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Tune Identifier:"^gladden_ziegler$"

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GLADDEN

Appears in 5 hymnals Matching Instances: 5 Composer and/or Arranger: Charles L. Ziegler Incipit: 55176 54334 56143 Used With Text: Going About Doing Good

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O Master, let me walk with thee

Author: Washington Gladden Appears in 567 hymnals Matching Instances: 3 Used With Tune: GLADDEN
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The world is glad, the world is bright

Author: Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910 Appears in 6 hymnals Matching Instances: 1 Used With Tune: GLADDEN

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Going About Doing Good

Author: Washington Gladden Hymnal: The Pilgrim Hymnal #361a (1912) First Line: O Master, let me walk with thee Topics: Service and Brotherhood Tune Title: GLADDEN
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O Master, let me walk with thee

Author: Washington Gladden Hymnal: The Pilgrim Hymnal #279b (1904) Languages: English Tune Title: GLADDEN
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O Master, let me walk with thee

Author: Washington Gladden Hymnal: Pilgrim Songs (Number Two) #199 (1902) Languages: English Tune Title: GLADDEN

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Charles L. Ziegler

Composer of "GLADDEN" in The Pilgrim Hymnal

Washington Gladden

1836 - 1918 Author of "Going About Doing Good" in The Pilgrim Hymnal Washington Gladden (1836-1918) was called to the First Congregational Church in Columbus, OH in 1882 and remained there for 32 years. In 1883-84 he was known for his success in fighting the corrupt Tweed Ring, for arbitrating the Telegraphers' Strike and the Hocking Valley Coal Strike. He attacked John D. Rockefeller, Sr. for giving $100,000 of "tainted money" to the Congregational Church's Foreign Missions program. Throughout his ministry he emphasized applying the gospel to life in America. He wrote "O Master, let me walk with thee" in 1879. Mary Louise VanDyke =================== Gladden, Washington, was born at Pottsgrove, Pennsylvania, Feb. 11, 1836; was educated at Williams College: and entered the Congregational Ministry. He was for some time editor of the New York Independent, and of the Sunday Afternoon. In the Sunday Afternoon, his hymn, "O Master, let me walk with Thee" (Walking with God), appeared in 3 stanzas of 8 lines, in March 1879. Of these stanzas i. and iii. are in Laudes Domini, 1884, and others. --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology, Appendix, Part II (1907) ================== Gladden, W., p. 1565, ii. Dr. Gladden has been Pastor of the First Congregational Church, Columbus, Ohio, since 1882. His hymn-writing has not been extensive. The most popular of his hymns is "0 Master, let me walk with Thee," noted on p. 1565, ii. It has come into somewhat extensive use during the last ten years. Additional hymns in common use include:— 1. Behold a Sower from afar. [The Kingdom of God.] In the Boston Pilgrim Hymnal, 1904, this is dated 1897. 2. Forgive, 0 Lord, the doubts that break Thy promises to me. [Doubting repented of.] Dated 1879, in The Pilgrim Hymnal, 1904. --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology, New Supplement (1907)

Julia Ward Howe

1819 - 1910 Person Name: Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910 Author of "The world is glad, the world is bright" in The Century Hymnal Born: May 27, 1819, New York City. Died: October 17, 1910, Middletown, Rhode Island. Buried: Mount Auburn Cemetery, Cambridge, Massachusetts. Howe, Julia, née Ward, born in New York City in 1819, and married in 1843 the American philanthropist S. G. Howe. She has taken great interest in political matters, and is well known through her prose and poetical works. Of the latter there are Passion Flower, 1854; Words of the Hour, 1856; Later Lyrics, 1866; and From Sunset Ridge, 1896. Her Battle Hymn of the Republic, "eyes have seen the glory of the coming of the Lord," was written in 1861 at the outbreak of the Civil War, and was called forth by the sight of troops for the seat of war, and published in her Later Lyrics, 1806, p. 41. It is found in several American collections, including The Pilgrim Hymnal, 1904, and others. [M. C. Hazard, Ph.D.] --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology, New Supplement (1907) ============================ Howe, Julia Ward. (New York, New York, May 27, 1819--October 17, 1910). Married Samuel Gridley Howe on April 26, 1843. She was a woman with a distinguished personality and intellect; an abolitionist and active in social reforms; author of several book in prose and verse. The latter include Passion Flower, 1854; Words of the Hours, 1856; Later Lyrics, 1866; and From a Sunset Ridge, 1896. She became famous as the author of the poem entitled "Battle Hymn of the Republic," which, in spite of its title, was written as a patriotic song and not as a hymn for use in public worship, but which has been included in many American hymn books. It was written on November 19, 1861, while she and her husband, accompanied by their pastor, Rev. James Freeman Clarke, minister of the (Unitarian) Church of the Disciples, Boston, were visiting Washington soon after the outbreak of the Civil War. She had seen the troops gathered there and had heard them singing "John Brown's body lies a-mouldering in the grave" to a popular tune called "Glory, Hallelujah" composed a few years earlier by William Steffe of Charleston, South Carolina, for Sunday School use. Dr. Clarke asked Julie Howe if she could not write more uplifting words for the tune and as she woke early the next morning she found the verses forming in her mind as fast as she could write them down, so completely that later she re-wrote only a line or two in the last stanza and changed only four words in other stanzas. She sent the poem to The Atlantic Monthly, which paid her $4 and published it in its issue for February, 1862. It attracted little attention until it caught the eye of Chaplain C. C. McCable (later a Methodist bishop) who had a fine singing voice and who taught it first to the 122nd Ohio Volunteer Infantry regiment to which he was attached, then to other troops, and to prisoners in Libby Prison after he was made a prisoner of war. Thereafter it quickly came into use throughout the North as an expression of the patriotic emotion of the period. --Henry Wilder Foote, DNAH Archives