Angel hosts were heard on high

Alterer: Earl Marlatt

Marlatt, Earl Bowman. (Columbus, Indiana, May 24, 1892--June 13, 1976, Winchester, Ind.). One of twin boys, he was born into the family of a Methodist Episcopal minister at Columbus, Ind. Graduating from DePauw University, Phi Beta Kappa, in 1912, he continued his studies at Harvard and Boston Universities, Oxford, England, and the University of Berlin. Upon returning to America he spent one year in newspaper work at Kenosha, Wisconsin, and then joined the United States Army, serving as a second lieutenant of field artillery in World War I. He joined the staff at Boston University as Associate Professor of Philosophy in 1923, becoming Professor two years later, was Professor of Literature, Boston University School of Theology, and Dean,… Go to person page >

Alterer: John J. Overholt

John J. Overholt was born to an Amish family of limited means in the state of Ohio in 1918. As a child he was soon introduced to his father's personal collection of gospel songs and hymns, which was to have a marked influence on his later life. With his twin brother Joe, he early was exposed to the Amish-Mennonite tradition of hymn singing and praising worship. An early career in Christian service led to a two-year period of relief work in the country of Poland following World War II. During that interim he began to gather many European songs and hymns as a personal hobby, not realizing that these selections would become invaluable to The Christian Hymnary which was begun in 1960 and completed twelve years later in 1972, with a compilati… Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: Angel hosts were heard on high
French Title: Les Anges Dans Nos Campagnes
Alterer: John J. Overholt (1972)
Alterer: Earl Marlatt
Meter: 7.7.7.7 with refrain
Source: Traditional French carol
Language: English
Refrain First Line: Gloria in excelsis Deo
Publication Date: 1972
Copyright: Altered text Copyright © 1972 by The Christian Hymnary Publishers

Notes

Tune

GLORIA (French)

GLORIA is the French noel tune traditionally associated with this text. The popularity of this carol stems from its refrain–all those cascading phrases in which human beings imitate the angels' chorus. Try using the refrain by itself as a short choral introit during the Christmas season, perhaps w…

Go to tune page >


Instances

Instances (1 - 1 of 1)
Text Info

The Christian Hymnary. Bks. 1-4 #784

Suggestions or corrections? Contact us



Advertisements


It looks like you are using an ad-blocker. Ad revenue helps keep us running. Please consider white-listing Hymnary.org or subscribing to eliminate ads entirely and help support Hymnary.org.