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And wilt thou hear, O Lord

Full Text

1 And wilt Thou pardon, Lord,
A sinner such as I?
Although Thy book his crimes record,
Of such a crimson dye?

2 So deep are they engraved,
So terrible their fear;--
The righteous scarcely shall be saved,
And where shall I appear?

3 O Thou, Physician blest,
Make clean my guilty soul!
And me, by many a sin opprest,
Restore, and keep me whole!

4 I know not how to praise
Thy mercy and Thy love;
But deign Thy servant to upraise,
And I shall learn above.

Source: Church Book: for the use of Evangelical Lutheran congregations #358

Author: St. Joseph the Hymnographer

Joseph, St., the Hymnographer. A native of Sicily, and of the Sicilian school of poets is called by Dr. Neale (in his Hymns of the Eastern Church), Joseph of the Studium, in error. He left Sicily in 830 for a monastic life at Thessalonica. Thence he went to Constantinople; but left it, during the Iconoclastic persecution, for Rome. He was for many years a slave in Crete, having been captured by pirates. After regaining his liberty, he returned to Constantinople. He established there a monastery, in connection with the Church of St. John Chrysostom, which was filled with inmates by his eloquence. He was banished to the Chersonese for defence of the Icons, but was recalled by the empress Theodora, and made Sceuophylax (keeper of the sacred… Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: And wilt thou hear, O Lord
Author: St. Joseph the Hymnographer

Tune

ST. BRIDE

Samuel Howard (b. London, England, 1710; d. London, 1782) composed ST. BRIDE as a setting for Psalm 130 in William Riley's London psalter, Parochial Harmony (1762). The melody originally began with "gathering" notes at the beginning of each phrase. The tune's title is a contraction of St. Bridget, t…

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Timeline

Instances

Instances (1 - 8 of 8)Text InfoTune InfoTextScoreFlexScoreAudioPage Scan
Church Book: for the use of Evangelical Lutheran congregations #358Page Scan
Church Book: for the use of Evangelical Lutheran congregations #358TextPage Scan
Gloria in Excelsis #d23
Gloria in Excelsis #d16
Laudes Domini: a selection of spiritual songs ancient & modern (Abr. ed.) #254Page Scan
Laudes Domini: a selection of spiritual songs ancient and modern #557Page Scan
Laudes Domini: a selection of spiritual songs, ancient and modern for use in the prayer-meeting #225Page Scan
The New Laudes Domini: a selection of spiritual songs, ancient and modern for use in Baptist churches #572Page Scan



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