Awake, awake, my sluggish soul

Awake, awake, my sluggish soul

Author: Ottiwell Heginbotham
Published in 38 hymnals

Representative Text

1 Awake, awake, each sluggish soul!
Awake, and view the setting sun!
See how the shades of death advance,
Ere half the task of life is done.

2 Soon will he close our drowsy eyes,
Nor shall we hear these warnings more;
Soon will the mighty Judge approach:
E'en now he stands before the door!

3 O Saviour! let these awful scenes
Be ever present to our view;
Teach us to gird our loins about,
And trim our dying lamps anew.

4 Then, when the king of terror comes,
Our souls shall hail the happy day.
Haste, then, O Saviour! from above,
Nor let thy chariot-wheels delay!

Source: The Voice of Praise: a collection of hymns for the use of the Methodist Church #821

Author: Ottiwell Heginbotham

Heginbothom, Ottiwell, born in 1744, and died in 1768, was for a short time the Minister of a Nonconformist congregation at Sudbury, Suffolk. The political and religious disputes which agitated the congregation, in the origin of which he had no part, and which resulted in a secession and the erection of another chapel, so preyed upon his mind, and affected his health, that his pastorate terminated with his death within three years of his appointment. His earliest hymn, "When sickness shakes the languid corse [frame]," was printed in the Christian Magazine, Feb. 1763. In 1791 the Rev. John Mead Ray communicated several of Heginbothom's hymns to the Protestant Magazine; and in the same year, these and others to the number of 25, were publishe… Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: Awake, awake, my sluggish soul
Author: Ottiwell Heginbotham

Notes

Awake, awake, my sluggish soul. O. Heginbothom. [Watchfulness.] First published in his Hymns, &c, 1794, in 6 stanzas of 4 lines, and based upon St. Luke xii. 38-39. In 1812 it was transferred to Collyer's Collection, No. 653, unaltered, and thus came in to common use. In some American collections, stanzas v. and vi. are omitted. In America it is also given as "Awake, awake, each drowsy soul," as in the Baptist Praise Book, 1871, No. 558. In the Baptist Church Praise Book, N. Y., 1872, we have stanza i., iii., and iv., and in Church Pastorals, Boston, 1864, stanzas i., iii., v. and vi. -- John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907)

Timeline

Instances

Instances (1 - 38 of 38)
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A Collection of Hymns and Prayers, for Public and Private Worship #170

A Collection of Hymns from Various Authors. New ed. #d28

Church Melodies, a Collection of Psalms, Hymns and Spiritual Songs #d82

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Church Pastorals, hymns and tunes for public and social worship #340

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Hymns for Christian Melody #205

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Hymns for Sunday Schools #308

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Hymns for the Sanctuary and Social Worship: with tunes #1082

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Hymns, Selected and Original, for Public and Private Worship #234

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Hymns, Selected and Original: for public and private worship (1st ed.) #234

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Hymns: selected and original, for public and private worship (30th ed.) #234

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Hymns: selected and original, for public and private worship (60th ed., 1st rev. ed.) #234

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Revival Hymns #13

Songs for Social and Public Worship. Rev. ed. #d33

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The Baptist Praise Book #558

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The Christian Melodist: a new collection of hymns for social religious worship #97

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The Devotional Hymn and Tune Book: for social and public worship #553

The Devotional Hymn Book #d43

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The Lyrica: a collection of psalms, hymns, and spiritual songs, adapted to general use #422

The Old Baptist Hymn Book #d29

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The Psalmody: a collection of hymns for public and social worship #413

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The Voice of Praise: a collection of hymns for the use of the Methodist Church #821

Village Hymns #d47

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