Dear Friend of Hymnary,

As you know, we don't ask for money too often. But we're asking now.

So before you hit the "close" button on this box, please consider a donation to keep Hymnary going.

More than half a million people come here every month -- worship leaders, hymnologists, hymn lovers and more -- people who now have access to the most complete database of North American hymnody on the planet thanks to this site. But keeping all of this afloat does not come without a cost, and we have limited sources of revenue. So if you benefit from Hymnary.org, would you please consider a donation today? Even small amounts help, and they also let us know you're behind us and support what we do.

You can make your tax-deductible contribution by clicking the Donate button below, or you can send a check to Hymnary at 3201 Burton SE, Grand Rapids, MI 49546.

On behalf of the entire Hymnary team,
Harry Plantinga

A Lamb Goes Uncomplaining Forth

A Lamb goes uncomplaining forth, The guilt of all men bearing

Author: Paul Gerhardt
Published in 18 hymnals

Audio files: Recording

Full Text

1 A Lamb goes uncomplaining forth,
The guilt of all men bearing;
'Tis laden with the sin of earth,
None else the burden sharing;
It goes its way, grows weak and faint,
To slaughter led without complaint,
Its spotless life to offer;
Bears shame, and stripes, and wounds, and death,
Anguish and mockery, and saith,
"Willing all this I suffer."

2 This Lamb is Christ, the soul's great Friend
And everlasting Savior;
Him, Him God chose, sin's reign to end
And bring us to His favor.
"Go forth, my Son!" He said, "and bail
The children, who are doomed to hell
But for Thine intercession.
The punishment is great, and dread
The wrath, but Thou Thy blood shalt shed,
And save them from perdition."

3 "Yea, Father, year, most willingly
I'll bear what Thou commandest;
My will conforms to Thy decree,
I do what Thou demandest."
O wondrous Love! what hast Thou done!
The Father offers up His Son,
The Son content descendeth!
O Love! O Love! how strong art Thou!
In shroud and grave Thou lay'st Him low
Whose word the mountains rendeth!

4 Thou lay'st him, Love, upon the cross,
With nails and spikes Him bruising;
Thou slay'st Him as a lamb, His loss,
From soul and body oozing;
From body 'tis the crimson flood
Of precious sacrificial blood,
From soul, the strength of anguish:
My gain it is; sweet Lamb to Thee
What can I give, whose love to me
For me doth make Thee languish?

5 Lord, all my life I'll cleave to Thee,
Thy love fore'er beholding,
Thee ever, as Thou ever me,
With loving arms enfolding.
Yea, Thou shalt be my Beacon-light,
To guide me safe through death's dark night,
And cheer my heart in sorrow;
Henceforth myself and all that's mine
to Thee, my Savior, I consign,
From whom all things I borrow.

6 By morn and eve my theme shall be
Thy mercy's wondrous measure;
To sacrifice myself to Thee,
My foremost aim and pleasure.
My stream of life shall flow for Thee,
Its steadfast current ceaselessly
In praise to Thee outpouring;
And all that Thou hast done for me,
I'll treasure in my memory,
Thy gracious love adoring.

7 Enlarge, shrine of my heart, and swell,
To Thee shall now be given
A treasure that doth far excel
The worth of earth and heaven.
Away with the Arabian gold,
With treasures of an earthly mold!
I've found a better jewel.
My priceless treasure, Lord my God,
Is Thy most holy, precious blood,
Which flowed from wounds so cruel.

8 This treasure ever I'll employ,
This ever aid shall yield me;
In sorrow it shall be my joy,
In conflict it shall shield me;
In joy, the music of my feast,
And when all else has lost its zest,
This manna still shall feed me;
In thirst my drink; in want my food;
My company in solitude,
To comfort and to lead me.

9 Death's poison cannot harm me now,
Thy blood new life bestoweth;
My Shadow from the heat art Thou,
When noonday's sunlight gloweth,
When I'm by inward grief opprest,
On Thee my weary soul shall rest,
As sick man on his pillows.
Thou art my Anchor, when be woe
My bark is driven to and fro
On trouble's restless billows.

10 And when Thy glory I shall see
And taste Thy kingdom's pleasure,
Thy blood my royal robe shall be,
And joy beyond at measure;
It then shall be my glorious crown
Thus I'll appear before the throne
Of God, and need not hide me;
And shall, by Him to Thee betrothed,
By Thee in bridal garments clothed,
Stand as a bride beside Thee.


Source: Evangelical Lutheran Hymn-book #191

Author: Paul Gerhardt

Gerhardt, Paulus, son of Christian Gerhardt, burgomaster of Gräfenhaynichen, near Wittenberg, was born at Grafenhaynichen, Mar. 12, 1607. On January 2, 1628, he matriculated at the University of Wittenberg. In the registers of St. Mary's church, Wittenberg, his name appears as a godfather, on July 13, 1641, described still as "studiosus," and he seems to have remained in Wittenberg till at least the end of April, 1642. He appears to have gone to Berlin in 1642 or 1643, and was there for some time (certainly after 1648) a tutor in the house of the advocate Andreas Barthold, whose daughter (Anna Maria, b. May 19, 1622, d. March 5, 1668) became his wife in 1655. During this period he seems to have frequently preached in Berlin. He was appoint… Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: A Lamb goes uncomplaining forth, The guilt of all men bearing
Title: A Lamb Goes Uncomplaining Forth
German Title: Ein Lämmlein geht und trägt die Schuld
Author: Paul Gerhardt
Meter: 8.7.8.7.8.8.7.8.8.7
Language: English

Tune

AN WASSERFLÜSSEN BABYLON

The tune AN WASSERFLÜSSEN BABYLON was composed by Wolfgang Dachstein (b. Gffenburg an der Kinzig, Germany, 1487; d. Strasbourg, Germany, 1553) and published in the Strassburger Kirchenampt (1525), edited by Dachstein and his friend Matthaus Greiter. In that collection it was the setting for Dachste…

Go to tune page >


DIES EST LAETITIAE


VID Ä</Font>LFVARNA I BABYLON</Font>


Timeline




Advertisements