The Sower

A sower was ending his homeward way

Author: Birdie Bell
Tune: [A sower was ending his homeward way]
Published in 2 hymnals

Audio files: MIDI

Representative Text

1 A sower was ending his homeward way,
And his steps were sad and slow,
So weary with toiling the livelong day,—
And I called in accents low,
“O, why are you sad at eventide?
You’ve scattered the good seed far and wide,
By streamlets fair and on mountain side,
You’ve worked till the sunset glow.”

You’ve worked to the sunset glow,
You’ve worked till the sunset glow,
By streamlets fair and on mountain side,
You’ve worked till the sunset glow.

2 The sower made answer in words like these,
“I have toiled since break of day,
My forehead was kissed by the morning breeze
And ‘twas scorched by noontide ray,
But I fear that the thorns will choke the seek,
The birds of the air may on it fee,
Perchance on the rocks ‘twill die indeed,
Then what will the Master say?”

Then what will the Master say?
Then what will the Master say?
Perchance on rocks it will die indeed,
Then what will the Master say?

3 “O sower, be trustful” I made reply,
“You have worked for Christ the Lord,
He sendeth the sunlight from smiling sky,
From His hand the rain is poured;
He’ll watch the seed which your hand did sow,
The dews will fall and the soft winds blow,
Till tall and fair shall the ripe grain grow—
For such is the promised word.”

For such is the promised word,
For such is the promised word,
Till tall and fair shall the ripe grain grow—
For such is the promised word.

4 A sower was wending his homeward way,
But his steps were glad and fleet;
He carrolled a song, ‘twas a happy lay,
And it told of faith so sweet;
For trust had come in the place of fear,
“In God’s good time will the grain appear,”
A glad “well done” will the toiler hear,
His heart shall with rapture beat.

His heart shall with rapture beat,
His heart shall with rapture beat,
A glad “well done” will the toiler hear,
His heart shall with rapture beat.

Source: Songs of Sovereign Grace #166

Author: Birdie Bell

C. Louise Bell, also known a Birdie Bell, was born, raised and lived in New York city. She began writing hymns when she was sixteen years old. She is the author of more than 500 hymns, 200 religious poems, and 200 Christmas and Easter lyrics, as well as short stories, and articles. She wrote under the name of Birdie Bell, which is what her family called her. Dianne Shapiro, from "The Singers and Their Songs: sketches of living gospel hymn writers" by Charles Hutchinson Gabriel (Chicago: The Rodeheaver Company, 1916) Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: A sower was ending his homeward way
Title: The Sower
Author: Birdie Bell
Refrain First Line: You’ve worked to the sunset glow
Publication Date: 1897
Copyright: This text in in the public domain in the United States because it was published before 1923.

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