 125 hymnals Scripture: Isaiah 63:7 Incipit: 51112 31222 34543 Used With Text: The loving-kindness of the Lord
Page scansFlexscoreAudio

PASSION CHORALE

Composer: Hans Leo Hassler; Johann Sebastian Bach Meter: 7.6.7.6 D Appears in 312 hymnals Scripture: Isaiah 63:9 Tune Key: C Major Incipit: 51765 45233 2121 Used With Text: O Sacred Head, Now Wounded
Page scans

BRATTLE STREET

Composer: Ignz Joseph Pleyel (1757-1831); Nahum Mitchell (17701-1851) Appears in 24 hymnals Scripture: Isaiah 63:7 Incipit: 55153 44221 23153 Used With Text: Habitual Devotion

Instances

instance icon
Published text-tune combinations (hymns) from specific hymnals
TextPage scanAudioFlexscore

I Love to Tell the Story

Author: Katherine Hankey; William G. Fischer Hymnal: Glory to God #462 (2013) Meter: 7.6.7.6 D with refrain Scripture: Isaiah 63:7 Lyrics: 1 I love to tell the story of unseen things above, of Jesus and his glory, of Jesus and his love. I love to tell the story, because I know 'tis true; it satisfies my longings as nothing else could do. Refrain: I love to tell the story; 'twill be my theme in glory to tell the old, old story of Jesus and his love. 2 I love to tell the story; 'tis pleasant to repeat what seems, each time I tell it, more wonderfully sweet! I love to tell the story, for some have never heard the message of salvation from God’s own holy Word. [Refrain] 3 I love to tell the story, for those who know it best seem hungering and thirsting to hear it, like the rest. And when, in scenes of glory, I sing the new, new song, 'twill be the old, old story that I have loved so long. [Refrain] Topics: Evangelism; Scripture; The Word Languages: English Tune Title: HANKEY
TextPage scan

I Love to Tell the Story

Author: Arabelle Katherine Hankey Hymnal: Moravian Book of Worship #625 (1995) Meter: 7.6.7.6 D with refrain Scripture: Isaiah 63:7 Lyrics: 1 I love to tell the story of unseen things above, of Jesus and his glory, of Jesus and his love. I love to tell the story, because I know it's true; it satisfies my longings as nothing else could do. Refrain: I love to tell the story; I'll sing this theme in glory and tell the old, old story of Jesus and his love. 2 I love to tell the story; how pleasant to repeat what seems, each time I tell it, more wonderfully sweet! I love to tell the story, for some have never heard the message of salvation from God’s own holy word. [Refrain] 3 I love to tell the story, for those who know it best seem hungering and thirsting to hear it, like the rest. And when, in scenes of glory, I sing the new, new song, I'll sing the old, old story that I have loved so long. [Refrain] Topics: Spread of the Gospel; Spread of the Gospel; Trust and Confidence Languages: English Tune Title: HANKEY
TextPage scan

The Loving-Kindness of the Redeemer

Hymnal: The Hartford Selection of Hymns from the Most Approved Authors #VIII (1799) Meter: 8.8.8.8 Scripture: Isaiah 63:7 First Line: Awake, my soul, to joyful lays Lyrics: 1 Awake, my soul, to joyful lays, And sing thy great Redeemer’s praise; He justly claims a song from me, His loving-kindness O how free! 2 He saw me ruin'd in the fall, Yet lov'd me, notwithstanding all; He sav'd me from my lost estate; His loving-kindness O how great! 3 Tho' numerous hosts of mighty foes, Tho' earth and hell my way oppose, He safely leads my soul along, His loving-kindness O how strong! 4 When trouble, like a gloomy cloud, Has gather'd thick, and thunder'd loud, He near my soul has always stood, His loving-kindness O how good! 5 Often I feel my sinful heart Prone from my Jesus to depart; But tho' I have him oft forgot, His loving-kindness changes not. 6 Soon shall I pass the gloomy vale, Soon all my mortal powers must fail; O! may my last expiring breath His loving-kindness sing in death. 7 Then let me mount and soar away, To the bright worlds of endless day, And sing with rapture and surprise, His loving-kindness in the skies. Topics: Redeemer His lovingkindness; Redeemer His lovingkindness Languages: English

People

person icon
Authors, composers, editors, etc.

