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Come, Spirit, come; for here below

Alterer: Harriett Martineau

Martineau, Harriet, was born at Norwich, June 12, 1802, and died at Ambleside, June 27, 1876. Best known as the writer of Illustrations of Political Economy, Retrospect of Western Travel; two novels, Deerbrook and The Hour and the Man; Eastern Life, Past and Present; a History of the Thirty Years’ Peace, and various other works. Her first publication was a book of Devotional Exercises, with hymns appended to each Exercise, and her hymns also belong to what she speaks of in the Autobiography as her "Unitarian" period. Five of them appeared in A Collection of Hymns for Christian Worship, printed in 1831 for the congregation of Eustace Street, Dublin, and edited by her brother, the Rev. James Martineau. 1. All men are equal in their birth.… Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: Come, Spirit, come; for here below
Alterer: Harriett Martineau
Language: English
Publication Date: 1979
Copyright: This text may still be under copyright because it was published in 1979.

Tune

BURFORD


BANGOR (Tansur)

Traditionally used for Montgomery's text and for Peter Abelard's "Alone Thou Goest Forth, O Lord," BANGOR comes from William Tans'ur's A Compleat Melody: or the Harmony of Syon (the preface of which is dated 1734). In that collection the tune was a three-part setting for Psalm 12 (and for Psalm 11 i…

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