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Text Identifier:"^o_lord_give_ear_to_my_just_cause$"

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Exaudi Domine

Author: Thomas Sternhold Appears in 2 hymnals Hymnal Title: Calvin Hymnary Project First Line: O Lord give eare to my just cause

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O Lord, give ear to my just cause

Author: T. S. Hymnal: The Whole Book of Psalms #XVII (1790) Hymnal Title: The Whole Book of Psalms Lyrics: 1 O Lord, give ear to my just cause, attend unto my cry, And hear the prayer I offer up to thee unfeignedly; 2 And let the judgment of my cause proceed always from thee, And let thine eyes behold and clear truth and simplicity. 3 Thou hast well try'd me in the night, and yet could'st nothing find, That I have spoken with my tongue, that was not in my mind. 4 As for the works of wicked men, and paths perverse and ill, For love of thy most holy Name I have refrained still. 5 Then in thy paths that be most pure guide me, Lord and preserve, That from the way wherein I walk my steps may never swerve. 6 For I do call to thee, O Lord, surely thou wilt me aid; Then hear my prayer, and weigh right well the words that I have said. 7 O thou, the Saviour of all them that put their trust in thee, Declare thy strength on them that spurn against thy Majesty. 8 O keep me as thou wouldest keep the apple of thine eye, And under cover of thy wings defend me secretly. The Second Part 9 From wicked men that trouble me, and daily me annoy, And from my foes that go about my soul for to destroy: 10 Who wallow in their worldly wealth, and are so full and fat, That in their pride they do not spare to speak they care not what. 11 They lie in wait where I should pass, with craft me to confound; And musing mischief in their minds, to cast me to the ground: 12 Much like a lion greedily that would his prey embrace, Or lurking like a lion's whelp within some secret place. 13 Up, Lord, in haste, prevent my foe, and cast him at my feet; Save thou my soul from the ill man, and with thy sword him smite. 14 Deliver me, Lord, by thy power, out of these tyrants hands, Who now so long time reigned have, and kept us in their bands; 15 I mean from worldly men, who do in worldly goods abound, That have no hope or joy but what in this life can be found. 16 Thou of thy store their bellies fill'st with pleasure to their mind; Their children have enough, and leave the rest to theirs behind. 17 But as for me, I will behold thy face in righteousness, And shall be satisfy'd when I awake with thy likeness. Scripture: Psalm 17 Languages: English
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Exaudi Domine

Author: T. S. Hymnal: The Whole Booke of Psalmes #6c (1640) Hymnal Title: The Whole Booke of Psalmes First Line: O Lord give eare to my just cause Lyrics: 1 O Lord give eare to my just cause, attend when I complaine: And heare the prayer that I put forth with lips that do not faine. 2 And let the judgement of my cause proceed alwaies from thee: And let thine eyes behold and cleare this my simplicity. 3 Thou hast well tri'd me in the night, and yet couldst nothing find That I have spoken with my tongue, that was not in my mind. 4 As for the works of wicked men, and paths perverse and ill, For love of thy most holy Name I have refrained still. 5 Then in thy paths that be most pure, stay me Lord and preserve, That from the way wherein I walk, my steps may never swerve. 6 For I do call to thee, O Lord, surely thou wilt me aid; Then heare my prayer & weigh right well the words that I have said. 7 O thou, the Saviour of all them that put their trust in thee; Declare thy strength on them that spurn against thy Majesty. 8 O keep me as thou wouldest keep the apple of thine eye, And under cover of thy wings defend me secretly; The second Part: 9 From wicked men that trouble me, and daily me annoy; And from my foes that go about my soule for to destroy. 10 Which wallow in their worldly wealth and are so full and fat: That in their pride they do not spare to speake they care not what. 11 They lie in wait where I should passe, with craft me to confound; And musing mischief in their minds to cast me to the ground. 12 Much like a Lion greedily that would his prey embrace; Or lurking like a Lion's whelp, within some secret place. 13 Up, Lord, in hast prevent my foe, and cast him at my feet: Save thou my soule from the ill man, and with thy sword him smite. 14 Deliver me Lord by thy power, out of these tyrants hands: Which now so long time raigned have, and kept us in their bands. 15 I meane from worldly men, to whom all worldly goods are rise: That have no hope nor part of joy, but in this present life. 16 Thou of thy store their bellies fil'st with pleasure to their mind: Their children have enough, and leave to theirs the rest behind. 17 But I shall with pure conscience behold thy gracious face: So when I wake I shall be full of thine image and grace. Scripture: Psalm 17 Languages: English

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Thomas Sternhold

1449 - 1549 Hymnal Title: Calvin Hymnary Project Author of "Exaudi Domine" Thomas Sternhold was Groom of the Robes to Henry VIII and Edward VI. With Hopkins, he produced the first English version of the Psalms before alluded to. He completed fifty-one; Hopkins and others composed the remainder. He died in 1549. Thirty-seven of his psalms were edited and published after his death, by his friend Hopkins. The work is entitled "All such Psalms of David as Thomas Sternhold, late Groome of the King's Majestye's Robes, did in his Lyfetime drawe into Englyshe Metre." Of the version annexed to the Prayer Book, Montgomery says: "The merit of faithful adherence to the original has been claimed for this version, and need not to be denied, but it is the resemblance which the dead bear to the living." Wood, in his "Athenae Oxonlenses" (1691, vol. I, p. 62), has the following account of the origin of Sternhold's psalms: "Being a most zealous reformer, and a very strict liver, he became so scandalized at the amorous and obscene songs used in the Court, that he, forsooth, turned into English metre fifty-one of David's psalms, and caused musical notes to be set to them, thinking thereby that the courtiers would sing them instead of their sonnets; but they did not, some few excepted. However, the poetry and music being admirable, and the best that was made and composed in these times, they were thought fit to be sung in all parochial churches." Of Sternhold and Hopkins, old Fuller says: "They were men whose piety was better than their poetry, and they had drunk more of Jordan than of Helicon." Sternhold and Hopkins may be taken as the representatives of the strong tendency to versify Scripture that came with the Reformation into England--a work men eagerly entered on without the talent requisite for its successful accomplishment. The tendency went so far, that even the "Acts of the Apostles" was put into rhyme, and set to music by Dr. Christopher Tye. --Annotations of the Hymnal, Charles Hutchins, M.A. 1872.



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