Samuel Medley

1738 - 1799 Person Name: Samuel Medley (1738-1799) Scripture: Isaiah 63:7 Author of "The loving-kindness of the Lord" in Songs of Praise with Tunes Medley, Samuel, born June 23, 1738, at Cheshunt, Herts, where his father kept a school. He received a good education; but not liking the business to which he was apprenticed, he entered the Royal Navy. Having been severely wounded in a battle with the French fleet off Port Lagos, in 1759, he was obliged to retire from active service. A sermon by Dr. Watts, read to him about this time, led to his conversion. He joined the Baptist Church in Eagle Street, London, then under the care of Dr. Gifford, and shortly afterwards opened a school, which for several years he conducted with great success. Having begun to preach, he received, in 1767, a call to become pastor of the Baptist church at Watford. Thence, in 1772, he removed to Byrom Street, Liverpool, where he gathered a large congregation, and for 27 years was remarkably popular and useful. After a long and painful illness he died July 17, 1799. Most of Medley's hymns were first printed on leaflets or in magazines (the Gospel Magazine being one). They appeared in book form as:— (1) Hymns, &c. Bradford, 1785. This contains 42 hymns. (2) Hymns on Select Portions of Scripture by the Rev. Mr. Medley. 2nd ed. Bristol. W. Pine. 1785. This contains 34 hymns, and differs much from the Bradford edition both in the text and in the order of the hymns. (3) An enlargement of the same in 1787. (4) A small collection of new Hymns, London, 1794. This contains 23 hymns. (5) Hymns. The Public Worship and Private Devotion of True Christians Assisted in some thoughts in Verse; principally drawn from Select Passages of the Word of God. By Samuel Medley. London. Printed for J. Johnson. 1800. A few of his hymns are also found in a Collection for the use of All Denominations, published in London in 1782. Medley's hymns have been very popular in his own denomination, particularly among the more Calvinistic churches. In Denham's Selections there are 48, and in J. Stevens's Selections, 30. Their charm consists less in their poetry than in the warmth and occasional pathos with which they give expression to Christian experience. In most of them also there is a refrain in the last line of each verse which is often effective. Those in common use include:— 1. Come, join ye saints, with heart and voice. (1800). Complete in Christ. 2. Death is no more among our foes. Easter. 3. Eternal Sovereign Lord of all. (1789). Praise for Providential Care. 4. Far, far beyond these lower skies. (1789). Jesus, the Forerunner. 5. Father of mercies, God of love, whose kind, &c. (1789.) New Year. 6. Great God, today Thy grace impart. Sermon. 7. Hear, gracious God! a sinner's cry. (1789). Lent. 8. In heaven the rapturous song began. Christmas. 9. Jesus, engrave it on my heart. (1789). Jesus, Needful to all. 10. Mortals, awake, with angels join. (1782). Christmas. 11. My soul, arise in joyful lays. (1789). Joy in God. 12. Now, in a song of grateful praise. Praise to Jesus. In the Gospel Magazine, June, 1776. 13. O could I speak the matchless worth. (1789.) Praise of Jesus. 14. O for a bright celestial ray. Lent. 15. O God, Thy mercy, vast and free. (1800). Dedication of Self to God. 16. O let us tell the matchless love. Praise to Jesus. 17. O what amazing words of grace. (1789). Foutain of Living Waters. 18. Saints die, and we should gently weep. (1800). Death and Burial. From his "Dearest of Names, Our Lord and King." 19. See a poor sinner, dearest Lord. Lent. 20. Sing the dear Saviour's glorious fame. (1789). Jesus the Breaker of bonds. In 1800 a Memoir of Medley was published by his son, which is regarded by members of the family now living as authoritative. But in 1833 appeared another Memoir by Medley's daughter Sarah, to which are appended 52 hymns for use on Sacramental occasions. These she gives as her father's. But 8 of them are undoubtedly by Thos. Kelly, published by him in 1815, and reprinted in subsequent editions of his Hymns. The remainder are by Medley. Nearly all of these 52 hymns (both Medley's and Kelly's) have been altered in order to adapt them to Sacramental use. In Sarah Medley's volume, Kelly's hymns all follow one another, and three of them are in a metre which Medley apparently never used. What could have been Sarah Medley's motive in all this it is hard to divine. She is said to have been a clever, though unamiable woman, and was herself the author of a small volume of Poems published in 1807. In the Memoir she does not conceal her hatred of her brother. [Rev. W. R. Stevenson, M.A.] -- John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907)

