Come, let us join with faithful souls

Representative Text

1 Come, let us join with faithful souls
Our song of faith to sing;
One brotherhood in heart are we,
And One our Lord and King.

2 Faithful are all who love the truth
And dare the truth to tell,
Who steadfast stand at God’s right hand
And strive to serve Him well.

3 And faithful are the gentle hearts
To whom the pow'r is giv'n
Of ev'ry hearth to make a home,
Of ev'ry home a heav'n.

4 O Lord of hosts, our faith renew,
And grant us, in Thy love,
To sing the songs of victory
With faithful souls above.

Amen.

Source: Hymns for a Pilgrim People: a congregational hymnal #360

Author: W. G. Tarrant

Tarrant, William George, B.A., b. 1853. Since 1883 Minister of the Wandsworth Unitarian Christian Church. Editor of The Inquirer, 1888-97. One of the editors of the Essex Hall Hymnal. 1890, and of the Revised ed., 1902. 1. Come, let us Join with faithful souls. The Faithful. 2. Draw nigh to God; He will draw nigh to you. The Divine Helper. 3. Long ago the lilies faded. The Constant Presence. 4. The Light along the ages. Easter. 5. With happy voices ringing. Children's Praise. --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology, New Supplement (1907)  Go to person page >

Author: Ernest W. Shurtleff

Before studying at Andover, Ernest W. Shurtleff (Boston, MA, 1862; d. Paris, France, 1917) attended Harvard University. He served Congregational churches in Ventura, California; Old Plymouth, Massachusetts; and Minneapolis, Minnesota, before moving to Europe. In 1905 he established the American Church in Frankfurt, and in 1906 he moved to Paris, where he was involved in student ministry at the Academy Vitti. During World War I he and his wife were active in refugee relief work in Paris. Shurtleff wrote a number of books, including Poems (1883), Easter Gleams (1885), Song of Hope (1886), and Song on the Waters (1913). Bert Polman… Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: Come, let us join with faithful souls
Author: W. G. Tarrant
Author: Ernest W. Shurtleff
Language: English
Copyright: Public Domain

Tune

AZMON

Lowell Mason (PHH 96) adapted AZMON from a melody composed by Carl G. Gläser in 1828. Mason published a duple-meter version in his Modern Psalmist (1839) but changed it to triple meter in his later publications. Mason used (often obscure) biblical names for his tune titles; Azmon, a city south of C…

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ELLACOMBE

Published in a chapel hymnal for the Duke of Würtemberg (Gesangbuch der Herzogl, 1784), ELLACOMBE (the name of a village in Devonshire, England) was first set to the words "Ave Maria, klarer und lichter Morgenstern." During the first half of the nineteenth century various German hymnals altered the…

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MOUNT SION


Timeline

Media

The Cyber Hymnal #1000
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  • Noteworthy Composer score (NWC)
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Instances

Instances (1 - 3 of 3)
Text

Hymns for a Pilgrim People #360

TextScoreAudio

The Cyber Hymnal #1000

Text

The New Century Hymnal #383

Include 50 pre-1979 instances
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