James W. Alexander

1804 - 1859 Person Name: James Waddell Alexander Scripture: Isaiah 63:9 Translator of "O Sacred Head, Now Wounded" in Glory to God James W. Alexander (b. Hopewell, Louisa County, VA, 1804; d. Sweetsprings, VA, 1859) was often overshadowed by his father, the renowned Archibald Alexander, first professor at Princeton Theological Seminary. But James Alexander was also a fine preacher, teacher, and writer. He studied at New Jersey College (now Princeton University) and Princeton Seminary. Ordained in the Presbyterian Church, he alternated his career between teaching and pastoring; for two years (1849-1851) he was professor of ecclesiastical history and church government at Princeton Seminary. Alexander translated a number of hymns from Greek, Latin, and German but is mainly known today for his translation of "O Sacred Head." Bert Polman ===================== Alexander, James Waddell, D.D., son of Archibald Alexander, D.D., b. at Hopewell, Louisa, county of Virginia, 13 Mar., 1804, graduated at Princeton, 1820, and was successively Professor of Rhetoric at Princeton, 1833; Pastor of Duane Street Presbyterian Church, New York, 1844; Professor of Church History, Princeton, 1849; and Pastor of 5th Avenue Presbyterian Church, New York, 1851; d. at Sweetsprings, Virginia, July 31, 1859. His works include Gift to the Afflicted, Thoughts on Family Worship, and others. His Letters were published by the Rev. Dr. Hall, in 2 vols., some time after his death, and his translations were collected and published at New York in 1861, under the title, The Breaking Crucible and other Translations. Of these translations the following are in use: O Sacred Head, now wounded” a translation of "Salve Caput," through the German; "Near the cross was Mary weeping," a translation of "Stabat Mater"; and "Jesus, how sweet Thy memory is," a translation of "dulcis memoria." The annotations of these translations are given under their respective Latin first lines. --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907)

Hans Leo Hassler

1564 - 1612 Scripture: Isaiah 63:9 Composer of "PASSION CHORALE" in Glory to God Hans Leo Hassler (b. Nuremberg, Germany, 1564; d. Frankfurt, Germany, 1612) came from a family of famous musicians. He received his early education from his father in Nuremberg, then studied in Venice with Andrea Gabrieli and became friends with Giovanni Gabrieli. In Venice he learned the polychoral style, for which the Gabrielis were justly famous, and brought this practice back with him to Germany. Hassler served as organist and composer for Octavian Fugger, the princely art patron of Augsburg (1585-1601), as director of town music and organist in the Frauenkirche in Nuremberg (1601-1608), and finally as court musician for the Elector of Saxony in Dresden (1608-1612). A Lutheran, Hassler composed for both the Roman Catholic liturgy and for Lutheran churches. Among his many works are two volumes of motets (1591, 1601), a famous collection of court songs, Lustgarten neuer Deutscher Gesang (1601), chorale motets, Psalmen und christliche Gesänge (1607), and a volume of simpler hymn settings, Kirchengesänge, Psalmen und geistliche Lieder (1608).



Advertisements


It looks like you are using an ad-blocker. Ad revenue helps keep us running. Please consider white-listing Hymnary.org or subscribing to eliminate ads entirely and help support Hymnary.org.